posted by Owner on October 24, 2016 at 4:30 pm

Artist Talk by Xaviera Simmons at UConn-Stamford

Artist Xaviera Simmons will discuss her work Monday, October 24 from 4:30 – 6:00 pm in room 108 at UConn-Stamford (just down the block from Franklin Street Works at the corner of Franklin St. and Broad St.).  Xaviera Simmons is currently in Franklin Street Works exhibition “Danger Came Smiling: Feminist Art and Popular Music.” This event is sponsored by UConn-Stamford’s Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies program and Franklin Street Works.

Xaviera Simmons completed a BFA in Photography from Bard College after spending two years of walking pilgrimage retracing the Atlantic Slave Trade. She participated in the studio program of the Whitney ISP while also completing a 2 year actor training conservatory with The Maggie Flanigan Studio. Xaviera has exhibited nationally and internationally where major exhibitions and performances include The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, Nouveau Museum National de Monaco, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, The Public Art Fund, The Kitchen, and The Sculpture Center. Simmons is a recipient of numerous awards including The David Driskell Prize, The Jerome Foundation Travel Fellowship, an Art Matters Fellowship, and a SmARTPower Fellowship. Simmons was a 2012 AIR at The Studio Museum in Harlem.

 

 

posted by Owner on October 15, 2016 at 4:00 pm

An Evening with Ann Magnuson

Writer, actress, musician and performance artist, Ann Magnuson, will visit Franklin Street Works for a casual conversation about her boundary-pushing, three-decade career.

As part of Franklin Street Works’ programming for their current exhibition Danger Came Smiling: Feminist Art and Popular Music, curated by Maria Elena Buszek, we will host genre-bending, counter-culture legend Ann Magnuson for a casual conversation about her work.

Ann Magnuson is a writer/actress/singer/musician/performer whose eclectic resume traverses the entertainment landscape like few others. She has acted in Hollywood blockbusters, Off-Broadway plays, TV sitcoms and indie films, fronted various bands, written for numerous publications and has presented her original performance art pieces at several major museums.

The event is free to the public and takes place at Franklin Street Works on Saturday, October 15 from 4:00 – 6:30 pm. Magnuson will talk with Franklin Street Works Creative Director, Terri C. Smith, and those in attendance from 4:15 – 5:15 followed by social time where beer, wine, coffee and snacks will be available for sale at the Franklin Street Works Café. Those attending will enjoy post-talk tunes spun by WPKN DJ Douglas Hovey, who will design a special set inspired by Magnuson and her work. WPKN 89.5 listener supported community radio is the media sponsor for this event.

Ann Magnuson, who is based in Los Angeles, is an exhibiting artist in Franklin Street Works’ current group show “Danger Came Smiling,” which brings together work by contemporary artists who use popular music as a medium, subject, and reference point for feminist messages. As part of the show, Magnuson is exhibiting two of her videos from the 1980s, Made for TV (1984) and Vandemonium, which Cinemax aired as part of its alternative programming in 1987. This is a rare east coast appearance for Magnuson, who also will perform songs from her new album “Dream Girl” as part of “Dream Sequencing: An Evening with Ann Magnuson” at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City on Monday October 17, at 7:00 pm.

Prior to her visit Magnuson will call in on WPKN to discuss her new album and other music projects with WPKN DJ Valerie Richardson, Tuesday October 4, at 6:00 pm. Along with Terri C Smith, they will discuss the “Danger Came Smiling” exhibition and explore Ann Magnuson’s past music projects, which have included: the sardonic folk trio Bleaker Street Incident; her heavy metal band, Vulcan Death Grip; and the psycho-psychedelic band, Bongwater with whom she released five albums and gained an international cult following that remains rabid today. In addition to her September 2016 release of Dream Girl, Magnuson has released two previous solo albums, The Luv Show (Geffen 1995) and Pretty Songs & Ugly Stories (Asphodel 2007).

