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January 14, 2015 at 6:30 pm

Pre-Screening Reception for the Documentary ART AND CRAFT with Avon Theatre

The documentary “ART AND CRAFT,” which is about prolific art forger Mark Landis and is on the Oscar Short List, will screen at Stamford’s Avon Theatre, January 14 at 7:30 pm. Before the screening Franklin Street Works will host a free public cocktail reception with the directors at our space from 6:30 until 7:20. After the 7:30 screening at the Avon, there will be a Post-film Q&A with filmmakers Jennifer Grausman & Sam Cullman. The Franklin Street Works pre-screening reception is free, and movie ticket prices at the avon are as follows: Avon Carte Blanche Members: FREE, (Franklin Street Works and Avon) Members: $6, Students & Seniors: $8, Nonmembers: $11.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.avontheatre.org, at the Avon business office (203-661-0321), the box office (203-967-3660, x2), or at the door. The Avon is located walking distance from Franklin Street Works at 272 Bedford Street, Stamford, CT.

Mark Landis has been called one of the most prolific art forgers in US history. His impressive body of work spans thirty years, covering a wide range of painting styles and periods that includes 15th Century Icons, Picasso, and even Walt Disney. And while the copies could fetch impressive sums on the open market, Landis isn’t in it for money. Posing as a philanthropic donor, a grieving executor of a family member’s will, and most recently as a Jesuit priest, Landis has given away hundreds of works over the years to a staggering list of institutions across the United States. But after duping Matthew Leininger, a tenacious registrar who ultimately discovers the decades-long ruse and sets out to expose his philanthropic escapades to the art world, Landis must confront his own legacy and a chorus of museum professionals clamoring for him to stop.

ART AND CRAFT starts out as a cat-and-mouse art caper, rooted in questions of authorship and authenticity—but what emerges is an intimate story of obsession and the universal need for community, appreciation, and purpose.

In English | Not Rated | 89 minutes

Sam Cullman • Director/ Producer/ Cinematographer – Sam Cullman is a cinematographer, producer and director of documentaries. He partnered with director Marshall Curry to co-direct, shoot and produce IF A TREE FALLS (2011) which won the U.S. Documentary Editing Award at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and later received an Academy Award® nomination for Best Documentary Feature. More recently, Cullman produced and shot the Peabody and Sundance Grand Jury prize-winning THE HOUSE I LIVE IN (2012), directed by Eugene Jarecki. His latest film, ART AND CRAFT (2014), which Cullman shot, produced and directed with Jennifer Grausman premiered at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival and was picked up by Oscilloscope Laboratories for theatrical distribution. In addition to his camerawork on his own films, Cullman’s cinematography has also appeared in dozens of other documentaries including WATCHERS OF THE SKY (2014), REAGAN (2011), and KING CORN (2006). A graduate of Brown University (1999) with Honors in Visual Art and a second major in Urban Studies, Cullman currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Jennifer Grausman • Director/ Producer – Jennifer Grausman recently completed directing and producing the feature documentary ART AND CRAFT, which premiered at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival and was picked up by Oscilloscope Laboratories for theatrical distribution. She also directed and produced the Emmy-nominated feature documentary, PRESSURE COOKER (2008). The film garnered awards from festivals across the country including a Special Jury Commendation at the 2008 Los Angeles Film Festival. Grausman also co-produced Eric Mendelsohn’s feature, 3 BACKYARDS (2009), which won Best Director at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. Previously, she produced six short films, including Suzi Yoonessi’s DEAR LEMON LIMA (2007), and Joan Stein’s SOLIDARITY (2005). In addition to making films, Grausman was Co-Director of The Screenwriters Colony in Nantucket, MA from 2010 to 2012. A graduate of the MFA film program at Columbia University, Grausman was honored with the 2005 Best Producer Award. Prior to graduate school, she was the Manager of Exhibition and Film Funding at The Museum of Modern Art.Z She earned her BFA in Art History at Duke University.

ABOUT THE AVON: The Avon Theatre is a member-supported, non-profit cultural hub, dedicated to presenting film in its highest form, and thriving because of the support of our patrons and community. In addition to an exciting slate of new releases, The Avon brings you one-of-a-kind special events and monthly programs. We are proud to provide a forum for in-person, community dialogue with directors, actors and other luminaries in a vibrant “Main Street America” setting. 

January 22, 2015 at 7:00 pm

Augustus Thompson Performs Ambient Electronic Music

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” exhibiting artist Augustus Thompson will perform ambient styled electronic music at the Franklin Street Works upstairs gallery. For his live performance, Thompson will sequence sound loops that include elements from his piece currently on view in the gallery’s café. The event is free and open to the public.

In Augustus Thompson’s work, field recordings bleed into guitar work, creating sculptural sound. Thompson’s performances involve the primitive sequencing of pre-recorded loops, referred to by the artist as “bedroom music.”  In these performances simple lyrics take on repetitive motifs, much like mantras, in ways that connect performer and audience. Often melancholic, Thompson’s music alludes to intimacy, privacy, and the open context of a free expansion of expression.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. The exhibition features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other media.

Exhibiting artists include: Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About the Artist: 

Augustus Thompson lives and works in Los Angeles and New York.  His work, which includes painting, print, installation, sound design and sculpture, has been exhibited most recently at the Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle, Belgium (2014); White Cube, London (2014); Fondazione Museo Pino Pascali, Polignano, Italy (2014); Night Gallery, Los Angeles (2014); Still House Group, New York (2014); Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles (2013) and in several San Francisco galleries where he began his career.

 

January 31, 2015 at 4:00 pm

Leslie Wayne Artist Talk

New York artist Leslie Wayne will speak about her work as part of “About Like So: The Influence of Painting” exhibition. The event includes a talk from 4:00 – 5:00, followed by  a casual Q & A and a social gathering in the café from 5:00 – 6:00pm.

