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February 20, 2014 at 6:30 pm

Connecting Over Missed Connections: A Talk with New York Artist Ingrid Burrington

Please join us Thursday, February 20  from 6:30 – 8:00 pm for Ingrid Burrington’s Talk on her project, “The Center for Missed Connections”.

With Valentine’s Day, after seeing stores stock up with flowers, hearts and chocolate boxes, we are reminded that love is in the air. Feeling like we are missing out on this sort of love connection is at the core of Ingrid Burrington’s Center for Missed Connections project, which maps and studies loneliness and romantic longing in cities through the missed connections section of Craigslist. Join Franklin Street Works on Thursday, February 20 from 6:30 – 8:00 pm for “Connecting Over Missed Connections,” a conversation with New York-based artist, Ingrid Burrington. This free, public event also includes one complimentary Valentine’s Day cocktail for each guest!

The Center For Missed Connections project started with Burrington’s simple question, “What is the loneliest place in New York City?” As she started to do research, the missed connections sections of Craigslist seemed to be the perfect place to start. This section, exclusive to Craigslist, is a common zone of loneliness in print that is also a free-for-all dialogue of venting, longing, and spamming. Burrington explains, “Analysis of Craigslist Missed Connections postings and communities offers a glimpse into the loneliness and sexual tension that serve as the linchpin of any thriving metropolitan environment.” Read more about this project HERE.

Ingrid Burrington’s Taxonomy of Missed Connections, part of Center for Missed Connections, is a mapping of missed connections in New York City, and is currently on view in Franklin Street Works’ Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art show. The exhibition, curated by Taliesen Gilkes-Bower and Terri C Smith, is on view through March 9. The show explores “emergence,” the theory that says unforeseeable results happen when a system reaches a certain level of complexity. Exhibiting artists are: Kari Altmann, Christian Bök and Micah Lexier, Ingrid Burrington, Kaye Cain-Nielsen, Mircea Cantor, hint.fm, David Horvitz, Brian House and Jason Rabie, Juliana Huxtable, Thilde Jensen, Carolyn Lazard, M. M. Mantua, Preemptive Media, Robert Spahr, Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle’s Sexecology collaboration, and The Waterwhisper Ilse.

ABOUT INGRID BURRINGTON: Ingrid Burrington is an artist and writer living on a small island off the coast of America. There is more information about her at lifewinning.com

February 22, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Eat for Equity Event to Benefit Franklin Street Works

Eat For Equity Stamford is kicking off 2014 with a fun and exciting event benefitting Franklin Street Works! The dinner is Saturday, February 22 from 7:00 – 10:00 pm. The Exhibition “Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art” is on view during the event and features videos, sculptures, and photographs by artists working in New York City; Toronto, Canada; Paris, France; Providence, Rhode Island; and Carbondale, Illinois. The exhibition explores the theme of “emergence,” which posits that one cannot predict results of a system once it reaches a certain type and level of complexity.

Eat for Equity cooks will integrate some of the exhibition themes into their menu, which features breakfast for dinner! Come join us in enjoying good food, good people, good art, and good times! All are welcome to join with a suggested donation of $15-20 or give what you can! RSVP not required but helpful in estimating food. To RSVP, click HERE.

February 27, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Become Your Unlimited Self: Workshop and Talk with Diane Pauley

Become Your Unlimited Self is a workshop and talk that takes place on Thursday, February 7 from 7:00 – 9:00pm at Franklin Street Works. This event is in synch with Franklin Street Works’ tradition of highlighting emerging thinkers and doers in the region as part of our ongoing programming. Since graduating college, Diane Pauley, who goes by the “PostGrad Coach,” has watched her peers struggle to find jobs and then settle in positions that, according to Pauley “knocked the passion right out of them”.  This prompted her to start PostGradolescence, a coaching platform to teach millennials how to overcome their limited resources, make their art profitable and feel confident enough to be their own boss.  The event is both a talk, and a workshop.

About Diane Pauley: Diane Pauley is the PostGrad Coach who learned how to harness her art and do it for a living. She is now helping other millennials do the same – build up their art and be their own boss  – at Postgradolescence.com. Pauley works with creative millennials and teaches them how to make their art profitable. By adding the right business components to their message, Diane’s clients have been able to build up service-based businesses.

 

March 1, 2014 at 5:30 pm

An Evening with Artist Juliana Huxtable: Reading and Performance

On Saturday, March 1 from 5:30 – 7:30, please join us for a performative reading by Juliana Huxtable, one of the exhibiting artists in “Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art“.

Juliana Huxtable and a number of her NYC contemporaries will be reading and performing a diverse body of work that highlight new voices in New York’s growing underground. Themes of the body, technology and identity will be explored. Juliana Huxtable is a writer, artist and DJ based in New York City. She creates and speaks from the positions of cyborg, priestess, witch, and trans girl. Her writing has appeared or been referenced in ArtForumMousse, and Maker Magazine. She has read and performed at New York City venues such as Envoy Enterprises, Brooklyn Academy of Music and Artists Space. For more on Juliana Huxtable, check out this INTERVIEW.

March 8, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Closing Dance Party for the exhibition “Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art”

Franklin Street Works will host an exhibition closing party for “Neuromast”.  Co-curator Taliesin Gilkes-Bower and several exhibiting artists will be here to say goodbye to this group exhibition on Saturday, March 8 from 7:00 – 10:00 pm. With special extended hours, the party for Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art is a great opportunity to share Stamford’s contemporary art gem with friends and family. Come dance, snack, drink and check out this intriguing, original exhibition before it closes!

Taliesin Gilkes-Bower is a DJ and producer who has worked across the Western Hemisphere. He has DJ’d at such hot spots as the Wythe Hotel in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and has worked on music projects internationally. He will be joined by Sean Oloane (DJ OS), a Florida transplant whose been making some of the North Easts most essential stoner metal with his band Cool World. Both are fascinated by regional dance genres, autonomous musical ecologies, and post-ethnographic field recordings. They will be exploring their deep collections of analog and digital audio recordings.

Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art is an exhibition that explores “emergence,” the theory that says unforeseeable results happen when a system reaches a certain level of complexity. The show’s title is inspired by a very specific emergent phenomenon, “neuromast,” which is the sensory organ that allows fish to effectively behave in unison against the threat of predators. Neuromast features sculpture, videos, text-based works, photographs and more by contemporary artists, writers and theorists interested in theories of emergence.  Exhibiting artists are: Kari Altmann, Christian Bök and Micah Lexier, Ingrid Burrington, Kaye Cain-Nielsen, Mircea Cantor, hint.fm, David Horvitz, Brian House and Jason Rabie, Juliana Huxtable, Thilde Jensen, Carolyn Lazard, M. M. Mantua, Preemptive Media, Robert Spahr, Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle’s Sexecology collaboration, and The Waterwhisper Ilse. The exhibition is curated by Taliesin Gilkes-Bower and Terri C Smith and is on view through March 9, 2014.

