An Incomplete Portrait of the Reanimation Library

Thursday, May 30 from 6:30 – 8:00 pm, Franklin Street Works will host An Incomplete Portrait of the Reanimation Library. This free, public event features Reanimation Library founder, Andrew Beccone, performing a set of short readings made up entirely of excerpts from the library’s holdings. The readings are paired with projected images from Reanimation Library’s image archive. Sequenced, unmediated fragments of found text and an accompanying stream of decontextualized images will provide a personalized, fractured, and incomplete portrait of the wide-ranging attitudes, ideologies, and visual systems contained within the collection. The event is in the casual, intimate environment of Franklin Street Works’ upstairs gallery.

Beccone’s performance is one of eight exhibition programs Franklin Street Works organized for the art space’s current group exhibition Strange Invitation, which includes a Reanimation Library branch featuring dozens of locally sourced books and artworks by Brooklyn based artist Pradeep Dalal. The performance takes place in the Reanimation Library FSW branch and lends a first- hand, experiential perspective on the library’s role as a generative source for making new artworks from the collection.

According to Beccone, these performances provide a platform to focus on texts found in the library’s collection, explaining, “I started doing readings from texts found in the library because I’ve become increasingly interested in and engaged with the language in the collection. A lot of the information in the library is very dry, and unlikely to have ever been read aloud. Most of it was not intended to be, but I have started unearthing small fragments – from a sentence to a few paragraphs – that strike me as particularly unusual. The Incomplete Portrait is a kind of way to let the library speak for itself.”

For more on Reanimation Library http://www.reanimationlibrary.org/

posted by Owner on May 30, 2013 at 6:30 pm

An Incomplete Portrait of the Reanimation Library

Thursday, May 30 from 6:30 – 8:00 pm, Franklin Street Works will host An Incomplete Portrait of the Reanimation Library. This free, public event features Reanimation Library founder, Andrew Beccone, performing a set of short readings made up entirely of excerpts from the library’s holdings. The readings are paired with projected images from Reanimation Library’s image archive. Sequenced, unmediated fragments of found text and an accompanying stream of decontextualized images will provide a personalized, fractured, and incomplete portrait of the wide-ranging attitudes, ideologies, and visual systems contained within the collection. The event is in the casual, intimate environment of Franklin Street Works’ upstairs gallery.

Beccone’s performance is one of eight exhibition programs Franklin Street Works organized for the art space’s current group exhibition Strange Invitation, which includes a Reanimation Library branch featuring dozens of locally sourced books and artworks by Brooklyn based artist Pradeep Dalal. The performance takes place in the Reanimation Library FSW branch and lends a first- hand, experiential perspective on the library’s role as a generative source for making new artworks from the collection.

According to Beccone, these performances provide a platform to focus on texts found in the library’s collection, explaining, “I started doing readings from texts found in the library because I’ve become increasingly interested in and engaged with the language in the collection. A lot of the information in the library is very dry, and unlikely to have ever been read aloud. Most of it was not intended to be, but I have started unearthing small fragments – from a sentence to a few paragraphs – that strike me as particularly unusual. The Incomplete Portrait is a kind of way to let the library speak for itself.”

For more on Reanimation Library http://www.reanimationlibrary.org/

Art in the New City: Stephen Zacks

Join Franklin Street Works at the Stamford Innovation Center on Thursday, May 23, from 6:00 – 7:30 pm for “Art in the New City,” a talk by Brooklyn-based journalist, reporter and founder of the Flint Public Art Project, Stephen Zacks. Currently, Zacks is writing A Beautiful Ruin: The Generation that Transformed New York: 1967 – 1986. He will share his insights informed by a unique combination of historical research and hands-on experience to indicate how practices of public art and design can be put at the service of contemporary city-making. With Connecticut’s recent emphasis on ideas of “placemaking,” this is a highly anticipated conversation that will contribute to the regional dialogue about how contemporary art can invigorate towns and cities.

The talk will take place at the Stamford Innovation Center, located at the Old Town Hall, which is a new entrepreneurial hub in Stamford striving to create community-driven space and encouraging the free exchange of ideas and resources for start-up businesses. The perfect backdrop for Stephen Zacks’ talk on innovative urban art practices, the Stamford Innovation Center will join Franklin Street Works in hosting this free, public event.

As the Director of the Flint Public Art Project (FPAF), Stephen Zacks was one of three collaborators invited to participate in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, Strange Invitation (April 6 – June 16). This original Franklin Street Works show examines some of the relationships between art and activism that are happening around the country today. Zacks invited the emerging Flint artist collective Flower Tour to collaborate with him for the exhibition. Flower Tour blends fashion, performance, video and installation to bring color and excitement into public spaces. Their project is an extension of the FPAF’s mission, which, according to Zacks “draws on multiple artistic disciplines in an effort to transform the city’s image and identity, activate disused sites, connect places, and amplify the local culture.”