Special thanks to event media sponsor WPKN!

posted by Owner on July 9, 2016 at 4:00 pm

Sunita Prasad Artist Talk

Franklin Street Works exhibiting artist Sunita Prasad will discuss past works that use parafictional, narrative, and research-based strategies to illuminate and challenge discourse on gender online, in public space, and in popular culture.  This free, public talk with Q & A is Saturday, July 9 from 4:00 – 5:30 pm at Franklin Street Works.

Prasad, an award-winning artist based in New York City, will discuss her overall body of work, paying special attention to the concepts and processes around her videos that explore gendered experiences in contemporary Indian culture. The talk will contextualize her video “Recitations not from memory,” which is included in Franklin Street Works’ current group exhibition “All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art,” on view through July 10. 

“Recitations not from memory” features women’s stories about gendered experiences that were anonymously shared with Sunita Prasad. As part of the conceptual construct for the piece, the artist sought out women who she considered to be her “socio-economic counterparts,” finding them through social media. These stories were then read from a teleprompter by men who Prasad also enlisted via social media. The artist notes that she was interested in this topic as discussions around it become more common in India, “Recitations not from memory is the result of an experiment in listening to, reading, and speaking gendered experience in the Indian context, during a period of increased attention to gender discrimination within Indian public discourse. 

This event is generously sponsored by Shelly Nichani.

ABOUT SUNITA PRASAD

Sunita Prasad is a New York City based artist and filmmaker. Her projects employ techniques of hybridization between documentary, fiction, and performance to address issues of gender, public space, and the history of social movements. Her work has been exhibited internationally at venues and institutions including the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Homesession in Barcelona, Torino Performance Art in Turin, Momenta Art in New York City, and Vox Populi Gallery in Philadelphia. She has received awards from the Art Matters Foundation, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, and the Warner Bros. Production Fund. She has also participated in residencies at TAJ & SKE Projects in Bangalore, the Contemporary Artists Center in Troy NY, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

posted by Owner on June 11, 2016 at 4:00 pm

All Byte: Exhibition Walkthrough and Beer Tasting

Join Franklin Street Works Creative Director, Terri C Smith, for a 30-minute walkthrough of our current, original exhibition, “All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art” followed by a beer tasting of our cafe beers (plus a surprise “guest” beer!) with Scott Gargan, culture writer and beer enthusiast.

MORE ON THE EXHIBITION
Franklin Street Works, University of Connecticut-Stamford’s Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, and Sacred Heart University’s Masters of Film and Television Program have collaborated to co-curate “All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art,” an exhibition of video works informed by intersectional feminist approaches. The exhibition is on view through July 10, 2016. Feminist conversations and scholarship around the inseparability of class, race, country of origin and other factors when contemplating gender are reflected in artworks that, among other things, encourage viewers to listen across difference and explore matrixes of power. “All Byte” features works made between 2013 and 2015 by nine artists or collectives: Michelle Marie Charles, INVASORIX, Kegels for Hegel, Sarah Lasley, Nicole Maloof, Virginia Lee Montgomery, Sunita Prasad, Legacy Russell, and Maryam Tafakory. This original exhibition is co-curated by the Program Director of Sacred Heart University’s Film and Television Masters school, Justin Liberman; Director of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Connecticut-Stamford, Ingrid Semaan; and Franklin Street Works’ Creative Director, Terri C Smith.


MORE ON SCOTT GARGAN
Scott Gargan is a multimedia reporter and public relations professional with more than a decade of experience writing and editing for domestic and international news publications; specializing in features writing and public relations. He wrote numerous stories on regional breweries during his four years at the Stamford Advocate and continues to seek out and sample small batch and other critically lauded brews in New England, New York, and beyond.

posted by Owner on June 8, 2016 at 12:30 pm

Luncheon with artist collaborative Kegels for Hegel

Texas-based artist collaborative Kegels for Hegel; Nutritionist Nicole Rose M.S., R.D.; and Naturopathic Doctor and Nurse Midwife Cindy Anderson will participate in a luncheon where attendees explore art, gender, philosophy, nutrition, and food.  To reserve one of the 14 spots for the event, interested parties should RSVP info@franklinstreetworks.org.