March 13, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Fair Tomatoes: Documentary Film Screening and Discussion

Franklin Street Works is pleased to present the new documentary film Fair Tomatoes: A Story About Justice, Dignity, and Sustainability on Thursday, March 13 at 7:00 pm, followed by a Q & A with its directors, Ernie Zahn and Ron Williams. The 25-minute film focuses on the plight of farmworkers in Immokalee, Florida, and their organized efforts to correct abuses and wage issues that persist today. This free, public screening with the film’s directors invites the community to join in conversation about fair-food practices and workers’ rights. It’s an informative and inspiring event for everyone, including food lovers, consumer advocates, chefs, and civil liberties activists! Franklin Street Works will feature a tomato-inspired snack and each audience member will receive one complimentary beer or wine.

Immokalee, Florida, is the tomato capital of America, but it is also home to abuse, stagnant wages, mistreatment, and unjust labor conditions. In the last decade, the workers have organized the Coalition of Immokalee Workers. The group hopes to raise awareness about corporate social responsibility, community organizing, and sustainable food, while also ending modern-day slavery and other labor abuses. The film explores their efforts in Southwest Florida, but also addresses what restaurants, chefs, and consumers can do to support sustainable food practices.

Produced by All Kicker, the Greenwich-based arts and activism blog, in association with Taranta, a Boston North-end restaurant dedicated to socially responsible food practices, the film is currently on tour to increase the visibility of this issue and to continue to make the workers’ experience part of the conversation on sustainability.

This program precedes a related exhibition, “The Sunken Living Room,” which opens March 22 and focuses on labor, debt, banking and other issues surrounding the recession as seen through the work of fifteen contemporary artists.

ABOUT ERNIE ZAHN: Ernie Zahn is the current Executive Director of NPeaches. He began his media filmmaking career in high school with his first short film which went on to be screened in film festivals domestically and internationally. His skills in media merged with his activism shortly after college when he was hired by Mozilla Foundation to be a part of the organizing team for the Open Video Conference, an annual event focusing on issues such as digital rights, human rights and egalitarianism through online video. Ernie has since gone on to found a social justice non-profit that focuses in media, NPeaches – seving as the parent company to All Kicker.

ABOUT RON WILLIAMS: Ron Williams is a producer at NPeaches. Applying his skills in kendo, fencing, and other martial arts, Ron entered the film industry as a fight choreographer. He later moved in front of the camera as the host of the web series Ronaldo Tours, a food and travel series focuses on Italian culture in America. Ron has since moved into various roles in filmmaking through NPeaches as one of the organization’s founding members.

March 22, 2014 at 5:00 pm

The Sunken Living Room

ARCHIVE LINKS: Installation Photographs / Gallery Handout / Stamford Advocate Feature / WPKN Interview

The Sunken Living Room is an exhibition of contemporary art that investigates the most recent economic recession. The show’s title simultaneously reflects the interior design phenomenon of the lightly stepped down or “sunken” living room, popular during the 1970s recession, and the crash of the housing market in 2008. Using sculpture, video, texts, drawings, prints, and photos, artists working today tackle recession-related topics that include: labor, debt, the collapse of the housing market, post-industrial cityscapes, unemployment, and banking practices. The exhibition is curated by Terri C Smith and is on view March 22 – May 25, 2014.

“The Sunken Living Room” installation view.

Through a mix of documentation, observation, allegory, and autobiography, the twenty-four artists in this show lend unique perspectives to recent fiscal crises. Some take an individualized approach, overlaying their work with personal experiences and narratives as with Kirby Mages’ video Where’s the Proof? where she combines information on bank bailouts with diaristic voiceovers, or with Danna Vajda’s Tearsforfears installation where the artist uses her own crumpled receipts as source imagery to explore money spent that leaves no physical trace but the transaction’s record itself.

“The Sunken Living Room” installation view

Others in The Sunken Living Room capture current events by resituating elements from cities into the gallery, such as Anya Sirota + Akoaki’s Piranesian Bling series of sculptures that are modeled after disused elements at Detroit’s abandoned Packard plant; and Beate Geissler and Oliver Sann’s photo series, the real estate, which features images of foreclosed apartments in Chicago, Illinois. Documentary style works also are included in this exhibition. Ana Pečar & Oliver Ressler’s video In the Red follows the group “Strike Debt,” an offshoot of Occupy Wall Street that organizes events and protests relating to debt, and Kevin Jerome Everson follows two Cleveland men who repurpose alloys throughout the city to earn income in his film Fe26.

“The Sunken Living Room” installation view (cafe).

The exhibition is also imbedded with references to the 1970s, another recession era. Disco is front and center with Kerry Downey’s video Nursing Disco; workers rights and union slogans appear in Andrea Bower’s Workers Rights Posters; and seventies cinema informs the title of Olga Koumoundouros’ essay “The Getaway,” which is also the title of a 1972 film with Steve McQueen and Ali MacGraw. In the Franklin Street Works café, music from the mid and late-1970s, takeaways by Koumoudouros, and Jonah Emerson-Bell’s sculpture “This dude knows where you live” (which incorporates a Bootsy Collins album from 1978) touch on that decade’s popular culture landscape.

Thinking about artworks made during the 1970s recession, the site specificity of the city of Stamford, and in keeping with the exhibition’s themes of exchange and value, five artists were asked to recreate pieces from the UBS bank collection that date from the seventies. UBS has a corporate location in Stamford, Connecticut, and houses the largest stock exchange floor in the world — roughly the size of two American football fields. Each artist was paid a small honorarium to make an artwork by a blue chip artist that conjures art-as-investment, but in actuality has no monetary worth. This special project within the exhibition highlights economic themes surrounding art, including the subjective nature of an artwork’s value and the commissioning of artworks in exchange for payment.

Jonah Emerson-Bell, “The Losers Keeps America Clean,” installation view “The Sunken Living Room.”

By combining artworks from today with popular and high culture items from the past, The Sunken Living Room connects shared cultural experiences with contemporary projects to explore the utopic desires and deflating exasperation of post WWII recession economies. Exhibiting Artsits: Anya Sirota + Akoaki, Michael Bell-Smith, Andrea Bowers, Ingrid Burrington, Nancy Davenport, Kerry Downey, Jonah Emerson-Bell, Kevin Jerome Everson, Beate Geissler and Oliver Sann, Olga Koumoundouros, Urich Lau, Mads Lynnerup, Kirby Mages, Rainger Pinney, Oliver Ressler and Ana Pečar, Sal Randolph, Danna Vajda, and Constantina Zavitsanos, with special projects by Alberta Cifolelli, Roxanne Faber Savage, Peter Gramlich, Liz Squillace.


