These Transitional Spaces: June 30 – August 26, 2012

These Transitional Spaces is a group exhibition organized around contemporary art objects whose representational imagery crystallizes the temporal. The exhibition is curated by artist Seth Kelly for the not-for-profit art space, Franklin Street Works in Stamford, Connecticut. The art in These Transitional Spaces was chosen for its ability to simultaneously represent the time of its making and suggest the impossibility of a specific time and space being fully captured. These qualities allow for the works to serve as visual thresholds within the gallery, prompting viewers to imagine alternative spaces and histories. Artists include Matthew Buckingham, Matt Ducklo, Ilana Halperin, Dana Hoey, Adam Putnam, Karsten Krejcarek, John Miller, Matthew Ronay, and Aura Rosenberg. The exhibition is on view June 30 – August 26, 2012. The free, public reception is Saturday, June 30, 5:00 – 8:00 pm.

Can representational visual systems evoke presence and absence of space transforming it in the same ways that abstract works using light, color, and shape do? These Transitional Spaces proposes spatial transformations that expand beyond an abstract game of the senses.  Everyday scenes, objects, and shared histories act like a distorted mirror that transitions viewers from actual time/space to imagined eras, interiors, and worlds via videos, sculptures, and photographs. These works alter our sensory and psychological relationships to physical environments, including those of exhibition spaces themselves.

With Matthew Buckingham’s The Six Grandfathers, Paha Sapa, in the Year 502,002 C.E. the grand symbolism of a nation’s leaders, fathers in stone, is transported into the future through photo manipulation, sparking viewer imaginations and challenging them to cognitively contextualize an unforeseeable future. Ilana Halperin, on the other hand, evokes the past via new, cast objects made of the mineral composition found in cave formations such as stalactites. In both, the past and present are shifted through suggestions of other times and places.

The real and imagined take a more whimsical, sometimes satirical, turn with the inclusion of Dana Hoey’s Rainbow Painter – the photo features a romanticized, lounging artist and his muses; a floating plastic pear that is John Miller’s sculpture Pear Ubu; and the plastered smiles and stiff styling of Matt Ducklo’s WTVY Dothan, 2011, from The Newscasters series. These works suggest other spaces through the inclusion of set-like elements. With Ducklo’s photograph, characters that usually enter our homes from the virtual dimension of television in the form of light and sound are frozen, waiting for their cue. In Hoey’s photo, a “rainbow painter” and two young women recline by a tree, framed by a rainbow painted onto a concrete wall. The painting within the photograph is made in a style that straddles trompe l’eoil and street art. Its artifice is obvious and a bit out of place, creating a tension in the photograph between the urban and pastoral, between the earthly and the heavenly. With Pear Ubu, the humble plastic pear escapes the fruit bowl and gravity itself, simultaneously becoming a mental prompt and a theatrical prop in the gallery.

These Transitional Spaces also expresses its spatiotemporal concerns through the visceral. With Adam Putnam’s live video feed of an architectural model, the breathing “bones” of a building’s interior anthropomorphizes domestic space, creating a “living” room from a static object using a “live” video feed. The location becomes the subject, sexualized, yet devoid of human bodies — a place of projected space and fantasy existing silently on its own.  In The Astrological Ways, Sagittarius, by Aura Rosenberg, inverted silhouettes of paint on canvas float within the field as the canvas floats on the wall. Like a pear hovering in the gallery or a rainbow painted on cement, these white bodies drifting in black space are plucked from any typical living situation and are then aligned thematically with a heavenly pseudo-science through the artwork’s title. Also grounded in black and relating to the figure, Matthew Ronay’s Cloak of Tears is a collage painting on black canvas that references ceremonial dress, transforming the wearer into a sign of cosmic totemism. Finally, a disembodied voice hovers over the art space’s threshold, a location symbolizing transition between architecture and the world, in Karsten Krejcarek’s Nueva Era de Santo Daime. In this sound piecea voice calls to the woods from a fictional time in the future. With Nueva Era de Santo Daime, time, space, and body coalesce in a fictitious, time-bending narrative that aids in transitioning the visitor from exterior to interior as they enter the gallery.