Leslie Wayne will speak about her current body of work, entitled Paint/Rags, which are on view in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, “About Like So: The Influence of Painting.” At first glance, these three-dimensional paintings appear to be painted fabrics hanging on a hook. In reality, they have no cloth or canvas behind them and are made entirely of paint. The perceptual double-take Wayne creates gives rise to questions about context, about the value of art and everyday objects, and the nature of painting. Wayne will speak about her process, about the symbiotic relationship between process and ideas, and about her personal history that lead to this work.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is a group exhibition that explores how the histories, forms, materials and other qualities associated with painting inform conceptual art practices today. The exhibition, curated by Terri C Smith, aims, in part, to challenge expectations of painting, which are often attached to historic movements, decorative qualities or romantic notions of the artist in his or her studio. “About Like So” features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other art forms. This exhibition asks, “In an era where painting no longer has the art historical primacy it once did, what can it contribute to the dominant art practices of today – art that is often not medium specific and is rooted in the theory-driven practices of conceptual art?”

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. Exhibiting artists include: Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About Leslie Wayne: Leslie Wayne was born in Germany in 1953, and grew up in California. She currently lives and works in New York. Wayne studied painting at the University of California, Santa Barbara, from 1971 to 1973, and she received a BFA in sculpture at The Parsons School of Design. Wayne is the recent recipient of a Joan Mitchell Foundation Artists grant, and has received awards from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, the Buhl Foundation, The New York State Council on the Arts, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Her work is in the public collections of The Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC, Fondation Cartier pour d’art Contemporain, Paris, France, La Collection Jumex, Mexico City, Mexico, the Miami Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami, FL, the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York, and the Portland Museum of Art, Oregon, among others. Leslie Wayne is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

 

February 12, 2015 at 7:00 pm

Panel Discussion on the Medium of Painting in “About Like So”

Franklin Street Works presents a panel discussion explores painting’s role in contemporary art practices, especially as it relates to Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition “About Like So: The Influence of Painting.” Panelists are exhibiting artist Marley Freeman, art critic Noah Dillon, and the exhibition’s curator, Terri C Smith. The event is free and open to the public and takes place from 7:00 – 8:30 pm.

The panel will share observations about how painting’s histories, forms, and materiality relate to the works in the exhibition. In preliminary email discussions preparing for the event, the panelists have touched on topics such as how other forms of art production influence painting and vice versa, painting’s role as a tool in conceptual art and performance, and how some of the works in “About Like So” highlight the action of a painting’s creation and its development as image.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. It features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other media. This exhibition asks, “In an era where painting no longer has the art historical primacy it once did, what can it contribute to the dominant art practices of today – art that is often not medium specific and is rooted in the theory-driven practices of conceptual art?”

Exhibiting artists include Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About the Panelists: Noah Dillon is an artist and art critic who lives and works in New York. He has written for The Zephyr, the Brooklyn Rail, and artcritical. Dillon has also contributed to Art in America, Painting is Dead, and ArtSlant and is currently the associate editor at artcriticalMarley Freeman is a dedicated painter who has been showing in New York since 2011. She received an MFA in painting from Bard College, 2011, and a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2008. Her work was recently shown in House Arrest at Franklin Street Works, CT; Reading Boyishly at THIS IS THE PLACE, NY; Significant Ordinaries, The University Art Museum, California State University, CA.Of her work Freeman writes, “Painting is a manner of palimpsest, a battering of layers towards clarity- ‘object-ness.’ Brush as arbiter of form. My goals are in process. They devolve into a spirit of play and love of work.” Drawing on a history with textiles, Freeman’s work is a marginal type of abstraction born of a desire and pursuit of a new image. Her artist project website is www.ff-ff-ff-ff-ff.net. It has five works which change regularly. Terri C Smith has curated more than 100 contemporary art exhibitions for museums and other not-for-profit arts organizations. Her work has received numerous awards, including two multi-year grants from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.  Smith’s exhibitions have been met with positive reviews and features in international art publications such asArt Papers, Artforum online, Bombblog, Afterimage, and This isTomorrow.

February 21, 2015 at 4:00 pm

CLOSING WEEKEND: Artist Walk Through of “About Like So”

Franklin Street Works presents a (rescheduled) artist walk through of “About Like So: The Influence of Painting,” on the exhibition’s closing weekend. Exhibiting artists Sophy Naess, Paul Theriault, and Siebren Versteeg will walk us through the exhibition and discuss their work, touching on painting’s influence on their studio practices. The event is free and open to the public and takes place from 4:00 – 6:00 pm.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other media. In her work, Sophy Naess uses glycerine as a performative medium to connect with the history of abstract expressionism. In Naess’ case the materials employed are ephemeral, a distinct move away from oil paints stable properties. Included in “About Like So” are works composed of body friendly glycerine, scents, and pigments. Critic Samara Davis of Artforum online reflects, “Embedded in Naess’s soaps are tiny things: Pieces of weeds and flowers float next to funny trash items and found treasures. The contents are carefully arranged, whether suspended in color blocks or scattered just beneath the soap’s surface, and each tablet depicts a different landscape of secret meanings and spells.”

Through digital investigations, Paul Theriault paints direcly onto scanner beds and then scans the composition, allowing for the occasional burst of light to peek through the paint. For the piece “Tabula Rasa,” currently on display at Franklin Street Works, Theriault plays with traditional notions of painting by displaying his digital scan on an LED Monitor which rests on an easel, complete with dried oil stains around its edges. By juxtaposing this layering of digital effect with the easel’s reference to traditional painting Theriault expands on both the process of production and the form of presentation within the medium.