April 15, 2014 at 3:50 pm

Franklin Street Works interviewed on WPKN and a feature in the Stamford Advocate!

Franklin Street Works’ Creative Director Terri C Smith talks with Jennifer Bangser from the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County on WPKN. Click HERE to listen!

Also, check out Scott Gargan’s article on The Sunken Living Room HERE.

April 24, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Tour of “The Sunken Living Room” with the curator and four exhibiting artists, Thursday, April 24 at 7pm

On Thursday, April 24 at 7:00 pm there is a guided tour of the current group exhibition, The Sunken Living Room. Those in attendance will walk through the show with the show’s curator, Terri C Smith, and four exhibiting artists: Michael Bell-Smith, Jonah Emerson-Bell, Danna Vajda and Constantina Zavitsanos. While touring the three galleries, artists will discuss their works, including how videos and installations reflect themes in the exhibition and fit in with their overall practice. The evening will end with an open discussion and reception in the café. Please join us for this free event that is open to the public – a unique opportunity to explore the current show with emerging figures in contemporary art!

ABOUT THE PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

Michael Bell-Smith in an artist based in Brooklyn, NY. His work has been exhibited and screened in museums and galleries internationally, including MoMA PS1, NY; Museum of The Moving Image, NY; SFMOMA, San Francisco; The 2008 Liverpool Biennial, UK; The 5th Seoul International Media Biennale; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, ES; The New Museum, NY; Hirshhorn Museum, DC; Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; MoMA, NY; and Tate Liverpool, UK. His work has been featured in Art Forum, Art in America and the New York Times. He is an Assistant Professor of New Media at Purchase College.

Photo by Garen Barsegian

Jonah Emerson-Bell is a sculptor who lives and works in Brooklyn NY. By using a variety of materials including found objects, bronze and neon, his work deals with themes ranging from history to humor, from economy to witchcraft. He was part of the Shadow Shop exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and his work was featured on the cover of the summer 2010 issue of Bookforum. He was involved in the Music Box project in New Orleans in 2011.

Danna Vajda is an artist and writer based in Brooklyn, New York. Recent exhibitions include both institutional spaces and provisional, less institutional spaces.

Constantina Zavitsanos is an artist whose practice engages the sculptural surfaces and temporalities of performance, text, projection and sound. She works with concepts of intimacy, consent, and contraction–especially as related to debt and dependency. Zavitsanos attended the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, and has shared work at Slought Foundation in Philadelphia, with Cage at MoMA PS1, and at the Hessel Museum at Bard College.

 

May 24, 2014 at 6:00 pm

The Sunken Living Room — Closing Party with Performance by Danna Vajda

Franklin Street Works is hosting a free, public closing party for “The Sunken Living Room” exhibition on Saturday, May 24 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm. The party will include a bar tending themed performance by exhibiting artist Danna Vajda at 7:00 pm.

Enjoy bar snacks, free wine, music while viewing this original, group exhibition that features artists exploring the recession through video, text, printmaking, sculpture, and photography. For more on the exhibition click HERE. To read the Stamford Advocate article on the show click HERE.

Danna Vajda’s performance is titled “thewateringhole” and takes the premise of the post-work drink, the beer, the glass of wine, the cocktail, the shot that creates a possible momentary breakage between a day’s work and oneself outside of work. The performance entails the mixing and serving of a series of classic drinks and cocktails while using a set of institutional letterhead paintings as recipe cue cards. The recipes contents bring together classic ingredients such as aromatic bitters or a cube of sugar, with exhaustion, muddled contradictions, always shaken, stirred and strained. Much like an instructional video, recipes are read aloud, the drinks mixed, served and then on to the next drink. Each recipe functions as an encrypted resignation letter signaling an impasse in the relation between individual and institutional identity.

Danna Vajda, is an artist and writer, born in Vancouver, Canada and based in Brooklyn,
New York. Recent exhibitions include both institutional spaces and provisional, less institutional spaces.

June 7, 2014 at 5:00 pm

Showing the Work

“Showing the Work,” an exhibition curated by Sarah Fritchey, will be on view at Franklin Street Works June 7 through August 31.  For related performances see our June calendar.

At a moment when major art museums regularly program experimental dance on their premises, “Showing the Work” evaluates the stakes of this exchange.  The exhibition brings together eight artists whose work explores the meeting place between the artist, the performance and the audience and demonstrates how time-specific events might be meaningfully exhibited in the gallery over a multi-week period.  Six of the artists will perform a one-night-only performance during the show’s run, which will culminate in a roundtable discussion on the final day.

“Showing the Work” asks: How can the live, transitory qualities of a dance be represented during this exhibition? How does the “white cube” facilitate a critical analysis of artist-audience interaction that traditional “black box” theaters do not? How can the works on display resonate qualities of the performing body? How might choreography be understood as a visual manifestation that is alive with the possibility for change, truth, intimacy, and exchange?

The exhibition features artists working inside and out of the dance fieldwho design individual systems of choreography to generate new work.  Many of these works will be on view to the public for the first time and aim to introduce the audience to terminology from the dance field, as well as to show the physical and mental work of dance.  The exhibition also rethinks a performance as one of an infinite set of outcomes, a living form that much like the body is in a constant state of change.

Likewise, the work on display will act more like a live body than video documentation and include: a floor-to-wall-to-ceiling pattern that is the map for a duet, a video that simultaneously presents four versions of the same dance performed in different spaces over the course of a year, artist notebooks that contain scores for emoting sound and recognizable language, a gaming device that proposes consumerism as a form of choreography, text/object combinations that prompt viewers to become collaborators in a recorded performance, and a lecture that critically interprets an early dance work anew.

Exhibiting artists include:Jen McGinn and iele paloumpis, Robert Morris, Claudia La Rocco, Carolee Schneeman, Mårten Spångberg, Tatyana Tenenbaum, and Gillian Walsh.

 

June 27, 2014 at 6:45 pm

Tatyana Tenenbaum and Claudia La Rocco Performances

As part of the exhibition “Showing the Work,” curated by Sarah Fritchey, Franklin Street Works is presenting two free, public performances on Friday, June 27, featuring by Tatyana Tenenbaum and Claudia Rocco.