The venue of Franklin Street Works is an exhibition space with a history of physical alterations. A nineteenth-century house with elements of the interior organized by the Bauhaus line via recent renovations, this location offers a unique setting in which to highlight the shared nature of these artists’ concerns surrounding the spatiotemporal.  The art space’s transitions, whether historical through use and renovation or from room to room as visitors travel the building itself, create a metaphorically rich environment in which to examine art’s aptitude for transitioning our space via imaginative conjecture, subject, and compositional structures.

Stamford Advocate Article/ It’s Relevant Video/

 

posted by Owner on June 30, 2012 at 6:00 pm

These Transitional Spaces: June 30 – August 26, 2012

These Transitional Spaces is a group exhibition organized around contemporary art objects whose representational imagery crystallizes the temporal. The exhibition is curated by artist Seth Kelly for the not-for-profit art space, Franklin Street Works in Stamford, Connecticut. The art in These Transitional Spaces was chosen for its ability to simultaneously represent the time of its making and suggest the impossibility of a specific time and space being fully captured. These qualities allow for the works to serve as visual thresholds within the gallery, prompting viewers to imagine alternative spaces and histories. Artists include Matthew Buckingham, Matt Ducklo, Ilana Halperin, Dana Hoey, Adam Putnam, Karsten Krejcarek, John Miller, Matthew Ronay, and Aura Rosenberg. The exhibition is on view June 30 – August 26, 2012. The free, public reception is Saturday, June 30, 5:00 – 8:00 pm.

Can representational visual systems evoke presence and absence of space transforming it in the same ways that abstract works using light, color, and shape do? These Transitional Spaces proposes spatial transformations that expand beyond an abstract game of the senses.  Everyday scenes, objects, and shared histories act like a distorted mirror that transitions viewers from actual time/space to imagined eras, interiors, and worlds via videos, sculptures, and photographs. These works alter our sensory and psychological relationships to physical environments, including those of exhibition spaces themselves.

With Matthew Buckingham’s The Six Grandfathers, Paha Sapa, in the Year 502,002 C.E. the grand symbolism of a nation’s leaders, fathers in stone, is transported into the future through photo manipulation, sparking viewer imaginations and challenging them to cognitively contextualize an unforeseeable future. Ilana Halperin, on the other hand, evokes the past via new, cast objects made of the mineral composition found in cave formations such as stalactites. In both, the past and present are shifted through suggestions of other times and places.

The real and imagined take a more whimsical, sometimes satirical, turn with the inclusion of Dana Hoey’s Rainbow Painter – the photo features a romanticized, lounging artist and his muses; a floating plastic pear that is John Miller’s sculpture Pear Ubu; and the plastered smiles and stiff styling of Matt Ducklo’s WTVY Dothan, 2011, from The Newscasters series. These works suggest other spaces through the inclusion of set-like elements. With Ducklo’s photograph, characters that usually enter our homes from the virtual dimension of television in the form of light and sound are frozen, waiting for their cue. In Hoey’s photo, a “rainbow painter” and two young women recline by a tree, framed by a rainbow painted onto a concrete wall. The painting within the photograph is made in a style that straddles trompe l’eoil and street art. Its artifice is obvious and a bit out of place, creating a tension in the photograph between the urban and pastoral, between the earthly and the heavenly. With Pear Ubu, the humble plastic pear escapes the fruit bowl and gravity itself, simultaneously becoming a mental prompt and a theatrical prop in the gallery.