The event is exhibition programming for Franklin Street Works current show “All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art,” which includes seven videos by Kegels for Hegel. Guests will enjoy casual presentations and a lunch by Chef Erin Emmett that focuses on nutrient rich foods from 12:30 – 1:30 pm with open discussion from 1:30 – 2:00 pm.  There is an $18.00 admission, which includes lunch and a beverage. To reserve one of the 14 spots for the event, interested parties should RSVP info@franklinstreetworks.org.

Kegels for Hegel is a Texas-based collaborative project where the artists make music videos that, in part, queer the work of (mostly white, straight, male) philosophers and theorists. The collaborative elaborates on their approach to making these videos, “Unlike our academic training, which consisted of specialized study over decades, Kegels for Hegel is based in the emancipatory potential of a lack of expertise. We make songs using simple computer programs, cellphone apps and loops of noise that we find or create.” This embrace of the amateur combines with a scholarly understanding of the philosophers they riff on to create videos that are comfortable with being simultaneously silly, sexual and wickedly intelligent.

For this event Kegels for Hegel will discuss how their practice parallels the processes of choosing, eating and digesting food, but in the realm of ideas, which are imbibed and transformed via cognitive digestion and elimination. “Rather than penetrating, we pull in philosophical texts and let parts of them become parts of us,” write the artists,  “The encounter between the two changes both. Through the brain and the pelvic floor, we build up the necessary muscles to be able to hold onto something. Like the Kegel, we explore small enactments that can beget great changes.”

The artists’ philosophy informs the luncheon’s themes and inspired the café’s chef and “All Byte” co-curator, Terri C Smith, to also invite Nutritionist Nicole Rose M.S., R.D. and Naturopathic Doctor and Nurse Midwife Cindy Anderson to make brief presentations on the nutritional assets of the foods served and to explore some terminology around gender and health.

ABOUT CYNTHIA ANDERSON Dr. Cynthia Anderson known by her patients as Dr. Cindy is a licensed Naturopathic Physician who brings more than 25 years experience and skills working as a Nurse and Midwife to her practice. She has worked with adolescents in a school clinic setting and as a psychiatric nurse. Dr. Cindy specializes in natural ways to decrease anxiety and depression, fertility concerns, a healthy transition during menopause, healthy weight management, identifying and treating gluten sensitivity and helping women prevent and recover from breast cancer. She is certified in Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome and works with subclinical hypothyroidism. She enjoys teaching Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University of Bridgeport Naturopathic College. Recently she presented at the National Midwifery Convention on Natural options for menopause.

ABOUT NICOLE ROSE Nicole Rose M.S., R.D. is a registered dietitian nutritionist with a Masters Degree in Science/Clinical Nutrition from NYU in partnership with Mt. Sinai Hospital. Immediately following her graduate studies, Nicole’s focus was strictly clinical in nature during her time practicing at Montefiore Medical Center. It was only after several years of Nicole’s more conventional experience that her focus became more rooted in a holistic approach to wellness. Nicole’s most passionate belief, is that the foundation for health is based upon prevention of disease. It is her ultimate view that this can only be accomplished by eating Earth’s most wondrous gifts in conjunction with a productive lifestyle.

(MORE) ABOUT KEGELS FOR HEGEL Straddling philosophical smutcore and tongue in chic, Kegels for Hegel (K4H) is a conceptual art project that makes queerly ambivalent songs, music videos, and art objects that both revere and mess with the intellectual production of philosophers. K4H is a “band” fronted by two academics who have no musical training and use computer programs to make songs. But really K4H is an open collaboration of artists, academics, and other creative, clever, disreputable types who make things.

posted by Owner on March 26, 2016 at 6:30 pm

Screening “The F Word” Documentary on “4th Wave” feminist artists

Franklin Street Works presents Robert Adanto’s documentary film “The F Word” at the Stamford Innovation Center. The movie explores radical “4th wave” feminist performance through interviews with a new generation of feminist artists who use their bodies as subject matter. This public event is at 7:00pm on Saturday, March 26, at the Stamford Innovation Center and includes a post screening Q & A featuring: director, Robert Adanto; scholar and curator Dr. Kathy Battista; and two of the film’s featured artists Leah Schrager and Katie Cercone of Go! Push Pops. There will be a public cocktail reception at Franklin Street Works prior to the screening from 5:30 – 6:30 where people can view the current, feminist themed, exhibition “Cut-Up: Contemporary Collage and Cut-Up Histories through a Feminist Lens” and meet the director in a casual setting. The two downtown venues are a 10-minute-walk or short drive from each other. The event is free with a suggested donation of $5.