Friday, June 27 at 7:15pm, Tatyana and Ezra Tenenbaum perform “Prologue” from Private Country 
“Prologue” from Private Country is a duet created over the course of 2 1/2 years by siblings Ezra and Tatyana Tenenbaum.  The 14-minute was the result of embodied research into the continuum between spoken word and pitched singing.  The duet also serves as an overture or entr-acteto the evening length work Private Country, which Tatyana Tenenbaum describes as “a re-construction of American musical theater through my subjective memory, history and aesthetic desires.” For more on Tenenbaum, click HERE.
Friday, June 27 at 8:15pm, Claudia La Rocco performs “I just need one word and I can tell you everything” 
“Your hands are in fists, clenching; you are up on relevé with one foot in front and your flat back slides over an invisible horizontal plane. Don’t think about disaster. Don’t think about what his hands felt like against your thighs.”  I just need one word and I can tell you everything attempts to map the collision of internal and external realities. This is a solo performance in language, in which the body of the performer is rendered only through text. Running Time roughly 25 minutes.
June 28, 2014 at 7:00 pm

iele paloumpis and Jen McGinnis perform “not unordered and not resembling”

Saturday, June 28

7:00 pm: iele paloumpis, Jen McGinn and Joanna Groom perform not unordered and not resembling

not unordered and not resembling is an episodic journey through memory, disorientation, and altered states of consciousness. Mapping through tape and sound provides a landscape for movement to reveal individual and collective experiences. Through live performance Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis, and Joanna Groom create a nonlinear structure in which all ideas have the possibility of connecting to all other ideas.

 

July 12, 2014 at 4:00 pm

Kent “Wood” Evans Performance

Kent “Wood” Evans, who has performed internationally at venues such as the Acadamie Beaux Arts in Paris and the Nuvorican Poets Café in Greenwich Village, will be at Franklin Street Works for a free impromptu performance while he is visiting his hometown of Stamford, Connecticut. The event is this Saturday, July 12 from 4:00 – 6:00 pm. It will feature Evans sharing songs from his new album from 4:00 – 5:00 pm followed by a short Q &A and a reception with the writer and musicians in the Franklin Street Works café.

Video still from “Too Many Nights @Nuyorican” by Kent Evans

Evans performed at Franklin Street Works in 2012, reading from his critically acclaimed book “A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots.” For this event he will present a sneak peak of his video for “Too Many Nights @Nuyorican,” which is seven minutes in length and will debut at the Guanajuato International Film Festival July 31st. The author, musician and filmmaker will also perform several tracks from his new album with Dust Industry, which is his self-described “Mexican spoken word, stoner rock project” that features Evans on guitar/lyrics, Michael Severens on cello, and Drew Trudeau on bass.

More on Kent Evans:

Half Cantonese and half UK, Kent Evans was born in New York City in 1975 and grew up between New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

He graduated in psychology and dramatic literature from New York University, and began traveling extensively throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. He is currently based in Guanajuato, Mexico.

July 17, 2014 at 6:30 pm

Curator Tour of “Showing the Work” with Sarah Fritchey

Franklin Street Works will host a curator tour of “Showing the Work” on Thursday, July 17 from 6:30 – 8:00 pm with Sarah Fritchey. The tour will give visitors a rare opportunity to explore the art in Franklin Street Works galleries with the show’s creator in a casual setting. Fritchey will discuss the impulse for the show, the exhibition’s themes, and the challenges and successes of performance in a gallery setting. Join us for this free, public event to learn more about experimental dance and choreography in contemporary art. This event is made possible, in part, through a two-year grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts.

Sarah Fritchey giving a member tour at the preview party for “Showing the Work”

Over the eight months preceding the exhibition, Fritchey met with the artists to discuss their practices and their various distances to the visual arts world. While many of the artists arrived with academic training in dance, music and writing, none had come from a studio practice or visual arts background. Fritchey will discuss the greatest challenge of this show — asking a choreographer or language maker to create something — to make an object or environment that would remain on display in an art space. These insights will explain the audio elements of the show, as well as the interactive components.  A group “hand dance” inspired by the influential dancer, Yvonne Rainer, will take place at end of the tour.

“Showing the Work” is an exhibition that explores experimental dance in the gallery setting and challenges our expectations of the gallery experience. The show brings together eight New York City based dancers whose work explores the meeting place between the artist, the performance and the audience and demonstrates how time-specific events might be meaningfully exhibited in the gallery over a multi-week period. Showing the work asks: How can live, transitory qualities of a dance be represented during the exhibition? How does the gallery facilitate a critical analysis of artist-audience interaction that a theatre does not?  Five of the artists performed one-night-only performances at Franklin Street Works during the first four weeks of the twelve-week run that activated their installations in the galleries.

Gillian Walsh performing at the opening reception for “Showing the Work”

Exhibiting artists include Jen McGinn and iele paloumpis, Robert Morris, Claudia La Rocco, Carolee Schneeman, Mårten Spångberg, Tatyana Tenenbaum, and Gillian Walsh.  Showing the Work is on view through August 31, 2014.

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Sarah Fritchey is an active freelance curator who explores the tension between choreography and improvisation as it relates to site and the act of meeting. She is the Visual Arts Coordinator at Artspace New Haven and a contributing writer to ArtForum’s Critcs’ Picks, The New Haven Advocate, and Art New England. She contributed as a research assistant to the 2013 Venice Biennial, the 50th Anniversary show at the ICA Philadelphia, Liam Gillick: 199A-199B at The Hessel Museum of Art, and Dangerous Beauty at The Chelsea Museum of Art.

August 15, 2014 at 6:30 pm

Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis and Joanna Groom Second Performance of Original Work

Friday, August 15 at 6:30 pm Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis and Joanna Groom perform again in Franklin Street Works’ upstairs gallery.

The piece, not unordered and not resembling was created by McGinn and paloumpis, who are Brooklyn-based choreographers. Originally performed on Saturday, June 28, at Franklin Street Works, the 40-minute piece provides a landscape for movement, revealing individual and collective experiences. This free, public performance is part of Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, “Showing the Work” curated by Sarah Fritchey, and is sponsored, in part, by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The evening will end with a post-performance discussion with the artists.

McGinn and paloumpis’ movement practice includes choreography and improvisation as a way to explore experiences in the present moment. For their second performance of not unordered in not resembling, they are interested in investigating how the work and their dancing will change depending on audience, time, and the present experience. iele paloumpis explains, “through performance we learn a little bit more about what the work is doing each time we show it.” Jen McGinn and iele paloumpis are also fascinated by the prospect of deepinging their performance via audience feedback during the post-performance Q & A.