ABOUT STEPHEN ZACKS:

Flint Public Art Project founder and executive director Stephen Zacks is an internationally recognized architecture and urbanism reporter, theorist, and

1cultural producer based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and a native of Flint, Michigan. He received an M.A. in Liberal Studies from the New School for Social Research, served as an editor of Metropolis, and has received awards from the NY State Council on the Arts, Newtown Creek Fund, Graham Foundation, ArtPlace, MacDowell Colony, and the Warhol Foundation. Co-founder of the Bring to Light– Nuit Blanche New York festival, he is currently writing A Beautiful Ruin: The Generation that Transformed New York, 1967-1986, a nonfiction narrative about the role of contemporary artists in reinvigorating New York neighborhoods during the mid-70s fiscal crisis (Princeton Architectural Press, 2014).

ABOUT THE STAMFORD INNOVATION CENTER:

Featuring coworking, dedicated offices, conference facilities and a comprehensive slate of startup-centric classes and events, the Stamford Innovation Center, which opened in November 2012, is the ideal place for young enterprises to grow and interact with peers, mentors, investors, industry experts and service providers. For information on how to join our community, please visit www.stamfordicenter.com.

 

posted by Owner on May 23, 2013 at 6:00 pm

Art in the New City: Stephen Zacks

Join Franklin Street Works at the Stamford Innovation Center on Thursday, May 23, from 6:00 – 7:30 pm for “Art in the New City,” a talk by Brooklyn-based journalist, reporter and founder of the Flint Public Art Project, Stephen Zacks. Currently, Zacks is writing A Beautiful Ruin: The Generation that Transformed New York: 1967 – 1986. He will share his insights informed by a unique combination of historical research and hands-on experience to indicate how practices of public art and design can be put at the service of contemporary city-making. With Connecticut’s recent emphasis on ideas of “placemaking,” this is a highly anticipated conversation that will contribute to the regional dialogue about how contemporary art can invigorate towns and cities.

The talk will take place at the Stamford Innovation Center, located at the Old Town Hall, which is a new entrepreneurial hub in Stamford striving to create community-driven space and encouraging the free exchange of ideas and resources for start-up businesses. The perfect backdrop for Stephen Zacks’ talk on innovative urban art practices, the Stamford Innovation Center will join Franklin Street Works in hosting this free, public event.

As the Director of the Flint Public Art Project (FPAF), Stephen Zacks was one of three collaborators invited to participate in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, Strange Invitation (April 6 – June 16). This original Franklin Street Works show examines some of the relationships between art and activism that are happening around the country today. Zacks invited the emerging Flint artist collective Flower Tour to collaborate with him for the exhibition. Flower Tour blends fashion, performance, video and installation to bring color and excitement into public spaces. Their project is an extension of the FPAF’s mission, which, according to Zacks “draws on multiple artistic disciplines in an effort to transform the city’s image and identity, activate disused sites, connect places, and amplify the local culture.”

ABOUT STEPHEN ZACKS:

Flint Public Art Project founder and executive director Stephen Zacks is an internationally recognized architecture and urbanism reporter, theorist, and

1cultural producer based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and a native of Flint, Michigan. He received an M.A. in Liberal Studies from the New School for Social Research, served as an editor of Metropolis, and has received awards from the NY State Council on the Arts, Newtown Creek Fund, Graham Foundation, ArtPlace, MacDowell Colony, and the Warhol Foundation. Co-founder of the Bring to Light– Nuit Blanche New York festival, he is currently writing A Beautiful Ruin: The Generation that Transformed New York, 1967-1986, a nonfiction narrative about the role of contemporary artists in reinvigorating New York neighborhoods during the mid-70s fiscal crisis (Princeton Architectural Press, 2014).

ABOUT THE STAMFORD INNOVATION CENTER:

Featuring coworking, dedicated offices, conference facilities and a comprehensive slate of startup-centric classes and events, the Stamford Innovation Center, which opened in November 2012, is the ideal place for young enterprises to grow and interact with peers, mentors, investors, industry experts and service providers. For information on how to join our community, please visit www.stamfordicenter.com.

 

Honey Locust Tree Relocation, Saturday, May 4

Connecticut meet up 10:30 a.m. at Franklin Street Works and walk to train station or join us at Stamford Train Station for 11:03 train (third car from end). New York meet up between 12:30 and 1:00 pm at Clocktower Gallery.