Film Trailer can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66oyUryy1DY

Because the female body continues to be politicized and policed, and because these artists delve into the fecund territory of female sexuality, self-objectification, and the female form as a site of resistance, many remain marginalized by the mainstream art world. Brooklyn-based Leah Schrager, well known for her performance practice, Naked Therapy, states, “As soon as you introduce a bit of sexiness or sexuality into an artwork it suddenly becomes questionable. Just because something elicits arousal or shows elements of sexiness does absolutely not make it not art.”

While some 4th wave artists, like Ann Hirsch and Kate Durbin, choose to analyze representations of female identity through digital media, others, like the radical, queer, transnational feminist art collective, Go! Push Pops, explore sexuality and gender in pop culture in the digital age. As feminist lecturer Kristen Sollee explains, 4th wavers, unlike their predecessors, “are not afraid to be ‘girly’, (or) to be hyper-feminine, or to wear a mini-skirt, to self-objectify” in the service of challenging patriarchal oppression or sexist ideals.


Dr. Kathy Battista, Director of Contemporary Art at Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York and author of Re-negotiating the Body: Feminist Artists in 1970s London (IB Tauris, 2012), is an on-screen expert, as are noted art critic and curator, Nancy Princenthal, and feminist lecturer, Kristen Sollee.

Featured Artists are: Narcissister, Ann Hirsch, Go! Push Pops, Leah Schrager, Kate Durbin, Rebecca Goyette, Rachel Mason, Rafia Santana, Damali Abrams, Faith Holland, Claudia Bitran, Michelle Charles, and Sadaf.

ABOUT ROBERT ADANTO

Robert Adanto, a classically trained actor, earned his M.F.A. in Acting from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and currently heads the Film & TV Production program at NSU’s University School. His films have been Official Selections at more than fifty international film festivals and have enjoyed screenings at The Smithsonian Institution’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; The Museum of Fine Arts Boston; Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); The National Center for Contemporary Art in Moscow; The Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto; The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles; The Worcester Art Museum, MA; The Tel Aviv Museum of Art and others. He made his directorial debut with The Rising Tide (2008), a feature-length documentary exploring the explosive Chinese contemporary art scene. Pearls on the Ocean Floor (2010), his second feature, examines the lives and works of Iranian female artists living and working in and outside the Islamic Republic. Featuring interviews with art luminaries Shirin Neshat and Shadi Ghadirian, Pearls on the Ocean Floor received the Bronze Palm Award for Best Documentary at the 2011 edition of the Mexican International Film Festival and the Spirit of Independents Award at the 2012 Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival. Adanto’s 2014, City of Memory explores Hurricane Katrina’s impact on the lives of visual artists from New Orleans. His newest film, “The F Word,” focuses on “4th wave” feminist artists who, among other tactics, use their bodies as subject matter in their work. Among other screenings, The F Word was recently presented as part of the Guerrilla Girls Twin City Takeover at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and at Dallas Contemporary, in association with Black Sheep Feminism: The Art of Sexual Politics, an exhibition curated by Alison Gingeras.

posted by Owner on March 5, 2016 at 2:04 pm

Art+Feminism Edit-A-Thon followed by exhibition tour and cocktails

There will be an Art+Feminism Edit-A-Thon at Darien Library: Sat, March 5th, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., followed by a tour of the Feminist-themed Exhibition, “Cut-Up: Contemporary Collage and Cut-Up Histories through a Feminist Lens,” and Reception from 4:30 – 7:00 pm at Franklin Street Works. You can REGISTER HERE for this free, public event:

Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity is not. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. This represents an alarming absence in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge.