Using recorded and live sound, and a taped map created specifically for Franklin Street Works’ first floor gallery, the dance piece creates a nonlinear structure in which all ideas have the possibility of connecting to all other ideas. The taped floor pattern used by the performers is unique to the architecture of Franklin Street Works, making the choreography at this venue unlike any past or future performances. The site specificity of the work means it is the last chance to see this exact work live.

not unordered in not resembling will be performed for a second and final time by Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis and Joanna Groom in Franklin Street Works’ upstairs gallery on Friday, August 15th at 6:30 pm.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Jen McGinn received her B.A. and M.F.A in Dance from Hollins University in partnership with the ADF. Her work and teaching practices have been shaped through residencies at Dickinson College, Hollins University, Booker High School Visual and Performing Arts Center, ADF, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, West Coast Civic Ballet, Dance Theater Workshop, nEW Festival, and the University of Maryland, among others. She currently co-directs the Summer Institute in Dance at the University of the Arts in addition to being a visiting lecturer, is a Dance Specialist for ”Life Lines” Community Arts Project, is the Studio Manager at the Center for Performance Research and is a Movement Research AIR. Her interests include Cecchetti ballet, magical thinking, and logic problems. www.jenmcginndance.com

iele paloumpis is a trans*/queer dance artist, choreographer, and teacher navigating invisible disabilities and class disparities in NYC. At the center of their practice are ideas exploring body politics and artistic self-empowerment.


September 6, 2014 at 12:00 pm

It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information

Exhibition Archive: INSTALLATION PHOTOGRAPHS // INTRO & CHECKLIST // GALLERY HANDOUT // PRESS RELEASE // DAVID HORVITZ MAIL ART CALL RSVP LIST // PDF OF DAVID HORVITZ MAIL ART CALL WORKS

Franklin Street Works presents It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information, an exhibition featuring artists’ projects that engage the postal system and its intersections with digital communications media. The artists in It Narratives find forms for everyday experiences of distance and time by reflecting on the way objects move through information networks. The exhibition is curated by New York-based guest curators Brian Droitcour and Zanna Gilbert and is on view from September 6 – November 9, 2014.

With areas of expertise in mail art (Gilbert) and Internet art (Droitcour), the curators take into consideration how Internet technology and digital forms of commerce have changed the way artists use the postal system. Mail art emerged in the late 1960s as a collective, networked medium allowing artists to circulate and exchange works and ideas in a sphere uncontrolled by curators, institutions, the art market, or state censorship. Today, mail is employed less frequently as an artistic medium, in keeping with an overall shift in how information is experienced and exchanged. News and greetings from friends and family have migrated from the postal system to the faster networks of email and social media, yet “snail mail” has not become obsolete. Sending objects over great distances is part of online commerce. Print-on-demand services that allow users to design their own T-shirts, books, or mugs with a few clicks of a mouse connect Internet browsing and data input to receiving objects by mail and handling them in everyday life.

It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information takes its title from a prose genre popular in the late 18th century, the “it-narrative.” These were accounts of objects circulating in the structures of emergent industrialized capitalist markets written in the first-person from the perspective of the objects. It Narratives the exhibition updates this concept for the 21st century by presenting artists’ projects that track the movement of objects online and by mail, taking measure of the physical and emotional experiences of time and distance inherent to these networks.

Participants include: Greg Allen, Tyler Coburn, Tim Devin, Yevgeniy Fiks, Lukas Geronimas, Frank Heath, David Horvitz, Jean Keller, Alexandra Lerman, Kristin Lucas, Cat Mazza, Kristina Lee Podesva and Alan McConchie, Paul Soulellis, Emily Spivack, The Thread, Ehren Tool, Print All Over Me, Forms of Melancholy, Lance Wakeling, Roberto Winter.

ABOUT THE CURATORS:

Brian Droitcour is a writer, translator, curator, critic, and a PhD candidate in comparative literature at New York University. Previous exhibition projects include “BFFA3AE – DTR” at 47 Canal in New York and “Big Reality” at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn. He has contributed reviews and essays to Artforum, Art in America, and Rhizome, among other publications. He has been yelping since January 2012 and his account was awarded Elite status last year. His web site fifteenstars.com, a collection of found Yelp reviews with commissioned illustrations and an accompanying essay, was featured as part of the New Museum’s First Look series of online exhibitions in October 2013. Among other projects, Brian is currently editing Klaus_ebooks, a series of artists’ ebooks published by Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery.

Zanna Gilbert is a postdoctoral fellow at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York and she holds a PhD from the University of Essex and Tate Research in the UK. Her research focuses on artists’ networks and the transnational circulation of art through the mail. She curated the exhibitions Felipe Ehrenberg: Works from the Tate Archive (2009), Intimate Bureaucracies: Art and the Mail (2011), Contested Games: Mexico 68’s Design Revolution (2012), Daniel Santiago: Brazil is my Abyss (MAMAM, Recife, 2012; MAC-Niteroi, Rio, 2014) and Edgardo Antonio Vigo: The Unmaker of Objects (MoMA, 2014). She has taught postgraduate courses at the University of Essex, UK and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).

ABOUT OUR SPONSORS

This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Thank you to our in-kind sponsor, MakerBot Store, Greenwich, CT. MakerBot is leading the Next Industrial Revolution by setting the standard in reliable and affordable desktop 3D printing, scanning, and entertainment. MakerBot Store, Greenwich, CT is located at 200 Greenwich Avenue, Greenwich CT, 06830.

October 9, 2014 at 12:15 pm

MakerBot 3D Printing Demonstration

On Thursday, October 9 from 6:00 – 7:30 pm MakerBot will give a 3D printing demonstration and talk followed by a Q&A session. This demo will include a MakerBot company overview, a 3D printer demonstration, more on their retail stores, and information on how their printers work, with an overview of each printer. They will also share some customer use cases and great MakerBot stories. The event is free and open to the public.

The demonstration and talk are programming for the current Franklin Street Works exhibition It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information, which features, among other things, print on demand items, including several 3D prints. MakerBot is the official 3D printing sponsor of the show.

It Narratives explores the intersection between modern digital communications media and the traditional postal system. The artists in It Narratives find forms for everyday experiences of distance and time by reflecting on the way objects move through information networks. The exhibition is curated by New York-based guest curators Brian Droitcour and Zanna Gilbert. It is on view through November 9th at Franklin Street Works.

Exhibiting artists include: Greg Allen, Tyler Coburn, Tim Devin, Yevgeniy Fiks, Lukas Geronimas, Frank Heath, David Horvitz, Jean Keller, Alexandra Lerman, Kristin Lucas, Cat Mazza, Kristina Lee Podesva and Alan McConchie, Paul Soulellis, Emily Spivack, The Thread, Ehren Tool, Print All Over Me, Forms of Melancholy, Lance Wakeling, Roberto Winter.

About MakerBot:

MakerBot, a subsidiary of Stratasys Ltd., is leading the next industrial revolution by setting the standards in reliable and affordable desktop 3D printing. Founded in 2009, MakerBot sells desktop 3D printers to innovative and industry-leading customers worldwide, including engineers, architects, designers, educators and consumers. To learn more about MakerBot, visit www.makerbot.com.