Siebren Versteeg’s “algorithm paintings” share formal traits with abstract painting, but are actually prints on canvas. Each work is composed by an algorithm the artist programmed using code. For the works in “About Like So,” Versteeg enters his algorithm paintings into the computer and prompts a Google image search to find a matching, “concrete” image, which is hung just to the right. In the end, Versteeg’s two computer processes turn the usual dynamic between the representational and the abstract inside out. In 2008, critic James Yood describes Versteegs interests, writing, “The Internet’s ceaseless flow of information, the parallel universes that it births and destroys, the cacophony of perpetual interactivity it encourages, all create torrents of new, largely unregulated visual data. Siebren Versteeg designs programs and display strategies to tap into these streams, siphoning off bits here and there, rearticulating their systems of presentation, and ultimately jamming their promise of stability and ubiquity.” (ArtForum Magazine)

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. Exhibiting artists: Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About the Artists: Sophy Naess is an artist based in New York. Her work has been shown in New York at Chapter, Essex Flowers, Lori Bookstein Gallery, Soloway, the Goethe Institut Library, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Recess, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Sue Scott Gallery, Printed Matter, and numerous project spaces. Naess received her MFA at Mason Gross School and her BFA from Cooper Union. Paul Theriault lives and works in New Haven Connecticut, close to his birthplace of Milford Connecticut in 1972. His practice lies primarily within the idiom of abstraction but produced through the medium of computers and digital technology. Theriault has been exploring the possibilities of new media within the context of artistic production for the past two decades. From 1992-2002, he lived in Chicago, Illinois, where he studied orchestral technique of the contra bass and worked primarily in digital video and sound based art. Theriault has exhibited work regularly in the United States as well as had his video work screened overseas. Siebren Versteeg holds a Masters of Fine Arts from University of Illinois at Chicago and a Bachelors of Fine Arts from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He was a participant of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and has exhibited most recently at Dorsch Gallery (Miami), The Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Offen Aug AEG (Nürnberg, Germany), Locust Projects (Miami), and Outpost (Ridgewood, NY). Solo exhibitions include: Rhona Hoffman (Chicago) and the Art Institute of Boston (Boston). His work is held in collections that include the Ulrich Museum of Art, the Marguilies Collection, the RISD Museum, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Hirshhorn Museum, the Yale Art Gallery, and the Guggenheim Museum.

March 7, 2015 at 5:00 pm

It’s gonna take a lotta love

ARCHIVE: INSTALLATION PHOTOGRAPHS // PRESS RELEASE // GALLERY PROGRAM

“It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition that explores ideas about inclusivity, authenticity, and commonality in an age of anxiety, isolated individualism, and virtually lived experience. The show is on view from March 7 – May 24, 2015, and is curated by Liza Statton and Terri C Smith.

The exhibiting artists avoid the detachment and slick seduction of the screen-based technologies that characterize our attention economy. Yet, rather than critiquing the sensationalist strategies embedded in the ever-expanding social media and advertising industries, they pursue modes of art-making that focus on the aesthetic and conceptual potential of society’s offcuts.

These artists also share a type of tragic-comic vision of contemporary culture. Humor, joy, and melancholy, among others, mix easily in their work. Yet, such emotional credibility creates a kind of slippage between empathy and alienation.

Wayne White, “See Do,” 2013, paint on offset lithograph, courtesy of Western Projects

Some artists create this slippage by making and re-making objects using seemingly inconsequential materials. Wayne White paints witty and sometimes biting phrases on found thrift store lithographs of scenes such as pastoral landscapes or rustic barns. Andy Coolquitt resituates familiar materials such as vinyl records, lightbulbs, synthetic shag fabric, and books-on-tape into installations that are inspired by functions and spaces outside of the gallery. His works articulate a tension between the familiarity of our real lives and the exclusive domain of the white cube gallery. Whiting Tennis creates drawings, paintings and sculptures that pit Modernist art’s fascination with pure form against an intentionally personal mode of a hobbiest aesthetic that wrestles with ideas of concealment and containment.

A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds, C.L.U.E. (color location ultimate experience), Part 1, 2007, Courtesy of Video Data Bank

Other artists such as Jon Campbell, Stephen Vitiello, and Jeremy Deller create subtle interventions using everyday language and music. Deller’s poster “Attention all DJs” takes on the form of a handwritten sign with tongue-in-cheek instructions for DJs. Jon Campbell’s “four letter word flags” brightly declare words like “Yeah,” “Home,” and “Want.” By inserting his word flags between country, state, or corporate flags in a city, Campbell prompts passerby’s to ask if the words we all use are worthy of a public format usually saved for pagentry or branding.  Stephen Vitiello’s sound works in “It’s gonna take a lotta love” appropriate commercial music from well known singers. With “Dolly Ascending” Vitiello slows down Dolly Parton singing “Stairway to Heaven” to the point where it sounds like choral music. In A.L. Steiner + Robbinschild’s “C.L.U.E. Part I” video two women perform dance infused movements in backdrops of natural and built environments, connecting color, action, attitude, and environment in a straightforward way that includes the audience in their choreographed antics.

Two of the exhibiting artists, Andy Coolquitt and Jon Campbell, have been commissioned to make new works for “It’s gonna take a lotta love.” In the gallery, Coolquitt, whose assemblages reconsider the materials we unconsciously engage with, will be creating a new mixed media installation entitled oo oo. Australian artist Jon Campbell has been commissioned to make new works for the exhibition. His gallery contributions include a “four letter word” mural and a set list painting, which is based on a Melbourne band’s 1984 performance. Campbell extends his painting practice into the public sphere with an ambitious installation in Downtown Stamford, his first in the United States. Campbell, who is interested in representing “the overlooked and undervalued,” will design and exhibit flags and banners with the words: Hold, Home, Look, Play, Want, and Yeah. The works will be mounted on existing flagpoles in public parks, at office buildings, and on construction fences throughout Downtown.

Yeah Flag, 2009, Sydney/Courtesy of the artist and Darren Knight, Sydne

Artists include: Jon Campbell (Melbourne), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), and Wayne White (LA).



This exhibition is sponsored in part by:

Jon Campbell’s participation has been assisted by:
March 19, 2015 at 3:00 pm

Ribbon Cutting for Jon Campbell Public Art Project

Australian Artist, Jon Campbell, creates his first public art project in the United States for Stamford, Connecticut, as part of the group exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love,” which is on view through May 24, 2015. The public is invited to a celebratory ribbon-cutting ceremony for the project’s flags and banners! The ribbon cutting will take place at Franklin Street Works on Thursday, March 19 at 3:00pm and will be followed by a reception in the Franklin Street Works cafe and galleries from 4:00-5:30pm. Campbell’s flags will be on view through June 16, which is also Flag Day.