Join us for a half-day, edit-a-thon to contribute and expand upon Wikipedia articles relating to art and feminism. After the edit-a-thon, we will celebrate at Franklin Street Works contemporary art space and cafe with a 20-minute tour of the original exhibition “Cut-Up: Contemporary Collage and Cut-Up Histories through a Feminist Lens,” followed by a wine and cheese reception. Edit-a-thon will be from 1 to 4 p.m. and exhibition tour and reception will be from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Join the revolution!

Reference materials will be provided, but attendees are encouraged to familiarize themselves with a topic beforehand. We encourage participants to look at the exhibiting artists in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition for entry/edit inspiration, they are listed in the exhibition description here:http://www.franklinstreetworks.org/cut-up-contemporary-collage-and-cut-up-histories-through-a-feminist-lens/. This event is co-sponsored by the Darien Library and Franklin Street Works.

posted by Owner on July 11, 2015 at 5:00 pm

Panel Discussion for Acting On Dreams

Franklin Street Works is proud to present a panel discussion in conjunction with the current exhibition, “Acting on Dreams: The State of Immigrant Rights, Conditions, and Advocacy in the United States,” The exhibition, which is curated by Yaelle S. Amir, is on view through August 30.  This free, public panel takes place at Franklin Street Works on Saturday, July 11th at 5:00pm.

In line with the work included in the exhibition, the panel discussion will present creative responses to immigrant rights and conditions in the United States. Panel discussion speakers include curator Yaelle S. Amir; exhibiting artists Camilo Godoy, Marisa Jahn, and Jenny Polak; and Coordinating Committee Member of Connecticut Students for a Dream, Danilo Machado. Facilitated by the exhibition’s curator, three of the artists – Camilo Godoy, Marisa Morán Jahn, and Jenny Polak – will discuss the motivations, process, and aims of their projects, and Danilo Machado will present his work with the organization Connecticut Students for a Dream. Using these projects as a platform, the discussion will also focus more generally on creative tactics in advocacy work, the nature of community collaboration, the complex nature of activist initiatives, and more.

This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by Fairfield County’s Community Foundation and the Mertz Gilmore Foundation.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

Yaelle Amir (b. Haifa, Israel) is an independent curator and researcher. She currently holds the position of Curator at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, OR. Amir’s writing and curatorial projects focus primarily on artists whose practices supplement the initiatives of existing social movements—rendering themes within those struggles in ways that both interrogate and promote these issues to a wider audience. She has curated exhibitions at Artists Space, CUE Art Foundation, Center for Book Arts, ISE Cultural Foundation, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, Marginal Utility, and the Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University, among others.

Camilo Godoy was born in Bogotá, Colombia and currently lives in New York. He received a BFA from Parsons The New School for Design in 2012 and a BA from Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts in 2013. From 2012-2013 he was the Public Engagement Coordinator at Immigrant Movement International, a long-term project initiated by artist Tania Bruguera in Queens, New York. He has been involved with migrant rights groups since 2010 and has focused his advocacy in opposing detention and deportation practices. Godoy was a 2012-2013 Queer Art Mentorship fellow; a 2014 EMERGENYC fellow at The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at NYU; a 2014-2015 Keyholder Resident at the Lower East Side Printshop; and is currently a 2015 Movement Research Artist-in-Residence. Godoy’s work has been presented at venues such as La Mama Galleria, New York; Queens Museum, New York; Donaufestival, Krems; and Mousonturm, Frankfurt, among others.

Marisa Jahn (b. ) is an artist, multimedia designer, educator, and the founder of Studio REV-, a nonprofit studio whose public art projects combine creativity, bold ideas, and sound research to impact the lives of low-wage workers, immigrants, women, and youth. A graduate of UC Berkeley and MIT, Jahn has recieved numerous awards and distinctions including a CEC Artslink Fellow; a 2007-9 artist in residence at MIT’s Media Lab; and a 2013 MIT Open Doc Fellow. Jahn and Studio REV- have received several grants including The Rockefeller Foundation Cultural Innovation Fund, apexart’s Franchise Art award, Open Society Foundation, and Tribeca New Media Fund grant for interactive media. She is also an Advisor of NuLawLab, a design+law initiative of Northeastern University’s School of Law. Through collaborations with communities and organizational hosts, Jahn’s work function doubly as art and tool through public participation in the creation of new narratives and myths.  