October 18, 2014 at 4:00 pm

“It Narratives” Curator, Zanna Gilbert, Talks About Mail Art and Exhibiting Artist, Lance Wakeling, Screens Video

On Saturday, October 18, there is a talk by independent curator Zanna Gilbert and a video screening by artist Lance Wakeling in conjuction with the current exhibition It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information. The event is free and open to the public. The talk will be presented from 4:00 – 5:00 pm, followed by a refreshment intermission, and the screening from 6:00 -7:00 pm. Audiences are welcome to join for all or part, depending on their schedules and interests.

Zanna Gilbert will be discussing the history of mail art in relation to the themes of the current exhibition It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information (co-curated by Gilbert & Brian Droitcour). It Narratives explores the intersection between modern digital communications media and the traditional postal system.

Video artist Lance Wakeling, whose video A Tour of the AC-1 Transatlantic Submarine Cable is currently on view as part of It Narratives, will present excerpts from his trilogy of essay videos about the physicality of the network. Since 2011, Wakeling has been producing a series of video essays that explores the physical and social landscapes of the Internet.

It Narratives is on view through November 9th at Franklin Street Works. Participating artists include: Greg Allen, Tyler Coburn, Tim Devin, Yevgeniy Fiks, Lukas Geronimas, Frank Heath, David Horvitz, Jean Keller, Alexandra Lerman, Kristin Lucas, Cat Mazza, Kristina Lee Podesva and Alan McConchie, Paul Soulellis, Emily Spivack, The Thread, Ehren Tool, Print All Over Me, Forms of Melancholy, Lance Wakeling, Roberto Winter.

About the Curator: Zanna Gilbert is a postdoctoral fellow at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York and she holds a PhD from the University of Essex and Tate Research in the UK. Her research focuses on artists’ networks and the transnational circulation of art through the mail. She curated the exhibitions Felipe Ehrenberg: Works from the Tate Archive (2009), Intimate Bureaucracies: Art and the Mail (2011), Contested Games: Mexico 68’s Design Revolution (2012), and Edgardo Antonio Vigo: The Unmaker of Objects (MoMA, 2014).

About the Artist: Lance Wakeling (1980) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. His recent films include “Views of a Former Verizon Building,” “Subida al cielo,” “A Tour of the AC-1 Transatlantic Submarine Cable,” and “Field Visits for Chelsea Manning,” which premiers late winter 2014. His artworks and videos have been shown at Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing; Supplement Gallery, London; NiMK, Amsterdam; The Woodmill, London; Import Projects, Berlin; Capricious Gallery, Brooklyn; and Future Gallery, Berlin.

 

October 23, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Artist Talk by Frank Heath

Exhibiting artist Frank Heath will give a talk in conjuction with the current exhibition “It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information.” The event is free and open to the public and will take place at Franklin Street Works Thursday, October 23rd from 7:00 – 8:30pm.

This event will begin with a screening of a short video work by artist Frank Heath, titled “Asymptomatic Carrier” (2013). The video focuses on a defunct quarantine hospital on North Brother Island, the frequently overlooked next-door neighbor of Randall’s Island. “Asymptomatic Carrier” was featured earlier this year as part of the program “A Tale of Two Islands” by High Line Art, in New York, NY.

This video reflects some of the themes of Heath’s Bcc works, in which sculpture components are mailed to defunct locales on New York’s lesser-known islands. Sculptures and photographs from Heath’s Bcc series are on view as part of Franklin Street Works’ current group exhibition “It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information. Heath will be in conversation with one of the show’s curators, Zanna Gilbert, to discuss these works within the wider context of his practice.

 

November 8, 2014 at 4:00 pm

It Narratives: Curator Tour and Mailbox Inauguration, Closing Weekend

For the closing weekend of “It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information” Franklin Street Works will host a curator led tour of the show with Brian Droitcour and Zanna Gilbert as well as a festive inauguration of the space’s new mailbox, which was created by artist Lukas Geronimas. The event is free and open to the public and takes place at Franklin Street Works Saturday, November 8th from 4:00 – 7:00pm

Curator and critic Brian Droitcour and curator and researcher Zanna Gilbert will share their thinking behind the show It Narratives: How Objects Move as Information, which considers how the Internet and traditional post intersect in contemporary art. They will also discuss works on view  during a casual walkthrough of the galleries. After the tour, the curators, Franklin Street Works staff and the exhibiting artists on hand will inaugurate Franklin Street Works’ new mailbox. A work of art commissioned for this exhibition, “The Custom Postboxis a functioning, glowing mailbox made by Brooklyn sculptor Lukas Geronimas. Artist David Horvitz will also be on site to inform visitors about his “It Narratives” project “Mail Art Call @ Franklin Street Works,” which is an open mail art call that received 580 responses from across the globe.

The artists in It Narratives find forms for everyday experiences of distance and time by reflecting on the way objects move through information networks. It Narratives is on view through November 9th at Franklin Street Works. Artists include: Greg Allen, Tyler

Coburn, Tim Devin, Yevgeniy Fiks, Lukas Geronimas, Frank Heath, David Horvitz, Jean Keller, Alexandra Lerman, Kristin Lucas, Cat Mazza, Kristina Lee Podesva and Alan McConchie, Paul Soulellis, Emily Spivack, The Thread, Ehren Tool, Print All Over Me, Forms of Melancholy, Lance Wakeling, Roberto Winter.

Brian Droitcour is a writer, translator, curator, critic, and a PhD candidate in comparative literature at New York University. Previous exhibition projects include “BFFA3AE – DTR” at 47 Canal in New York and “Big Reality” at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn. He has contributed reviews and essays to Artforum, Art in America, and Rhizome, among other publications. He has been yelping since January 2012 and his account was awarded Elite status last year. His web site fifteenstars.com, a collection of found Yelp reviews with commissioned illustrations and an accompanying essay, was featured as part of the New Museum’s First Look series of online exhibitions in October 2013. Among other projects, Brian is currently editing Klaus_ebooks, a series of artists’ ebooks published by Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery.

Zanna Gilbert is a postdoctoral fellow at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York and she holds a PhD from the University of Essex and Tate Research in the UK. Her research focuses on artists’ networks and the transnational circulation of art through the mail. She curated the exhibitions “Felipe Ehrenberg: Works from the Tate Archive” (2009), “Intimate Bureaucracies: Art and the Mail” (2011), “Contested Games: Mexico 68’s Design Revolution” (2012), “Daniel Santiago: Brazil is my Abyss” (MAMAM, Recife, 2012; MAC-Niteroi, Rio, 2014) and “Edgardo Antonio Vigo: The Unmaker of Objects” (MoMA, 2014). She has taught postgraduate courses at the University of Essex, UK and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).