More than 50 flags and banners will be mounted at Stamford’s public parks, schools and in front of select office buildings, including the Government Center. Jon Campbell’s “four-letter word flags” brightly declare the words Hold, Home, Look, Play, and Yeah. Their presence in the public sphere creates a visual dialogue with residents and visitors going about their daily routines.  Campbell’s works transform everyday words into pictorial objects, prompting viewers to understand the expansive nature of language and how context, scale, and color can change a word’s resonance. By inserting his word flags between country, state, or corporate flags in a city, Campbell prompts passersby to ask which words are worthy of a public format usually saved for pageantry or branding.

Franklin Street Works is also partnering with local public and private Stamford schools to develop educational programs that engage students, including a flag design competition for 7th-12th grade students. The competition will result in the printing and hanging of two winning flag designs in a public ceremony scheduled for late May.

“It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition that explores ideas about inclusivity, authenticity, and commonality in an age of anxiety, isolated individualism, and virtually lived experience. Artists include: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

About the Artist: Jon Campbell is a painter who lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. Marrying the design principles of modernist abstraction with Pop vernacular, Campbell creates text-based paintings, banners, and flags that aestheticize common experiences.  In 2013, was Campbell was commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) to create new public works for the comprehensive group exhibition, Melbourne Now. In 2012, Campbell was awarded the Basil Sellers Art Prize for his multi-panel painting Dream team. Recent solo exhibitions include Spring 1883, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2014); DUNNO, Kalimanrawlins, Melbourne (2012); Pure Bewdy, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2011); and Stacks On, Melbourne Art Foundation Commission (2010). Campbell is an Associate Professor at the VCA at Melbourne University.

About our Sponsors: This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by The Bacon Family, First County Bank, The Levenson-Bailey-Lupinacci Family, PlowShare Group, Purdue Pharma, SL Green Realty Corp., and Video Data Bank. Jon Campbell’s participation has been assisted by The University of Melbourne, Victorian College of the Arts, and the Australia Council for the Arts.


March 28, 2015 at 4:00 pm

Artist Talk by Jon Campbell, Exhibiting Artist in “It’s gonna take a lotta love”

On March 28, Franklin Street Works will host a lively talk by Australian artist, Jon Campbell, as part of the current exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love,” curated by Terri C. Smith and Liza Statton. For his Franklin Street Works talk, Campbell will discuss his art practice, including the formal strategies in the works he made for the Franklin Street Works’ exhibition. The talk will give insights into Campbell’s word paintings and flags, which are part of his public art installation in Stamford, CT. The event is free and open to the public and will take place at Franklin Street Works on Saturday, March 28th from 4:00-6:00pm, with the talk from 4:00 – 5:00pm followed by a Q & A and casual conversation with the artist in the café from 5:00-6:00pm.

Jon Campbell is a painter who lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. Marrying the design principles of modernist abstraction with Pop vernacular, he creates text-based paintings, banners, and flags that aestheticize common experiences.  For his Franklin Street Works commission, Campbell has created an ambitious public art project, his first in the United States, in addition to his gallery contributions, a “four letter word” mural, and a set list painting based on a Melbourne band’s 1984 performance.  Campbell’s flags and banners, including one at Stamford’s Government Center, will be mounted in public parks, schools and in front of downtown businesses, creating a visual dialogue with residents, visitors and passersby. These “four-letter word flags” brightly declare words like Hold, Home, Look, Play, and Yeah. Elevating everyday words into pictorial objects, Campbell’s flags ask viewers to consider which words are worthy of a public format usually saved for pageantry or branding and ask us to explore the potential of each word’s meaning.

Campbell adds, “Words are in everybody’s life but not necessarily as painted word. Once the word or phrase is isolated as a painting it suddenly resonates in a different way. So I think there is a lot of power in the word as an artwork. It also allows for a sense of humor and allows a lot of freedom in terms of design.”

“It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition that explores ideas about inclusivity, authenticity, and commonality in an age of anxiety, isolated individualism, and virtually lived experience.

Artists include: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

About the Artist: Jon Campbell lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. In 2013, Campbell was commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) to create new public works for the comprehensive group exhibition, Melbourne Now. In 2012, Campbell was awarded the Basil Sellers Art Prize for his multi-panel painting Dream team. Recent solo exhibitions include Spring 1883, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2014); DUNNO, Kalimanrawlins, Melbourne (2012); Pure Bewdy, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2011); and Stacks On, Melbourne Art Foundation Commission (2010). Campbell is an Associate Professor at the VCA at Melbourne University.

About our Sponsors: This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by The Bacon Family, First County Bank, The Levenson-Bailey-Lupinacci Family, PlowShare Group, Purdue Pharma, SL Green Realty Corp., and Video Data Bank. Jon Campbell’s participation has been assisted by The University of Melbourne, Victorian College of the Arts, and the Australia Council for the Arts.


 

May 17, 2015 at 4:00 pm

Show and Tell: Fandom

Franklin Street Works is excited to present a collaborative storytelling event called “Show and Tell: Fandom” that is being organized with local storytelling organization, Ignite Stamford. The event is free and open to the public and takes place at Franklin Street Works Sunday, May 17th from 4-6pm. You do not have to participate to attend. Everyone is welcome! To sign up, email info@franklinstreetworks.org or drop by Franklin Street Works.

The theme of this event will be fandom, inspired by the video “Our Hobby is Depeche Mode,” a Jeremy Deller (with Nick Abrahams) film currently on view in the group exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love.” The feature-length video documents fans of Depeche Mode from all over the world.

To sign up, email info@franklinstreetworks.org or drop by Franklin Street Works. Deadline for signing up is 5:00pm on May 15th. Anyone can sign up for the event to tell a 2-3 minute story about a moment in their life when they were a big fan and showed it. Participants are also encouraged to “show” their fandom by bringing an item representative of their obsession, whether it’s a binder full of baseball cards or an autographed concert ticket stub.

