KENT EVANS: READING AND MUSIC – A CRASH COURSE ON THE ANATOMY OF ROBOTS

Franklin Street Works is proud to present an evening of music and readings with Kent Evans, author and multi-platform artist. This free public event is Thursday, September 20, from 5:30 – 7:00 pm and features Kent Evan’s forthcoming novel A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots, which releases on September 17, 2012 (Pangea Books).

Franklin Street Works is excited to be one of the first venues to host Evans after the release of his highly praised novel in this unique event that includes the author reading and related live music performances. Kent Evans will play guitar, Laura Wilson will be on violin, and Andrew Trudeau will join in with multiple instruments. While at the event audiences can also enjoy Franklin Street Work’s current group show, “VHS The Exhibition”! Curated by Rebecca Cleman, the exhibition explores VHS as a tool and inspiration for artistic experimentation, with a heavy dose of ephemera from the ‘80s analogue culture.

Kent Evan’s A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots is a gripping action-adventure novel inspired by personal events in the author’s life. Evan’s explains, “The books is sort of a love song to being an artist, travel, the death of my parents, and disastrous relationships.” The main character, Damien Wood, is a young man whose lived his life as a mere robot, hurling himself with abandon from place to place and from one hollow commitment to another. It is only after a series of tragedies that Damien’s full spectrum of emotions start to emerge, which sends him to Asia on a dark odyssey of self-revelation. The book has been widely praised, including Inés Ferrero Cándenas observation, “Crash Course travels on the wings of poetry, autobiography, relationships and humor to cross-examine modern reality and cultural rebellion.” Kent Evans also collaborated with musicians for an original soundtrack accompanying the book, available now on iTunes.

MORE: Video Footage of his performance on Vimeo, It’s Relevant Video Story on Kent Evans, and Kent’s Website.

About Kent Evans:

Half Cantonese and half UK, Kent Evans was born in New York City in 1975 and grew up between New York, Connecticut and Rhode Island. After graduating from New York University, he began traveling extensively throughout North America, Europe, Asia and the Caribbean. He is the author of Malas Ondas: Lime, Sand Sex and Salsa in the land of conquistadors, a semi-autobiographical novel about self-destruction throughout Latin America and finding love.  A fixture on the spoken word and experimental art scene in the 90’s, the artist has performed at such venues as Madison Square Garden Theatre and Académie Beaux Arts in Paris. His creative non-fiction and opinion pieces have appeared in numerous national pop-culture and literary zines and publications.

 

 

posted by Owner on September 20, 2012 at 5:30 pm

KENT EVANS: READING AND MUSIC – A CRASH COURSE ON THE ANATOMY OF ROBOTS

Franklin Street Works is proud to present an evening of music and readings with Kent Evans, author and multi-platform artist. This free public event is Thursday, September 20, from 5:30 – 7:00 pm and features Kent Evan’s forthcoming novel A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots, which releases on September 17, 2012 (Pangea Books).

Franklin Street Works is excited to be one of the first venues to host Evans after the release of his highly praised novel in this unique event that includes the author reading and related live music performances. Kent Evans will play guitar, Laura Wilson will be on violin, and Andrew Trudeau will join in with multiple instruments. While at the event audiences can also enjoy Franklin Street Work’s current group show, “VHS The Exhibition”! Curated by Rebecca Cleman, the exhibition explores VHS as a tool and inspiration for artistic experimentation, with a heavy dose of ephemera from the ‘80s analogue culture.

Kent Evan’s A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots is a gripping action-adventure novel inspired by personal events in the author’s life. Evan’s explains, “The books is sort of a love song to being an artist, travel, the death of my parents, and disastrous relationships.” The main character, Damien Wood, is a young man whose lived his life as a mere robot, hurling himself with abandon from place to place and from one hollow commitment to another. It is only after a series of tragedies that Damien’s full spectrum of emotions start to emerge, which sends him to Asia on a dark odyssey of self-revelation. The book has been widely praised, including Inés Ferrero Cándenas observation, “Crash Course travels on the wings of poetry, autobiography, relationships and humor to cross-examine modern reality and cultural rebellion.” Kent Evans also collaborated with musicians for an original soundtrack accompanying the book, available now on iTunes.