Lukas Geronimas was born in Toronto, Ontario. He received a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of British Columbia, and an MFA from the Milton Avery School at Bard College. His art is about manufacturing openings. It is also about value, in that an artwork should be created to live within the studio, the exhibition, and the collection; with each context comes a separate evaluation, and Lukas thinks an artwork is most meaningful when it is responsible for them all. Lukas currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

David Horvitz was born in California in 1982 and lives in Brooklyn, NY. Recent solo exhibitions include: concurrent shows at Jan Mot, Brussels, and Dawid Radziszewski Gallery, Warsaw; Peter Amby, Copenhagen; Statements, Art Basel; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; and Chert, Berlin. His work has been shown at EVA International 2014, Glasgow International 2014, LIAF 2013, MoMA, The Kitchen, and the New Museum. In New York, he has realized projects with Recess, Clocktower Gallery, post at MoMA, Printed Matter, Rhizome, and Triple Canopy.

November 22, 2014 at 5:00 pm

About Like So: The Influence of Painting

Exhibition Materials: Installation photographs // Gallery Handout // Artcritical Review // Review in UConn, Stamford, Student Magazine.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is a group exhibition that explores how the histories, forms, materials and other qualities associated with painting inform conceptual art practices today. The show is on view at Franklin Street Works from November 22, 2014, through February 22, 2015.

The exhibition, curated by Terri C Smith, aims, in part, to challenge expectations of painting, which are often attached to historic movements, decorative qualities or romantic notions of the artist in his or her studio. “About Like So” features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other art forms. This exhibition asks, “In an era where painting no longer has the art historical primacy it once did, what can it contribute to the dominant art practices of today – art that is often not medium specific and is rooted in the theory-driven practices of conceptual art?”

The works include sculptures, videos, photographs, sound installations, and digital prints. Loose and disjointed narratives involving the histories and materiality of painting are found in several videos: Ragnheiour Gestsdottir’s video “As If We Existed,” portrays the fictitious

melodrama of a figurative painter working in Venice; Tameka Norris’s “Purple Painting” incorporates makeup and food in a provocative video that, with few words, touches on issues surrounding race, gender and the pressures of an art historical canon; in Alex Hubbard’s video “Hit Wave II,” a magician gives instructions for tricks, but the sounds and activities surrounding him allude to action painting with Hubbard in the background wearing a paint suit and creating gestural marks with spray paint.

Sculptures by Brad Tucker, Dave Hardy, and Taylor Davis also show painting’s influence. In one of Tucker’s box sculptures, “Potholder,” he incorporates a homemade-style woven potholder that mimics mid-century, shaped abstract painting while crossed bars in the box’s back reference hanging devices (hooks, wires, D-rings) usually hidden by the museum wall. In his sculptures, Dave Hardy uses pigment, cement-infused foam, glass, metal and other materials, combining them so it seems as though abstract wall works have sprung into three dimensions in the form of sophisticatedly constructed sculptures that intentionally appear unwieldy or precarious. Taylor Davis’s “TBOX No. 1” sculpture is a small double-stacked construction of birch plywood that sits directly on the floor and appears to have blue painters tape marking it with lines and arrows. In reality, the “tape” is painted on, creating an optical illusion that conjures trompe l’oeil painting.

Several works speak to painting through audio components. An installation by Australian artist Michael Graeve considers abstract painting via painted blocks of color and tonal audio overlays. Thinking about his sound work as an audio parallel to the painterly practice of translating information from the world onto a surface in the studio, Augustus Thompson’s installation combines sounds from the studio, outside noises and constructed harmonies into what the artist considers a “sound painting.” The collaborative sound and painting performance by K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens “in actu music & painting,” created in 1993 and produced by Institute for Music and Acoustics of the Center for Art and Media, ZKM Karlsruhe, Germany, is the earliest work in the exhibition. It melds action painting with performed experimental music, providing a foundation for thinking about the many ways painting combines with other media in “About Like So.”

A handful of artists in the exhibition reference particular art historical figures or classic painting genres. In Paul Branca’s “Untitled, for Rodchenko,” he combines monochrome paintings in the style of Alexander Rodchenko with tote bags and tags. Sophy Naess’s gestural soap pieces began with a prompt to respond to abstract expressionist Hans Hoffman’s work. Composed of body friendly materials, scents, and pigments, these pieces address the fraught painting subject known as the bather. In their version of TV painter Bob Ross’s show “The Joy of Painting,” Peter Nowogrodzki and Max Kotelchuck’ YouTube video follows Ross’s instructions to make a landscape painting using a computer program rather than paint and brush. Polly Apfelbaum’s abstract fabric sculpture, “Split Station Stop,” hangs from the ceiling and was inspired by her stay in Rome with its abundance of Catholic-themed artworks, specifically the Stations of the Cross. In Tim Davis’s “Permanent Collection” series he takes photographs of classic paintings ranging from still lifes to religious, using the light of the camera’s flash to obscure bits of the composition and/or bring surface qualities, such as brush strokes and crackling, of the physical object to light.

Computer generated works by Seth Price, Paul Theriault, and Siebren Versteeg incorporate canned digital effects, flat bed scanners, and Google image search respectively. With Seth Price’s “Digital Video Effects: Spills,” the artist layers digitally imposed black “spills” that ebb and flow over artist Joan Jonas’s video featuring a conversation on the commercialization of art between art dealer Joseph Helman and conceptual artists Robert Smithson and Richard Serra. Paul Theriault paints directly onto scanner beds and then scans the composition, allowing for the occasional burst of scanner light to peak through the “painting.” Siebren Versteeg enters his algorithm paintings (abstract paintings produced using code) into the computer and prompts a Google image search to find a “concrete” image, which is hung just to the right. Rather than taking a realistic image and abstracting it, the computer conjures representational images based on an abstract composition, turning the usual dynamic between the representational and the abstract upside down.

Paintings are also included in the exhibition, but the artists use strategies that challenge our expectations of painting’s forms or the artist’s role as author. In Leslie Wayne’s “Paint/Rag” series, the artist plays with perception and a linguistic idea that’s embedded in the title (paint – slash – rag) by removing the layered paint off of one support and draping it over another, making it appear as if it were hung on a hook like a piece of fabric or an ordinary rag. John Knuth’s abstract paintings resemble the splattered layers of a Jackson Pollock painting, but are the result of Knuth relinquishing authorship to a business of flies that excrete the paint he feeds them onto paper. Obscuring elements of a book with paint to reconfigure artist books, Marley Freeman inserts abstraction that, much like an analogue companion for Price’s video, obscures and highlights texts and images in these artist books, in part, as a commentary on painting’s decorative associations and the influence of modernism on the medium.