“It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition that explores ideas about inclusivity, authenticity, and commonality in an age of anxiety, isolated individualism, and virtually lived experience. It is on view through May 24 and includes Australian artist Jon Campbell’s outdoor public art project “Four Letter Words For Stamford,” which features affirmative words on flags and banners around town. The artists in this group show are: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

Jeremy Deller is a Tate Prize winning conceptual artist based in London. Frequently working in collaboration with other artists, individuals, and collectives, Deller employs documentary video, installation, and staged situations to explore British culture—its contradictory nature in a post-industrial, capitalist society—and the role art plays in forming collective interactions and activist positions. “Our Hobby is Depeche Mode” maps the obsession that fans from all over the world have with the band, and the underlying political (and at times religious) symbolism that the band evokes in the lives of its followers.

May 20, 2015 at 12:30 pm

“Only the Lonely” A Performance by Ryann Slauson

Ryann Slauson will perform “Only the Lonely” Wednesday, May 20th from 12:30 – 3:30 pm. The performance is programming for the current exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love,” curated by Terri C. Smith and Liza Statton. The performance will take place downstairs at Franklin Street Works during regular business hours, creating a unique lunchtime experience for cafe and gallery goers. This performance is free and open to the public.

“Only the Lonely,” a karaoke endurance piece, imagines Slauson as Neil Young singing a classic song by one of his most admired musicians, Roy Orbison. The piece engages with the effects of repetition and its transformative power over objects and experiences, as well as performed identities, attempts at perfection, and appropriations of collective culture. Each iteration of the karaoke performance will be recorded through the use of a VCR, lending an archaic and fuzzy aesthetic to the byproducts of the performance.

The use of music in and the lo fi quality of “Only the Lonely” aligned so closely with the exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love” curator Terri C Smith invited Slauson to perform it after the show was already on view. “It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition where the artists avoid the detachment and slick seduction of the screen-based technologies that characterize our attention economy. These artists also share a type of tragic-comic vision of contemporary culture. Humor, joy, and melancholy, among others, mix easily in their work. Such emotional credibility creates a slippage between empathy and alienation. Exhibiting Artists: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

Ryann Slauson received her BFA in Sculpture and Extended Media from the University of South Florida in 2010, and is currently completing her MFA in Studio Art and MA in Modern and Contemporary Art, Theory, and Criticism at Purchase College. She received the PUNCH Choice Award at the “2014 International Juried Exhibition” at PUNCH Gallery, Seattle, WA; and was included in ”Marking Time” at Adam Baumgold Gallery, NYC; “Seeing the Sky,” the 2014 Wassaic Summer Exhibition, Wassaic, NY; and “The Wanderers” at Trestle Projects, Brooklyn, NY.

May 30, 2015 at 7:30 pm

Listening Room: Music in Contemporary Space

Franklin Street Works is partnering with Stamford’s Treetops Chamber Music Society on the new concert series “Listening Room: Music in Contemporary Space.” The concert will capitalize on the contemporary art and music expertise of these two accomplished not-for-profit organizations in order to bring fresh, world-class chamber music to Franklin Street Works.

The concert takes place Saturday, May 30th from 7:30-9:00pm at Franklin Street Works and will feature the critically acclaimed Lark Quartet with Yousif Sheronick on percussion. Seats in the intimate upstairs gallery are $25 each, and $10 tickets are available for the downstairs live-feed lounge. Purchase tickets HERE

All ticket holders are welcome at the post-performance discussion with TCMS artistic director Oskar Espina Ruiz and are invited to attend the reception in Franklin Street Works’ café.

The Lark Quartet is an accomplished string quartet that has performed at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and the Brooklyn Museum’s Sackler Center for Feminist Art. They have recorded more than one-dozen CDs and the Washington Post described their performance as one “of grace, proportion, and burnished brilliance.” The string quartet will be performing new works tailored to art and music audiences who enjoy innovation and experimentation.  The program will include John Adams’ “John’s Book of Alleged Dances,” William Bolcom’s “Three Rags; Nico Muhly’s Big Time,” “Viaggio in Italia.”

About Lark Quartet: The Lark Quartet is known for its energy, passionate commitment and artistry since its inception in 1985. The Lark has performed in many of the world’s great cultural centers including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Library of Congress, London’s Wigmore Hall, L’Opéra de la Bastille in Paris, and appeared at international festivals including Lockenhaus, the Schleswig-Holstein Festival, Mostly Mozart, Istanbul Festival, Wolftrap and the Beethoven Festival in Moscow. The Lark has a distinguished tradition of working closely with the country’s most celebrated composers and commissioning new works, many of which have become mainstays of the chamber music repertoire. With a discography comprising more than a dozen CDs, the Lark has recorded for the Decca/Argo, Arabesque, Bridge, ERI, Endeavor, Koch, Point and New World labels. Lark Quartet: Composing America, comprising works by Adams, Bolcom, Moravec and Copland, was released on Bridge Records in 2014 to international acclaim.

About Treetops Chamber Music Society: Treetops Chamber Music Society (TCMS) is the premier chamber music organization in South Eastern Connecticut. Its main concert series takes place at the former art studio of American abstract artist Louis Schanker. Since its founding in 2006, TCMS has presented a stellar roster of international artists, among them the American, Cassatt, Daedalus, Escher and Shanghai Quartets, the New York Woodwind Quintet, and artists from the MET Orchestra. Since 2008, TCMS has also helped nurture some of the most talented young chamber musicians in the country through its J.C. Arriaga Chamber Music Competition and has commissioned new chamber music works by celebrated and up-and-coming composers. TCMS showcases contemporary art, with rotating exhibitions held at each concert.

 

June 13, 2015 at 5:00 pm

Acting on Dreams: The State of Immigrant Rights, Conditions, and Advocacy in the United States

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“Acting on Dreams: The state of immigrant rights, conditions, and advocacy in the U.S.” is an original group exhibition curated by Yaelle S. Amir for Franklin Street Works. It will be on view from June 13 – August 30, 2015. Opening reception is Saturday, June 13 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. With a VIP members preview from 5:00 – 6:00 pm.