These Transitional Spaces also expresses its spatiotemporal concerns through the visceral. With Adam Putnam’s live video feed of an architectural model, the breathing “bones” of a building’s interior anthropomorphizes domestic space, creating a “living” room from a static object using a “live” video feed. The location becomes the subject, sexualized, yet devoid of human bodies — a place of projected space and fantasy existing silently on its own.  In The Astrological Ways, Sagittarius, by Aura Rosenberg, inverted silhouettes of paint on canvas float within the field as the canvas floats on the wall. Like a pear hovering in the gallery or a rainbow painted on cement, these white bodies drifting in black space are plucked from any typical living situation and are then aligned thematically with a heavenly pseudo-science through the artwork’s title. Also grounded in black and relating to the figure, Matthew Ronay’s Cloak of Tears is a collage painting on black canvas that references ceremonial dress, transforming the wearer into a sign of cosmic totemism. Finally, a disembodied voice hovers over the art space’s threshold, a location symbolizing transition between architecture and the world, in Karsten Krejcarek’s Nueva Era de Santo Daime. In this sound piecea voice calls to the woods from a fictional time in the future. With Nueva Era de Santo Daime, time, space, and body coalesce in a fictitious, time-bending narrative that aids in transitioning the visitor from exterior to interior as they enter the gallery.

The venue of Franklin Street Works is an exhibition space with a history of physical alterations. A nineteenth-century house with elements of the interior organized by the Bauhaus line via recent renovations, this location offers a unique setting in which to highlight the shared nature of these artists’ concerns surrounding the spatiotemporal.  The art space’s transitions, whether historical through use and renovation or from room to room as visitors travel the building itself, create a metaphorically rich environment in which to examine art’s aptitude for transitioning our space via imaginative conjecture, subject, and compositional structures.

Stamford Advocate Article/ It’s Relevant Video/

 

Pre-screening Reception for Herman and Shelly at Franklin Street Works

Franklin Street Works and the Avon Theatre are happy to be collaborating on an event for the first time. Please Join Us! for a night with emerging filmmaker Bridget Stokes to screen her movie, Herman and Shelly, Wednesday, June 27. Reception 6:00 – 7:00 pm at Franklin Street Works. Screening is at 7:30 in the Avon Theatre. We are walking distance from each other so enjoy a summer stroll in downtown stamford between events! This event is sponsored by the Loft Artists Association and Reckson.

MORE:

The Avon Theatre and the not-for-profit contemporary art space Franklin Street Works celebrate the first feature from local filmmaker, Bridget Stokes, titled Herman & Shelly with a screening on June 27th at 7:30 p.m. It is preceded by a reception at Franklin Street Works from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m., which features a signature cocktail by Rodizio Grill and Thomas Hooker beer. As creative platforms for art and film, Franklin Street Works and The Avon are committed to original programming for creative professionals. Sharing kindred missions, these alternative spaces are embarking on an initial partnership for what will hopefully be the first of many joint-efforts moving forward. In addition to the reception at the art space, there will be a post-film Q&A with the filmmakers. Ticket prices include the reception and are as follows: Carte Blanche: FREE, Members: $6, Students & Seniors: $8, Nonmembers: $11. For advance tickets, please call the Avon business office at 203-661-0321 or the box office at 203-967-3660. For our more spontaneous film enthusiasts, tickets will also be available at the door the night of the screening. This event is sponsored by the Loft Artists Association and Reckson.

ABOUT THE FILM: In this offbeat, quirky romantic comedy, high school chums Herman and Shelly navigate the odd transition from much-hyped youthful art prodigies to overlooked adult artists. Ambitions are pitted against lifelong bonds, with the zany mess of the art world acting as an ever-changing backdrop. A fresh take on coming of age, the murky space between lovers and friends, and the personal sacrifices endured for one’s art.

ABOUT THE AVON: The Avon Theatre is a member-supported, non-profit cultural hub, dedicated to presenting film in its highest form, and thriving because of the support of our patrons and community. In addition to an exciting slate of new releases that are hard to find anywhere else, The Avon brings you phenomenal special events and monthly programs. We are proud to provide a forum for in-person, community dialogue with directors, actors and other luminaries in a vibrant “Main Street America” setting.