Danilo Machado (b. Medellín, Colombia) is currently an undergraduate at the University of Connecticut-Stamford, studying English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and serves as a member of the Coordinating Committee of Connecticut Students for a Dream, a statewide network of undocumented youth and allies. He is passionate about intersectional organizing and political education, particularly around queer and undocumented identities. He has conducted numerous trainings and workshops, as well as written reports and Op-Eds on the intersections of these very personal identities, including publications in The Advocate and The Hartford Courant. Besides social justice work, Danilo is passionate about poetry, design, and having one more cup of coffee.

Jenny Polak (b. ) is an artist whose work simulates ways for people to survive hostile authorities. Polak’s family history of hiding and migration fuels her preoccupation with negotiations in the dangerous spaces of transition. She records and invents citizen/non-citizen collaborations and accommodations, often using the languages of architecture and design to reposition emergencies as part of the everyday. Coming from a background in both art and architecture, Polak’s projects are often site/community responsive; these include site-specific projects at the Griffiths International Sculpture Garden, Rome, NY; Exit Art, NYC; The Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn; and Soap Factory, Minneapolis, MN. Her work has been discussed in books and publications including The New York Times, The Newark Star-Ledger, The Guardian (UK), Brooklyn Rail, and Bad at Sports.

posted by Owner on May 20, 2015 at 12:30 pm

“Only the Lonely” A Performance by Ryann Slauson

Ryann Slauson will perform “Only the Lonely” Wednesday, May 20th from 12:30 – 3:30 pm. The performance is programming for the current exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love,” curated by Terri C. Smith and Liza Statton. The performance will take place downstairs at Franklin Street Works during regular business hours, creating a unique lunchtime experience for cafe and gallery goers. This performance is free and open to the public.

“Only the Lonely,” a karaoke endurance piece, imagines Slauson as Neil Young singing a classic song by one of his most admired musicians, Roy Orbison. The piece engages with the effects of repetition and its transformative power over objects and experiences, as well as performed identities, attempts at perfection, and appropriations of collective culture. Each iteration of the karaoke performance will be recorded through the use of a VCR, lending an archaic and fuzzy aesthetic to the byproducts of the performance.

The use of music in and the lo fi quality of “Only the Lonely” aligned so closely with the exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love” curator Terri C Smith invited Slauson to perform it after the show was already on view. “It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition where the artists avoid the detachment and slick seduction of the screen-based technologies that characterize our attention economy. These artists also share a type of tragic-comic vision of contemporary culture. Humor, joy, and melancholy, among others, mix easily in their work. Such emotional credibility creates a slippage between empathy and alienation. Exhibiting Artists: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

Ryann Slauson received her BFA in Sculpture and Extended Media from the University of South Florida in 2010, and is currently completing her MFA in Studio Art and MA in Modern and Contemporary Art, Theory, and Criticism at Purchase College. She received the PUNCH Choice Award at the “2014 International Juried Exhibition” at PUNCH Gallery, Seattle, WA; and was included in ”Marking Time” at Adam Baumgold Gallery, NYC; “Seeing the Sky,” the 2014 Wassaic Summer Exhibition, Wassaic, NY; and “The Wanderers” at Trestle Projects, Brooklyn, NY.

posted by Owner on May 17, 2015 at 4:00 pm

Show and Tell: Fandom

Franklin Street Works is excited to present a collaborative storytelling event called “Show and Tell: Fandom” that is being organized with local storytelling organization, Ignite Stamford. The event is free and open to the public and takes place at Franklin Street Works Sunday, May 17th from 4-6pm. You do not have to participate to attend. Everyone is welcome! To sign up, email info@franklinstreetworks.org or drop by Franklin Street Works.