Acting on Dreams explores the work of artists who use creative, often process-oriented, strategies and community collaborations to advocate for authorized and undocumented immigrants and propose innovative alternatives to immigration reform. Exhibiting artists are: Andrea Bowers, CultureStrike & JustSeeds, Chitra Ganesh and Mariam Ghani, Ghana ThinkTank, Marisa Morán Jahn (Studio REV-) in collaboration with National Domestic Workers Alliance and Caring Across Generations, Jenny Polak, QUEEROCRACY in collaboration with Carlos Motta, and Favianna Rodriguez. Immigrants now comprise approximately 13 percent of the total U.S. population (41.3 million), of which over a fourth are undocumented (11.4 million) and close to a fifth live in poverty. Despite numerous roadblocks, many in the United States have called for an overhaul of the immigration system, seeing it as a necessary and crucial step in the development of a more humane and just American society. Yet many others still fail to acknowledge immigrant hardships or to empathize with their conditions, prompting individuals, such as community activists and artists like those in Acting on Dreams, to attempt to fill the enormous gaps in immigration services and knowledge. With a recent surge in border crossings on the one hand, and stalled legislation in Congress and increased deportations on the other—the work of community and grassroots groups to raise awareness and ease immigrant living conditions has become more essential. The works included in this exhibition chronicle several efforts of immigrants and their advocates, while drawing connections between various communities and concerns within this highly complex issue. The artists apply their creative skills to further compassionate and respectful policies, and strive to communicate the immigrant experience in the United States—the frequent sense of isolation and uncertainty, but also courageousness, pride, and anticipation. The projects presented in Acting On Dreams include installation, sculpture, and video. Together, these artists present informed perspectives on U.S. immigration today via strategies such as research, storytelling and activism. In her video Sanctuary, Andrea Bowers tells the story of Elvira Arellano, an undocumented immigrant who entered into sanctuary on August 15, 2006, at the Adalberto United Methodist Church in Chicago in order to avoid the prospect of deportation and separation from her 8-year old son, a U.S. citizen. Arellano was ultimately deported a year into her stay at the church, and continues to organize from Mexico. The work attaches a face to the ruthless federal deportation policies that often go overlooked and reinforced in the discussions of policy reform. The Index of the Disappeared is an evolving multidisciplinary, physical archive and platform for public dialogue that embodies a haunting chapter in U.S. history. Artists Chitra Ganesh and Mariam Ghani have worked to compile an archive around post-9/11 disappearances to highlight the uncertainty many immigrants have experienced as a result of the geopolitical and policy shifts in the U.S. since 2001. Through official documents, secondary literature, and personal narratives, Index traces the ways in which censorship and data blackouts have enabled unprecedented disappearances, deportations, renditions, and detentions in the lives of immigrant, “other,” and dissenting communities in the U.S. A portion of the archive is included in the exhibition with a purpose of confronting audiences with the human costs of public policies, connecting domestic and foreign policies and policing, and challenging viewers to reevaluate the abstractions of political rhetoric in individual terms. In ThinkTank at the Border, Ghana ThinkTank has developed a multi-year project in an effort to investigate the seemingly un-crossable divide between “opposing” sides of immigration-related issues, collecting problems from citizen border-patrols like the Minutemen, and bringing them to recently deported or undocumented immigrants to solve. They collect these problems through focus groups, street interviews, and postcards, and present the immigrants’ solutions back to the Minuteman-like groups, working to find ways to have them implemented. The exhibition presents an iteration of the project, Border Cart – a mobile cart designed to fold into the back of a Tijuana Taxi, and then unfold at the border to provide shade, a seat, and a public think tank process to people crossing the U.S. – Mexico Border. Their border project is an outgrowth of a longer term project initiated in 2006 to “Develop the First World” by sending problems from the so-called “first” world to think tanks in Cuba, Ghana, Iran, Mexico, El Salvador, and the U.S. prison system to be solved. In an ongoing body of work entitled “CareForce,” artist Marisa Morán Jahn (Studio REV-) in collaboration with the National Domestic Workers Alliance and Caring Across Generations uses an artistic framework to develop tools that assist domestic workers in learning their rights and advocating for their socio-economic justice. Bridging public art, law, tech, and design, their projects have taken on various forms. From a mobile design lab and sound studio, to dance and movement, to an informative app accessible by any kind of phone—they offer crucial support to those who take care of our children, family, and homes. Jenny Polak has worked with residents and immigrant activists in Illinois and Indiana to advance recent struggles in blocking the construction of for-profit immigrant detention centers in their midst. Polak maintains an ongoing relationship with key figures in these communities—collaboratively developing imagery to create custom domestic objects that raise awareness to the effects of detention centers on jailed immigrants and on their surrounding communities. The photographs, drawings, and figurines that comprise (n)IMBY also assist the campaigners in documenting their achievements so that others can refer to them as a model. On Columbus Day in 2011, Queerocracy in collaboration with the artist Carlos Motta organized the distribution and collective public reading of excerpts from A Timeline of Queer Immigration – an exhaustive list of significant events in the global queer and immigrant movements. The intervention took place at Columbus Circle, the site commemorating the individual who marked the official start of immigration to Northern America. The timeline begins with Columbus’ arrival in 1492 and continues with dozens of seminal events that highlight the parallel struggles of immigrants and queer individuals to be recognized as equal citizens. Artist Favianna Rodriguez co-founded CultureStrike, a grassroots arts organization that engages cultural producers in migrant rights. Her work stems from the belief that art is necessary in promoting awareness of the disastrous effects of U.S. immigration policies, and in countering the often-negative perception of immigrants. As part of these efforts, Rodriguez initiated the campaign Migration is Beautiful featuring the now-iconic monarch butterfly symbol. The exhibition includes a coloring station by Rodriguez that provides advocates with on-site tools to construct their own butterfly wings in a public display of support for immigrant rights, as well as Migration Now!, a comprehensive print portfolio by CultureStrike and JustSeeds.