Exhibiting artists: Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley
Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, and “in actu: music & painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

December 4, 2014 at 6:00 pm

SPECTRUM and Franklin Street Works Present: a panel on gender identity with artists Kerry Downey, Leon Finley, Juliana Huxtable, and iele paloumpis

For the Fall 2014 semester, UConn Stamford’s LGBTQ/ALLY Group SPECTRUM has been engaging the campus community in a series of diverse conversations about gender. To continue this dialogue, SPECTRUM, in collaboration with Franklin Street Works, will be presenting a panel discussion that includes four trans*/non-binary identitfied artists Kerry Downey, Leon Finley, Juliana Huxtable, and iele paloumpis on Thursday, December, 4th from 6:00-8:00pm at the UConn Stamford Campus Art Gallery. In addition to the panel, a daylong pop-up gallery of digital works by the participating artists will be on view at UConn Stamford Campus Art Gallery from 1-5pm for those interested in learning more. Two thirty-minute tours will be given at 2pm and 4pm by the organizers of the event before the panel discussion begins at 6:00pm. The installation and event are free and open to the public. The UConn, Stamford, art gallery located at 1 University Place. Stamford, CT 06901.

This conversation comes at a time when SPECTRUM and the LGBTQ community at UConn Stamford have worked to successfully allocate two gender-neutral bathrooms on campus, ensuring that trans* and gender nonconforming students, faculty, and staff feel safe and protected. Many don’t realize that bathrooms are highly gendered spaces, and, as such, places of gender policing. The panel conversation will encourage students think complexly about the ways in which artists use their work as a platform to explore and raise questions surrounding gender identity.

About the Artists:

Kerry Downey (born 1979, Florida) is an interdisciplinary artist and teacher based in New York City. Her work is driven by questions of queerness, support, collaboration and the relationship between private emotion and political consciousness. She holds a BA from Bard College and an MFA from Hunter College.  She has recently shown at Taylor Macklin (Zurich), Franklin Street Works (Stamford, CT), CCS at Bard College, Columbia University (NY), Invisible Dog (Brooklyn), A.I.R Gallery (Brooklyn), The Bronx River Arts Center, Spectacle Theater (Brooklyn), and NURTUREart (Brooklyn).

Downey’s work received a Critic’s Pick in Artforum, and has appeared The Brooklyn Rail, the New Yorker, and the New York Times. This past June, Downey curated Failing to Levitate at The EFA Project Space with Natasha Marie Llorens. She was a Queer/Art/Mentorship Fellow in 2012-13 and is a current participant in the Drawing Center’s Open Sessions. Downey teaches at the Museum of Modern Art and Hunter College Art Department in New York City.

Leon Finley is an artist living and working in New York City. His work crosses over performance, sculpture and drawing and comes out of one fundamental presupposition: Our bodies are the only way we have of understanding ourselves, and everything that is not ourselves: it is through our body that we perceive and produce, it is what everything comes out of and where everything goes into. His work is concerned with interdependency: The relationships between all kinds of bodies (human, object, architecture, sound, etc.) and the way that things become themselves in relation to other things.

Leon Finley studied art at Cooper Union and received his MFA in Sculpture from Yale University in 2012. In 2012 he was the recipient of the Blair Dickinson Memorial Prize and the Dan David Prize Scholarship. He was the 2012-13 Fountainhead Teaching Fellow in the Sculpture and Extended Media Department at Virginia Commonwealth University and currently teaches sculpture at Cooper Union. His collaborative performance work has been presented at various venues around New York City including Movement Research, Center for Performance Research and most recently, the Whitney Museum of American Art as a part of Kevin Beasley’s Public Programing in Sonic Masses.

Juliana Huxtable is a writer, artist, and DJ based in New York City. She is a member of House of Ladosha, a queer artist collective based in Brooklyn, and creator and resident DJ of SHOCK VALUE. She creates and speaks from the positions of cyborg, priestess, witch, and trans girl simultaneously.

 

She is originally from Bryan–College Station, Texas, and graduated from Bard College. Her writing has appeared and been referenced in Artforum, Mousse, Maker magazine, and Garmento.

She has read and performed at envoy enterprises, New York, NY; Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY; Franklin Street Works, Stamford, CT; and Artists Space, New York, NY. Her work will be included in the 2015 New Museum Triennial.

iele paloumpis is a disabled, trans*/queer dance artist, teacher, and intuitive healer. As a life-long dancer, iele feels that engaging in a movement practice can be deeply restorative. Their healing work is rooted in kinesthetic awareness, Tarot, herbal medicine, and some astrological know-how, with a strong commitment to social justice.

Their choreographic work has been presented in New York through Movement Research, New York Live Arts, the Flea, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, and Dixon Place, in Pennsylvania at the Painted Bride Art Center, FLUXspace, Studio 34, The Community Education Center, Vox Populi, and the Philadelphia GLBT Arts Festival, in Maryland at the Lof/t, and in Connecticut at Franklin Street Works. iele has had the pleasure of dancing for niv Acosta, devynn emory, Jen McGinn, Emily Wexler and Nina Winthrop, among others. They have served on numerous panels and facilitated discussions centered on issues of identity, perception and performance. In 2010, iele was a co-recipient of The Leeway Foundation’s Art and Social Change Grant. They felt fortunate to be a 2012-13 Studio Series Resident Artist at New York Live Arts, as well as work under the mentorship of Trajal Harrell through the Queer Art Mentorship Program. In 2013, they were a Fall Space Grantee at Brooklyn Arts Exchange, and in 2014 they were in residence at Franklin Street Works with collaborators Joanna Groom and Jen McGinn. At the center of iele’s practice are ideas exploring body politics and artist self-empowerment. For more information visitwww.ielepaloumpis.com.

About SPECTRUM: SPECTRUM is Uconn-Stamford’s student-led LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans*, Queer/Questioning) and Ally group. SPECTRUM works to create and promote safe spaces and to engage the campus in conversations about gender and sexuality.

Getting To UConn Art Gallery: The campus is on Broad Street between Washington Boulevard and Franklin Street; officially “1 University Place, Stamford, CT 06901.”  The Gallery is located on the ground level of the building, just past the library. When using GPS to get to UConn’s parking garage, the best address to use is 1194 Washington Blvd, Stamford, CT.

During the regular academic year the Gallery is open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Friday until 5 pm, and Saturday from 9 a.m. to until noon. Hours are subject to change during semester breaks, recesses and the summer. Please call the Welcome Center with any questions at (203) 251-8400. Admission is free.