The theme of this event will be fandom, inspired by the video “Our Hobby is Depeche Mode,” a Jeremy Deller (with Nick Abrahams) film currently on view in the group exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love.” The feature-length video documents fans of Depeche Mode from all over the world.

To sign up, email info@franklinstreetworks.org or drop by Franklin Street Works. Deadline for signing up is 5:00pm on May 15th. Anyone can sign up for the event to tell a 2-3 minute story about a moment in their life when they were a big fan and showed it. Participants are also encouraged to “show” their fandom by bringing an item representative of their obsession, whether it’s a binder full of baseball cards or an autographed concert ticket stub.

“It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition that explores ideas about inclusivity, authenticity, and commonality in an age of anxiety, isolated individualism, and virtually lived experience. It is on view through May 24 and includes Australian artist Jon Campbell’s outdoor public art project “Four Letter Words For Stamford,” which features affirmative words on flags and banners around town. The artists in this group show are: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

Jeremy Deller is a Tate Prize winning conceptual artist based in London. Frequently working in collaboration with other artists, individuals, and collectives, Deller employs documentary video, installation, and staged situations to explore British culture—its contradictory nature in a post-industrial, capitalist society—and the role art plays in forming collective interactions and activist positions. “Our Hobby is Depeche Mode” maps the obsession that fans from all over the world have with the band, and the underlying political (and at times religious) symbolism that the band evokes in the lives of its followers.

posted by Owner on March 28, 2015 at 4:00 pm

Artist Talk by Jon Campbell, Exhibiting Artist in “It’s gonna take a lotta love”

On March 28, Franklin Street Works will host a lively talk by Australian artist, Jon Campbell, as part of the current exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love,” curated by Terri C. Smith and Liza Statton. For his Franklin Street Works talk, Campbell will discuss his art practice, including the formal strategies in the works he made for the Franklin Street Works’ exhibition. The talk will give insights into Campbell’s word paintings and flags, which are part of his public art installation in Stamford, CT. The event is free and open to the public and will take place at Franklin Street Works on Saturday, March 28th from 4:00-6:00pm, with the talk from 4:00 – 5:00pm followed by a Q & A and casual conversation with the artist in the café from 5:00-6:00pm.

Jon Campbell is a painter who lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. Marrying the design principles of modernist abstraction with Pop vernacular, he creates text-based paintings, banners, and flags that aestheticize common experiences.  For his Franklin Street Works commission, Campbell has created an ambitious public art project, his first in the United States, in addition to his gallery contributions, a “four letter word” mural, and a set list painting based on a Melbourne band’s 1984 performance.  Campbell’s flags and banners, including one at Stamford’s Government Center, will be mounted in public parks, schools and in front of downtown businesses, creating a visual dialogue with residents, visitors and passersby. These “four-letter word flags” brightly declare words like Hold, Home, Look, Play, and Yeah. Elevating everyday words into pictorial objects, Campbell’s flags ask viewers to consider which words are worthy of a public format usually saved for pageantry or branding and ask us to explore the potential of each word’s meaning.

Campbell adds, “Words are in everybody’s life but not necessarily as painted word. Once the word or phrase is isolated as a painting it suddenly resonates in a different way. So I think there is a lot of power in the word as an artwork. It also allows for a sense of humor and allows a lot of freedom in terms of design.”

“It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition that explores ideas about inclusivity, authenticity, and commonality in an age of anxiety, isolated individualism, and virtually lived experience.

Artists include: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

About the Artist: Jon Campbell lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. In 2013, Campbell was commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) to create new public works for the comprehensive group exhibition, Melbourne Now. In 2012, Campbell was awarded the Basil Sellers Art Prize for his multi-panel painting Dream team. Recent solo exhibitions include Spring 1883, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2014); DUNNO, Kalimanrawlins, Melbourne (2012); Pure Bewdy, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2011); and Stacks On, Melbourne Art Foundation Commission (2010). Campbell is an Associate Professor at the VCA at Melbourne University.