SIGN UP TODAY by emailing Sandrine@franklinstreetworks.org!

There are 55 Honey Locust trees growing in New York City’s Zuccotti Park, the central locale of the 2011 Occupy Walls Street protests. Artist David Horvitz collected the seeds from those trees in 2012 and is now germinating them at New York’s Clocktower Gallery. On Saturday, May 4, after his Clocktower artist residency ends, Horvitz will lead 55 people in carrying the seedlings (one plant per person). The group (consisting of CT and NY participants) will take a Metro North train to Franklin Street Works, which is 40 minutes outside of NYC in Stamford, Connecticut. The plants will continue to germinate at Franklin Street Works through June 16.

For this collaborative performance, Franklin Street Works and David Horvitz are enlisting participants to help carry the trees from Clocktower Gallery to Connecticut, stopping off at nearby Zuccotti Park in route. Horvitz sees one person carrying one plant as a poetic component, adding, “I really like the image of someone going across the Atlantic in the 17th, 18th, 19th century, in a boat, carrying a small apple branch, or rose cutting, ready to plant it in America.”

In germinating the Honey Locust trees, David Horvitz also considers the temporality of trees explaining, “The slowness of their pace is not subject to the world of the instantaneous and the immediate that we live in.” These trees can live up to 150 years and will continue to germinate at Franklin Street Works during the Strange Invitation exhibition. In June, Horvitz and Franklin Street Works will find permanent homes for the trees, ideally at public institutions such as museums, libraries, and college campuses.

We still need participants! So Franklin Street Works hopes that you can join us in taking part in this collaborative performance and to bear witness to the relocation of these Honey Locust trees. Connecticut participants will meet up at Franklin Street Works at 10:30 am, while those living in NYC will meet up at 12:30 am at the Clocktower Gallery. To sign up and be a part of the performance please email your RSVP to Sandrine@franklinstreetworks.org. For information on FSW support and options in purchasing Metro North tickets, please email terri@franklinstreetworks.org.

ABOUT DAVID HORVITZ: David Horvitz is an artist from California who is currently based in Brooklyn. He works in a variety of media, including photography, video, web-based work, publications, and watercolor.

 

posted by Owner on May 4, 2013 at 10:30 am

Honey Locust Tree Relocation, Saturday, May 4

Connecticut meet up 10:30 a.m. at Franklin Street Works and walk to train station or join us at Stamford Train Station for 11:03 train (third car from end). New York meet up between 12:30 and 1:00 pm at Clocktower Gallery.

SIGN UP TODAY by emailing Sandrine@franklinstreetworks.org!

There are 55 Honey Locust trees growing in New York City’s Zuccotti Park, the central locale of the 2011 Occupy Walls Street protests. Artist David Horvitz collected the seeds from those trees in 2012 and is now germinating them at New York’s Clocktower Gallery. On Saturday, May 4, after his Clocktower artist residency ends, Horvitz will lead 55 people in carrying the seedlings (one plant per person). The group (consisting of CT and NY participants) will take a Metro North train to Franklin Street Works, which is 40 minutes outside of NYC in Stamford, Connecticut. The plants will continue to germinate at Franklin Street Works through June 16.

For this collaborative performance, Franklin Street Works and David Horvitz are enlisting participants to help carry the trees from Clocktower Gallery to Connecticut, stopping off at nearby Zuccotti Park in route. Horvitz sees one person carrying one plant as a poetic component, adding, “I really like the image of someone going across the Atlantic in the 17th, 18th, 19th century, in a boat, carrying a small apple branch, or rose cutting, ready to plant it in America.”

In germinating the Honey Locust trees, David Horvitz also considers the temporality of trees explaining, “The slowness of their pace is not subject to the world of the instantaneous and the immediate that we live in.” These trees can live up to 150 years and will continue to germinate at Franklin Street Works during the Strange Invitation exhibition. In June, Horvitz and Franklin Street Works will find permanent homes for the trees, ideally at public institutions such as museums, libraries, and college campuses.

We still need participants! So Franklin Street Works hopes that you can join us in taking part in this collaborative performance and to bear witness to the relocation of these Honey Locust trees. Connecticut participants will meet up at Franklin Street Works at 10:30 am, while those living in NYC will meet up at 12:30 am at the Clocktower Gallery. To sign up and be a part of the performance please email your RSVP to Sandrine@franklinstreetworks.org. For information on FSW support and options in purchasing Metro North tickets, please email terri@franklinstreetworks.org.

ABOUT DAVID HORVITZ: David Horvitz is an artist from California who is currently based in Brooklyn. He works in a variety of media, including photography, video, web-based work, publications, and watercolor.

 

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