ABOUT FRANKLIN STREET WORKS: Franklin Street Works is a new, not-for-profit contemporary art space, café, and social gathering place in Stamford, Connecticut. Located in renovated row houses on Franklin Street, the two-story space includes three galleries and a café. Franklin Street Works is located at 41 Franklin Street in downtown Stamford, Connecticut, near the UCONN campus. On street parking is available on Franklin Street and paid parking is available nearby in a lot on Franklin Street and in the Summer Street Garage (100 Summer Street), behind Target. For more information call 203-595-5211 or visit www.franklinstreetworks.org

ABOUT OUR SPONSORS: Loft Artists Association provides artists with a supportive environment, opportunities to exhibit their work, and networking opportunities and to reach out to the community at large with education and artistic expression.  Reckson, a division of SL Green Realty Corp. is Westchester and Fairfield counties’ largest Owner of class A office space, comprising 30 properties over 4 million square feet of commercial space. Avon Theatre Film Center, 272 Bedford St, Stamford, CT 06901, Box Office: (203) 967-3660, Business Office: (203) 661-0321, Website: www.avontheatre.org,Twitter: @avontheatre, Facebook: www.facebook.com/avontheatre

SPONSORS:

posted by Owner on June 27, 2012 at 6:00 pm

Pre-screening Reception for Herman and Shelly at Franklin Street Works

Franklin Street Works and the Avon Theatre are happy to be collaborating on an event for the first time. Please Join Us! for a night with emerging filmmaker Bridget Stokes to screen her movie, Herman and Shelly, Wednesday, June 27. Reception 6:00 – 7:00 pm at Franklin Street Works. Screening is at 7:30 in the Avon Theatre. We are walking distance from each other so enjoy a summer stroll in downtown stamford between events! This event is sponsored by the Loft Artists Association and Reckson.

MORE:

The Avon Theatre and the not-for-profit contemporary art space Franklin Street Works celebrate the first feature from local filmmaker, Bridget Stokes, titled Herman & Shelly with a screening on June 27th at 7:30 p.m. It is preceded by a reception at Franklin Street Works from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m., which features a signature cocktail by Rodizio Grill and Thomas Hooker beer. As creative platforms for art and film, Franklin Street Works and The Avon are committed to original programming for creative professionals. Sharing kindred missions, these alternative spaces are embarking on an initial partnership for what will hopefully be the first of many joint-efforts moving forward. In addition to the reception at the art space, there will be a post-film Q&A with the filmmakers. Ticket prices include the reception and are as follows: Carte Blanche: FREE, Members: $6, Students & Seniors: $8, Nonmembers: $11. For advance tickets, please call the Avon business office at 203-661-0321 or the box office at 203-967-3660. For our more spontaneous film enthusiasts, tickets will also be available at the door the night of the screening. This event is sponsored by the Loft Artists Association and Reckson.

ABOUT THE FILM: In this offbeat, quirky romantic comedy, high school chums Herman and Shelly navigate the odd transition from much-hyped youthful art prodigies to overlooked adult artists. Ambitions are pitted against lifelong bonds, with the zany mess of the art world acting as an ever-changing backdrop. A fresh take on coming of age, the murky space between lovers and friends, and the personal sacrifices endured for one’s art.

ABOUT THE AVON: The Avon Theatre is a member-supported, non-profit cultural hub, dedicated to presenting film in its highest form, and thriving because of the support of our patrons and community. In addition to an exciting slate of new releases that are hard to find anywhere else, The Avon brings you phenomenal special events and monthly programs. We are proud to provide a forum for in-person, community dialogue with directors, actors and other luminaries in a vibrant “Main Street America” setting.

ABOUT FRANKLIN STREET WORKS: Franklin Street Works is a new, not-for-profit contemporary art space, café, and social gathering place in Stamford, Connecticut. Located in renovated row houses on Franklin Street, the two-story space includes three galleries and a café. Franklin Street Works is located at 41 Franklin Street in downtown Stamford, Connecticut, near the UCONN campus. On street parking is available on Franklin Street and paid parking is available nearby in a lot on Franklin Street and in the Summer Street Garage (100 Summer Street), behind Target. For more information call 203-595-5211 or visit www.franklinstreetworks.org