MORE: Video Footage of his performance on Vimeo, It’s Relevant Video Story on Kent Evans, and Kent’s Website.

About Kent Evans:

Half Cantonese and half UK, Kent Evans was born in New York City in 1975 and grew up between New York, Connecticut and Rhode Island. After graduating from New York University, he began traveling extensively throughout North America, Europe, Asia and the Caribbean. He is the author of Malas Ondas: Lime, Sand Sex and Salsa in the land of conquistadors, a semi-autobiographical novel about self-destruction throughout Latin America and finding love.  A fixture on the spoken word and experimental art scene in the 90’s, the artist has performed at such venues as Madison Square Garden Theatre and Académie Beaux Arts in Paris. His creative non-fiction and opinion pieces have appeared in numerous national pop-culture and literary zines and publications.

 

 

VHS The Exhibition

VHS The Exhibition: September 6 – October 14, 2012

Free, public reception, Thursday, September 13 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm. Gallery Walk Through, Thursday October 6, 6:00 – 6:45 followed by cocktails in the cafe.

 

(Recommended Reading for this show: Stamford Advocate article by Scott Gargan;  VHS The Exhibition Catalog, also available on site; and Rebecca Cleman’s article “Ghosts in the Machine” on VHS and the horror film genre. Click HERE to see installation photographs)

The black VHS tape, a brick-like relic of the pre-digital age, is a dark talisman of analog video culture.  Now a mysterious and outmoded technology that necessitates a physical ritual of loading the tape into the jaws of a temperamental VCR, the widespread marketing of a home video system of video cameras, recording decks, and cassette tapes in the 1980s represented a sea change in how individuals engaged with television.

Trevor Shimizu, "Final Analog Broadcast," 2009, 48 min, color, sound, courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, NY.

VHS The Exhibition, which is the brainchild of guest curator Rebecca Cleman, will explore the use of this format for artistic experimentation.  The exhibition will include works by Robert Beck, Sadie Benning, Dustin Guy Defa, James Fotopoulos, and Trevor Shimizu. Artworks will be accompanied by ephemera from ‘80s-era home video culture, such as the glitchy computer-generated, anti-corporate corporate spokesman Max Headroom, to give a broad perspective on the cultural shifts created by this technological phenomenon in entertainment, life, and art.

Artists have used video for personal ends since the release of the first consumer-grade video cameras in the 1960s.  This equipment gave them a way to intervene and critique the hegemony of television, often by focusing on themes and subjects that were excluded from mainstream broadcasts.  For many of these artists, it was important to characterize these interventions as alternative modes of professional production that could subvert the matrix of corporate television.  A later use of amateur home video equipment could also be described as anti-television and countercultural – but the innately low quality of VHS, related to its mass-market appeal, further illustrates how artists self-reflexively work with antiquated technology to provoke art mythologies of value, authenticity, and permanence.

Dustin Guy Defa, "Family Nightmare," 2011, 10 min, color, sound, courtesy of the artist

More than being formalist explorations of VHS’s inherent qualities, the works in this exhibition engage the psychological associations of the medium, especially those that reflect the fragility of institutions, whether of self, family or society. The ability to watch TV shows on one’s own schedule or to forego the broadcasters altogether to watch self-procured or self-produced content made the experience of television more private and interactive.  Cleman adds, “As an alternative to sanctioned broadcasts, home video enabled the broad distribution of unwholesome entertainment, marking the VHS tape as a carrier of ungovernable, possibly even corrosive content.  The ominous VHS tape of dubious origin, referenced in dark-themed films like Hideo Nakata’s Ringu, David Lynch’s Lost Highway, or the forthcoming horror film V/H/S, evokes an unconscious confusion of sex, violence, and death.”  Drawing connections such as these, Cleman positions VHS The Exhibition as an exploration of the cultural impact of home video on both a public and personal front. The exhibition will be on view from September 6 through October 14, 2012. A free, public reception is scheduled during the show’s second week, Thursday, September 13 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm.