 

This exhibition was sponsored, in part, by Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development Office of the Arts.

 

July 11, 2015 at 5:00 pm

Panel Discussion for Acting On Dreams

Franklin Street Works is proud to present a panel discussion in conjunction with the current exhibition, “Acting on Dreams: The State of Immigrant Rights, Conditions, and Advocacy in the United States,” The exhibition, which is curated by Yaelle S. Amir, is on view through August 30.  This free, public panel takes place at Franklin Street Works on Saturday, July 11th at 5:00pm.

In line with the work included in the exhibition, the panel discussion will present creative responses to immigrant rights and conditions in the United States. Panel discussion speakers include curator Yaelle S. Amir; exhibiting artists Camilo Godoy, Marisa Jahn, and Jenny Polak; and Coordinating Committee Member of Connecticut Students for a Dream, Danilo Machado. Facilitated by the exhibition’s curator, three of the artists – Camilo Godoy, Marisa Morán Jahn, and Jenny Polak – will discuss the motivations, process, and aims of their projects, and Danilo Machado will present his work with the organization Connecticut Students for a Dream. Using these projects as a platform, the discussion will also focus more generally on creative tactics in advocacy work, the nature of community collaboration, the complex nature of activist initiatives, and more.

This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by Fairfield County’s Community Foundation and the Mertz Gilmore Foundation.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

Yaelle Amir (b. Haifa, Israel) is an independent curator and researcher. She currently holds the position of Curator at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, OR. Amir’s writing and curatorial projects focus primarily on artists whose practices supplement the initiatives of existing social movements—rendering themes within those struggles in ways that both interrogate and promote these issues to a wider audience. She has curated exhibitions at Artists Space, CUE Art Foundation, Center for Book Arts, ISE Cultural Foundation, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, Marginal Utility, and the Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University, among others.

Camilo Godoy was born in Bogotá, Colombia and currently lives in New York. He received a BFA from Parsons The New School for Design in 2012 and a BA from Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts in 2013. From 2012-2013 he was the Public Engagement Coordinator at Immigrant Movement International, a long-term project initiated by artist Tania Bruguera in Queens, New York. He has been involved with migrant rights groups since 2010 and has focused his advocacy in opposing detention and deportation practices. Godoy was a 2012-2013 Queer Art Mentorship fellow; a 2014 EMERGENYC fellow at The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at NYU; a 2014-2015 Keyholder Resident at the Lower East Side Printshop; and is currently a 2015 Movement Research Artist-in-Residence. Godoy’s work has been presented at venues such as La Mama Galleria, New York; Queens Museum, New York; Donaufestival, Krems; and Mousonturm, Frankfurt, among others.

Marisa Jahn (b. ) is an artist, multimedia designer, educator, and the founder of Studio REV-, a nonprofit studio whose public art projects combine creativity, bold ideas, and sound research to impact the lives of low-wage workers, immigrants, women, and youth. A graduate of UC Berkeley and MIT, Jahn has recieved numerous awards and distinctions including a CEC Artslink Fellow; a 2007-9 artist in residence at MIT’s Media Lab; and a 2013 MIT Open Doc Fellow. Jahn and Studio REV- have received several grants including The Rockefeller Foundation Cultural Innovation Fund, apexart’s Franchise Art award, Open Society Foundation, and Tribeca New Media Fund grant for interactive media. She is also an Advisor of NuLawLab, a design+law initiative of Northeastern University’s School of Law. Through collaborations with communities and organizational hosts, Jahn’s work function doubly as art and tool through public participation in the creation of new narratives and myths.  

Danilo Machado (b. Medellín, Colombia) is currently an undergraduate at the University of Connecticut-Stamford, studying English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and serves as a member of the Coordinating Committee of Connecticut Students for a Dream, a statewide network of undocumented youth and allies. He is passionate about intersectional organizing and political education, particularly around queer and undocumented identities. He has conducted numerous trainings and workshops, as well as written reports and Op-Eds on the intersections of these very personal identities, including publications in The Advocate and The Hartford Courant. Besides social justice work, Danilo is passionate about poetry, design, and having one more cup of coffee.

Jenny Polak (b. ) is an artist whose work simulates ways for people to survive hostile authorities. Polak’s family history of hiding and migration fuels her preoccupation with negotiations in the dangerous spaces of transition. She records and invents citizen/non-citizen collaborations and accommodations, often using the languages of architecture and design to reposition emergencies as part of the everyday. Coming from a background in both art and architecture, Polak’s projects are often site/community responsive; these include site-specific projects at the Griffiths International Sculpture Garden, Rome, NY; Exit Art, NYC; The Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn; and Soap Factory, Minneapolis, MN. Her work has been discussed in books and publications including The New York Times, The Newark Star-Ledger, The Guardian (UK), Brooklyn Rail, and Bad at Sports.

September 12, 2015 at 6:00 pm

Initial Conditions: Artists Make Spaces

ARCHIVE: GALLERY HANDOUT // PRESS RELEASE // INSTALLATION PHOTOGRAPHS

“Initial Conditions: Artists Make Spaces” is a group exhibition that features alternative spaces initiated by some of Franklin Street Works’ past exhibiting artists. As a not-for-profit whose mission and vision is largely informed by the alternative art space model, Franklin Street Works is celebrating the beginning of its fifth year by revisiting the “alternative” through artist projects that make new spaces. Works on view represent the activities of eight collectives or involved artists: Canaries, Ceramics Club (cc), Culture Push, La Casita Verde, Park McArthur and Constantina Zavitsanos, microRevolt, Regina Rex, and USELESS magazine. The show is on view from September 12, 2015 – January 3, 2016. Opening reception is Saturday, September 12 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm with a VIP members’ preview from 5:00 – 6:00. Exhibiting artist Sarah Dahnke will perform “The Dance for Solidarity” during the reception.