ABOUT OUR SPONSORS: Loft Artists Association provides artists with a supportive environment, opportunities to exhibit their work, and networking opportunities and to reach out to the community at large with education and artistic expression.  Reckson, a division of SL Green Realty Corp. is Westchester and Fairfield counties’ largest Owner of class A office space, comprising 30 properties over 4 million square feet of commercial space. Avon Theatre Film Center, 272 Bedford St, Stamford, CT 06901, Box Office: (203) 967-3660, Business Office: (203) 661-0321, Website: www.avontheatre.org,Twitter: @avontheatre, Facebook: www.facebook.com/avontheatre

SPONSORS:

An Evening with Dekit Magazine, June 21, 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Franklin Street Works presents: An Evening with Dekit Magazine.  For the event, Dekit’s creators discuss how their nascent online magazine is a platform for emerging cultural producers and a catalyst for dialogue with both a local and global reach. Similar to Franklin Street Works, Dekit is decidedly interdisciplinary, featuring the visual arts, fashion, music, and more via shared themes such as “What does it mean to be human?” and the materiality of identity. A small but growing independent online publication based in Stamford, Connecticut, Dekit has featured street artists, photographers, painters, videographers, and musicians. Dekit’s experiments in artistic discourse encourages unique ways of approaching creative enterprises.

On June 21 from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Dekit magazine founder Stephanie Harris and the magazine’s Creative Director Nina Irizarry will share their story, leading a casual conversation about DIY-spirited publishing and the emerging artists they have collaborated with since the magazine’s inception. Additionally, Dekit will screen a video project that highlights some of the magazine’s featured artists, especially for this event.

According to Dekit’s creators, “The inception of the Internet and the innovation of technology have resulted in a shattering of geographic boundaries. Having a digital world at our fingertips has impacted the way in which we communicate, the types of dialogues we engage in or create, and the ways we influence one another,” adding, “This age of cutting edge innovations has also created a golden age of flux.”

Franklin Street Works and Dekit Magazine collaborated to produce this informative event that highlights the magazine’s mission, its challenges and its goals for the future. This event is part of Franklin Street Works’ commitment to providing an alternative space for contemporary art while providing a discursive platform for other independent ventures in art and culture. The event is free and open to the public.

 

posted by Owner on June 21, 2012 at 4:30 pm

An Evening with Dekit Magazine, June 21, 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Franklin Street Works presents: An Evening with Dekit Magazine.  For the event, Dekit’s creators discuss how their nascent online magazine is a platform for emerging cultural producers and a catalyst for dialogue with both a local and global reach. Similar to Franklin Street Works, Dekit is decidedly interdisciplinary, featuring the visual arts, fashion, music, and more via shared themes such as “What does it mean to be human?” and the materiality of identity. A small but growing independent online publication based in Stamford, Connecticut, Dekit has featured street artists, photographers, painters, videographers, and musicians. Dekit’s experiments in artistic discourse encourages unique ways of approaching creative enterprises.

On June 21 from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Dekit magazine founder Stephanie Harris and the magazine’s Creative Director Nina Irizarry will share their story, leading a casual conversation about DIY-spirited publishing and the emerging artists they have collaborated with since the magazine’s inception. Additionally, Dekit will screen a video project that highlights some of the magazine’s featured artists, especially for this event.

According to Dekit’s creators, “The inception of the Internet and the innovation of technology have resulted in a shattering of geographic boundaries. Having a digital world at our fingertips has impacted the way in which we communicate, the types of dialogues we engage in or create, and the ways we influence one another,” adding, “This age of cutting edge innovations has also created a golden age of flux.”

Franklin Street Works and Dekit Magazine collaborated to produce this informative event that highlights the magazine’s mission, its challenges and its goals for the future. This event is part of Franklin Street Works’ commitment to providing an alternative space for contemporary art while providing a discursive platform for other independent ventures in art and culture. The event is free and open to the public.