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Rebecca Cleman is the Director of Distribution of Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), NY. She has programmed screenings for the New York Underground Film Festival, Light Industry, Anthology Film Archives and the Migrating Forms Festival among other venues.  In 2010 she co-curated the media content for Amnesia at Andrea Rosen Gallery. She has most recently organized two programs within the VHS series at the Museum of Art and Design, NY, and published an essay on the subject of horror movies and home video for the Moving Image Source.  Cleman lives and works in NYC.

posted by Owner on September 6, 2012 at 5:00 pm

VHS The Exhibition

VHS The Exhibition: September 6 – October 14, 2012

Free, public reception, Thursday, September 13 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm. Gallery Walk Through, Thursday October 6, 6:00 – 6:45 followed by cocktails in the cafe.

 

(Recommended Reading for this show: Stamford Advocate article by Scott Gargan;  VHS The Exhibition Catalog, also available on site; and Rebecca Cleman’s article “Ghosts in the Machine” on VHS and the horror film genre. Click HERE to see installation photographs)

The black VHS tape, a brick-like relic of the pre-digital age, is a dark talisman of analog video culture.  Now a mysterious and outmoded technology that necessitates a physical ritual of loading the tape into the jaws of a temperamental VCR, the widespread marketing of a home video system of video cameras, recording decks, and cassette tapes in the 1980s represented a sea change in how individuals engaged with television.

Trevor Shimizu, "Final Analog Broadcast," 2009, 48 min, color, sound, courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, NY.

VHS The Exhibition, which is the brainchild of guest curator Rebecca Cleman, will explore the use of this format for artistic experimentation.  The exhibition will include works by Robert Beck, Sadie Benning, Dustin Guy Defa, James Fotopoulos, and Trevor Shimizu. Artworks will be accompanied by ephemera from ‘80s-era home video culture, such as the glitchy computer-generated, anti-corporate corporate spokesman Max Headroom, to give a broad perspective on the cultural shifts created by this technological phenomenon in entertainment, life, and art.

Artists have used video for personal ends since the release of the first consumer-grade video cameras in the 1960s.  This equipment gave them a way to intervene and critique the hegemony of television, often by focusing on themes and subjects that were excluded from mainstream broadcasts.  For many of these artists, it was important to characterize these interventions as alternative modes of professional production that could subvert the matrix of corporate television.  A later use of amateur home video equipment could also be described as anti-television and countercultural – but the innately low quality of VHS, related to its mass-market appeal, further illustrates how artists self-reflexively work with antiquated technology to provoke art mythologies of value, authenticity, and permanence.

Dustin Guy Defa, "Family Nightmare," 2011, 10 min, color, sound, courtesy of the artist

More than being formalist explorations of VHS’s inherent qualities, the works in this exhibition engage the psychological associations of the medium, especially those that reflect the fragility of institutions, whether of self, family or society. The ability to watch TV shows on one’s own schedule or to forego the broadcasters altogether to watch self-procured or self-produced content made the experience of television more private and interactive.  Cleman adds, “As an alternative to sanctioned broadcasts, home video enabled the broad distribution of unwholesome entertainment, marking the VHS tape as a carrier of ungovernable, possibly even corrosive content.  The ominous VHS tape of dubious origin, referenced in dark-themed films like Hideo Nakata’s Ringu, David Lynch’s Lost Highway, or the forthcoming horror film V/H/S, evokes an unconscious confusion of sex, violence, and death.”  Drawing connections such as these, Cleman positions VHS The Exhibition as an exploration of the cultural impact of home video on both a public and personal front. The exhibition will be on view from September 6 through October 14, 2012. A free, public reception is scheduled during the show’s second week, Thursday, September 13 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm.

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Rebecca Cleman is the Director of Distribution of Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), NY. She has programmed screenings for the New York Underground Film Festival, Light Industry, Anthology Film Archives and the Migrating Forms Festival among other venues.  In 2010 she co-curated the media content for Amnesia at Andrea Rosen Gallery. She has most recently organized two programs within the VHS series at the Museum of Art and Design, NY, and published an essay on the subject of horror movies and home video for the Moving Image Source.  Cleman lives and works in NYC.

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