Often times the initial condition of these spaces are not art centric, but instead are born from pragmatic, social or utopic impulses such as finding language for shared experiences, supporting an individual’s physical needs, sharing resources, and creating new models for production or distribution. The creation of space here does not necessarily mean a fixed space either. Like Franklin Street Works, the alternative art space model often involves a dedicated building that serves as a foil to the dominant museum and commercial gallery offerings. Many of the groups in “Initial Conditions,” however, do not have a fixed location or are using locations that, to quote exhibiting artist Park McArthur, “are already textured with other concomitant activities like people’s homes and ceramic studios.” The alternative spaces in “Initial Conditions” also include: a gallery space that is democratically run by eleven artists; globally located artists united through their use of a digital knitting program; and nomadically occurring programs and exhibitions that address autoimmune and chronic conditions.

The installations on view are created by artists and collectives for “Initial Conditions” and include: machine-made knitted wall works; ceramic-based objects by artists who usually work in a different medium and are exploring their inner amateur; choreographed dances for prisoners in solitary confinement; a magazine on culture and politics; community-produced handmade signs from a community garden in Williamsburg, Brooklyn; an artist-run gallery whose projects serve, in part, as an extension of the group’s artistic practice; takeaway zines and newsletters; works around maintaining a sustainable, healthy body that resists being in service to capitalism; a library of books written by black female authors; a wearable sculpture that reflects how insects respond to emergencies; and texts and videos that examine and critique the model of monetary exchange and the power dynamics surrounding care.

Exhibiting artists include Olaronke Akinmowo, aricoco, Trisha Baga, Clifford Borress, Jessica Sue Burstein, Lea Cetera, Jesse Cohen, Sarah Dahnke,Lucky DeBellevue, Corey Escoto, Taraneh Fazeli, Marley Freeman, Rochelle Goldberg, Dave Hardy, Zoey Hart, EJ Hauser, Nancy Haynes, Rebecca Watson Horn, Christine Kelly, Kathryn Kerr, Carolyn Lazard, Pam Lins, Sara Magenheimer, Cat Mazza, Park McArthur, Keegan Monaghan, Nick Parker,Krista Peters, Lucy Raven, Sam Richardson, Halsey Rodman, Elisabeth Sherman, Bonnie Swencionis, Katya Tepper, Conrad Ventur, Victoria Vreeland,Adam Welch, Constantina Zavitsanos, and Marina Zurkow.

This exhibition is sponsored in part by Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, the Mertz-Gilmore Foundation, and the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development Office of the Arts.

 

 

November 14, 2015 at 5:00 pm

Four-on-the-floor: The Art of Five. A Party to Benefit Franklin Street Works. November 14, 5:00 – 8:00pm

“Four-on-the-floor: The Art of Five” is a benefit party celebrating Franklin Street Works’ fifth year as an award-winning, not-for-profit, contemporary art space. This event takes place at Rich Concourse at UConn Stamford on Saturday, November 14th from 5:00 – 8:00 pm and features a silent auction of art works and and unique art experiences, a celebration of internationally renowned artist Alison Knowles, drink, food, music, and more! This event is ticketed, with tiered prices ranging from $50.00 – $1,000. Tickets for the event are available at franklinstreetworksFIVE.eventbrite.com.

At “Four-on-the-floor,” Franklin Street Works will celebrate the career of Alison Knowles, founding member of the influential and historic 1960s Fluxus art movement. Longtime friends of the artist, Bibbe Hansen, Sean Carrillo, and Clarinda Mac Low will celebrate the honoree with short performances inspired by Knowles’ work.

The party will also include music from Guest DJ Taliesin Gilkes-Bower; a silent auction of art-related items, including works by major artists Tim Davis, Mark Dion, and Leslie Wayne; experiential items such as a special tour of Jack Shainman Gallery: The School (Kinderhook, NY) and a Hamptons art weekend; a catered dinner by the bite; an open bar of imported wines and craft beers; and a special multimedia display designed by Purchase College New Media students. Across the street from UConn, Stamford, Franklin Street Works’ galleries will be open for inquisitive guests who want to pop over and see the current exhibition “Initial Conditions: Artists Make Spaces.”

“Four-on-the-floor” will benefit Franklin Street Works’ innovative, museum-quality contemporary art exhibitions and educational programs which are free to the public. Since 2011, Franklin Street Works has curated 21 original shows, worked with more than 250 internationally exhibiting artists, and has organized 100 free public programs. Aiming to broaden community participation in the arts, Franklin Street Works offers programs that contribute to a larger arts dialogue and supports emerging and under-recognized artists. Franklin Street Works values artists’ labor and pays its exhibiting artists, presenters, performers, and writers. As Stamford’s professionally curated, contemporary art space, Franklin Street Works’ exhibitions have garnered accolades, including a two year grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Arts and positive reviews in major art publications such as Artforum, Hyperallergic, and Art Papers.

The event is sponsored by: Seaboard Properties, Reckson, a Division of SL Green, and Moffly Media. In-Kind sponsors are: Half Full Brewery, High Ridge Printing, Little Pub, Nestlé Waters, and Stamford Wine and Liquor.

ABOUT THE HONOREE:

Engaging with chance, randomness, repetition, humor, shared experiences, and the poetry of food, Alison Knowles’ pioneering career as a downtown New York artist spans more than fifty years. She was a founding member of Fluxus, a group focused on dismantling the conventions of high art through event type of instructional performances called “Happenings.” Knowles has earned recognition for her work throughout her lifetime, including a Guggenheim Fellowship (1968); two National Endowment for the Arts grants (1981, 1985); an honorary degree from Pratt Institute (2015); invitations to perform at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Tate Modern in London; and a special performance at President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama’s event An Evening of Poetry at the White House (2011).

GETTING THERE: Rich Concourse at UConn Stamford campus, located at 1 University Place, is less than one hour from New York City via Metro North and approximately one mile (a 15 minute walk) from the Stamford train station. Parking is available at UConn Stamford lot located on Washington Boulevard, directly across the street from the campus building on the second level of the garage. On street parking is available on Franklin Street (metered until 6 pm), and paid parking is available nearby in a lot on Franklin Street and in the Summer Street Garage (100