 

S#!T/STORM: The Art of Data

Franklin Street Works presents an evening with two Internet entrepreneurs living in Fairfield County whose reach extends far beyond  the geographic boundaries of Connecticut. Young and dedicated, they have each developed a website that reflects their interests in the Internet’s ability to organize and share data on a single subject. For EveryTornado.net, Sam Sagnella spent several years conceiving and building a website database project whose goal is to provide a broader insight into United States tornadoes by supplementing statistical data with first-hand event video gathered from those who were there. He will give a multi-media presentation, highlighting his efforts. For the second half of the talk, website designer and programmer Jeff Schram of Schram Industries discusses his experiment in gathering data from Twitter with PoopStats.com. His site investigates the phenomenon of people tweeting with the hashtag #pooping. This identifier indicates that the author is pooping while tweeting.  Schram programmed a site whose home page is in constant flux as the number of #pooping tweeters changes with the ebb and flow of this one thread of Twitter activity.  With PoopStats, the quirky and curious can see how many people in the world are tweeting while pooping at any particular time!

Franklin Street Works named this exciting program S#!T/Storm: The Art of Data to reflect the themes, humor, and freshness of these digital thinkers and their projects! Through projected images, informal lecture, and performance, we will learn more about the thinking, logistics, and interfaces of these nascent websites. This free, public event takes place from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. at Franklin Street Works on Wednesday, June 13.

EveryTornado.net is a unique tornado database project that includes riveting videos, allowing for site visitors to learn about the details of specific tornado events and  also to “witness” them. Since launching in August of 2011, EveryTornado.net has chronicled nearly 1000 tornadoes, and archived event videos for more than half of them. In the present-day social media world, the sharing of experiences has become a way for people to learn from what others have gone through without ever meeting them. EveryTornado.net captures people’s recorded tornado encounters, and organizes them in a way that produces a dramatic perspective into what experiencing a tornado can be like. Featured videos come from every type of scenario: from storm chasers using their professional High-Definition video cameras, to commuters caught in traffic on the highway using smartphones, to people in their backyards with  family camcorders. Tornadoes have impacted every state in the country. Connecticut has been hit 79 times since 1950, with 12 occurring in the last six years alone. The Nutmeg State’s 79 modern tornadoes have caused in excess of 300 million dollars in property damage and killed at least three people.

A more humorous approach to collecting data, PoopStats.com is the brainchild of web designer Jeff Schram, who splits his time between Stamford and New York City. With PoopStats.com, Schram created a homepage that monitors how many people are using #pooping while tweeting at any given time. According to Schram, “At any given moment, there are roughly 300-500 people #pooping on Twitter.  Seriously, we can’t make this shit up,” adding “PoopStats.com was created as a fun experiment to investigate this phenomenon of Twitter users adding #pooping to their tweets and the motivations behind people wanting to let you know the most private moments of their lives.” In his presentation, PoopStats creator Jeff Schram talks about the inspiration and creation of the website, what he’s learned so far, and what he hopes to discover venturing down this bold path.

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

Sam Sagnella, a 25-year old Westport, Connecticut, native with a lifelong passion for weather, founded EveryTornado.net.  By his sophomore year at Staples High School he was enrolled in an “authentic science research” class, which allowed students to choose a project that interested them and invest school hours in researching it.  Sam’s project “Severe Weather Preparedness of Fairfield County, Connecticut Towns” involved interviews with emergency management personnel from around the county, and its success led to an eventual presentation of his findings on live television through ABC affiliate WTNH-TV in 2003. After graduating from Staples in 2004, Sam moved to Oklahoma to continue to pursue a career in the field of meteorology, and began chasing storms there in 2005. It was during these next few years — during which he witnessed more than a dozen tornadoes — that the idea for EveryTornado.net was born.

Jeff Schram has been working in the web industry, based in NYC, for the last 7 years. Though he started off as an independent freelancer, he’s recently enjoyed working alongside such companies as The Cutting Room, Modus Associates and Crush + Lovely. He combines his love of art, music and creativity with an in-depth knowledge of the inner-workings of the web and is the owner of Schram Industries, a web design firm.

This event is sponsored, in part, by Lamburt Corporation Insurance, Stratford, Connecticut, www.lamburt.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

posted by Owner on June 13, 2012 at 5:30 pm

S#!T/STORM: The Art of Data

Franklin Street Works presents an evening with two Internet entrepreneurs living in Fairfield County whose reach extends far beyond  the geographic boundaries of Connecticut. Young and dedicated, they have each developed a website that reflects their interests in the Internet’s ability to organize and share data on a single subject. For EveryTornado.net, Sam Sagnella spent several years conceiving and building a website database project whose goal is to provide a broader insight into United States tornadoes by supplementing statistical data with first-hand event video gathered from those who were there. He will give a multi-media presentation, highlighting his efforts. For the second half of the talk, website designer and programmer Jeff Schram of Schram Industries discusses his experiment in gathering data from Twitter with PoopStats.com. His site investigates the phenomenon of people tweeting with the hashtag #pooping. This identifier indicates that the author is pooping while tweeting.  Schram programmed a site whose home page is in constant flux as the number of #pooping tweeters changes with the ebb and flow of this one thread of Twitter activity.  With PoopStats, the quirky and curious can see how many people in the world are tweeting while pooping at any particular time!

Franklin Street Works named this exciting program S#!T/Storm: The Art of Data to reflect the themes, humor, and freshness of these digital thinkers and their projects! Through projected images, informal lecture, and performance, we will learn more about the thinking, logistics, and interfaces of these nascent websites. This free, public event takes place from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. at Franklin Street Works on Wednesday, June 13.

EveryTornado.net is a unique tornado database project that includes riveting videos, allowing for site visitors to learn about the details of specific tornado events and  also to “witness” them. Since launching in August of 2011, EveryTornado.net has chronicled nearly 1000 tornadoes, and archived event videos for more than half of them. In the present-day social media world, the sharing of experiences has become a way for people to learn from what others have gone through without ever meeting them. EveryTornado.net captures people’s recorded tornado encounters, and organizes them in a way that produces a dramatic perspective into what experiencing a tornado can be like. Featured videos come from every type of scenario: from storm chasers using their professional High-Definition video cameras, to commuters caught in traffic on the highway using smartphones, to people in their backyards with  family camcorders. Tornadoes have impacted every state in the country. Connecticut has been hit 79 times since 1950, with 12 occurring in the last six years alone. The Nutmeg State’s 79 modern tornadoes have caused in excess of 300 million dollars in property damage and killed at least three people.

A more humorous approach to collecting data, PoopStats.com is the brainchild of web designer Jeff Schram, who splits his time between Stamford and New York City. With PoopStats.com, Schram created a homepage that monitors how many people are using #pooping while tweeting at any given time. According to Schram, “At any given moment, there are roughly 300-500 people #pooping on Twitter.  Seriously, we can’t make this shit up,” adding “PoopStats.com was created as a fun experiment to investigate this phenomenon of Twitter users adding #pooping to their tweets and the motivations behind people wanting to let you know the most private moments of their lives.” In his presentation, PoopStats creator Jeff Schram talks about the inspiration and creation of the website, what he’s learned so far, and what he hopes to discover venturing down this bold path.

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

Sam Sagnella, a 25-year old Westport, Connecticut, native with a lifelong passion for weather, founded EveryTornado.net.  By his sophomore year at Staples High School he was enrolled in an “authentic science research” class, which allowed students to choose a project that interested them and invest school hours in researching it.  Sam’s project “Severe Weather Preparedness of Fairfield County, Connecticut Towns” involved interviews with emergency management personnel from around the county, and its success led to an eventual presentation of his findings on live television through ABC affiliate WTNH-TV in 2003. After graduating from Staples in 2004, Sam moved to Oklahoma to continue to pursue a career in the field of meteorology, and began chasing storms there in 2005. It was during these next few years — during which he witnessed more than a dozen tornadoes — that the idea for EveryTornado.net was born.

Jeff Schram has been working in the web industry, based in NYC, for the last 7 years. Though he started off as an independent freelancer, he’s recently enjoyed working alongside such companies as The Cutting Room, Modus Associates and Crush + Lovely. He combines his love of art, music and creativity with an in-depth knowledge of the inner-workings of the web and is the owner of Schram Industries, a web design firm.

This event is sponsored, in part, by Lamburt Corporation Insurance, Stratford, Connecticut, www.lamburt.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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