About our Sponsors: This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by The Bacon Family, First County Bank, The Levenson-Bailey-Lupinacci Family, PlowShare Group, Purdue Pharma, SL Green Realty Corp., and Video Data Bank. Jon Campbell’s participation has been assisted by The University of Melbourne, Victorian College of the Arts, and the Australia Council for the Arts.


 

posted by Owner on March 19, 2015 at 3:00 pm

Ribbon Cutting for Jon Campbell Public Art Project

Australian Artist, Jon Campbell, creates his first public art project in the United States for Stamford, Connecticut, as part of the group exhibition “It’s gonna take a lotta love,” which is on view through May 24, 2015. The public is invited to a celebratory ribbon-cutting ceremony for the project’s flags and banners! The ribbon cutting will take place at Franklin Street Works on Thursday, March 19 at 3:00pm and will be followed by a reception in the Franklin Street Works cafe and galleries from 4:00-5:30pm. Campbell’s flags will be on view through June 16, which is also Flag Day.

More than 50 flags and banners will be mounted at Stamford’s public parks, schools and in front of select office buildings, including the Government Center. Jon Campbell’s “four-letter word flags” brightly declare the words Hold, Home, Look, Play, and Yeah. Their presence in the public sphere creates a visual dialogue with residents and visitors going about their daily routines.  Campbell’s works transform everyday words into pictorial objects, prompting viewers to understand the expansive nature of language and how context, scale, and color can change a word’s resonance. By inserting his word flags between country, state, or corporate flags in a city, Campbell prompts passersby to ask which words are worthy of a public format usually saved for pageantry or branding.

Franklin Street Works is also partnering with local public and private Stamford schools to develop educational programs that engage students, including a flag design competition for 7th-12th grade students. The competition will result in the printing and hanging of two winning flag designs in a public ceremony scheduled for late May.

“It’s gonna take a lotta love” is a group exhibition that explores ideas about inclusivity, authenticity, and commonality in an age of anxiety, isolated individualism, and virtually lived experience. Artists include: Jon Campbell (Melbourne, Australia), Andy Coolquitt (Austin/NYC), Jeremy Deller (London), Jessica Mein (NYC), A.L. Steiner + Robbinschilds (NYC), Whiting Tennis (Seattle), Stephen Vitiello (Richmond, VA), and Wayne White (LA).

About the Artist: Jon Campbell is a painter who lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. Marrying the design principles of modernist abstraction with Pop vernacular, Campbell creates text-based paintings, banners, and flags that aestheticize common experiences.  In 2013, was Campbell was commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) to create new public works for the comprehensive group exhibition, Melbourne Now. In 2012, Campbell was awarded the Basil Sellers Art Prize for his multi-panel painting Dream team. Recent solo exhibitions include Spring 1883, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2014); DUNNO, Kalimanrawlins, Melbourne (2012); Pure Bewdy, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney (2011); and Stacks On, Melbourne Art Foundation Commission (2010). Campbell is an Associate Professor at the VCA at Melbourne University.

About our Sponsors: This exhibition is sponsored, in part, by The Bacon Family, First County Bank, The Levenson-Bailey-Lupinacci Family, PlowShare Group, Purdue Pharma, SL Green Realty Corp., and Video Data Bank. Jon Campbell’s participation has been assisted by The University of Melbourne, Victorian College of the Arts, and the Australia Council for the Arts.


posted by Owner on February 21, 2015 at 4:00 pm

CLOSING WEEKEND: Artist Walk Through of “About Like So”

Franklin Street Works presents a (rescheduled) artist walk through of “About Like So: The Influence of Painting,” on the exhibition’s closing weekend. Exhibiting artists Sophy Naess, Paul Theriault, and Siebren Versteeg will walk us through the exhibition and discuss their work, touching on painting’s influence on their studio practices. The event is free and open to the public and takes place from 4:00 – 6:00 pm.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other media. In her work, Sophy Naess uses glycerine as a performative medium to connect with the history of abstract expressionism. In Naess’ case the materials employed are ephemeral, a distinct move away from oil paints stable properties. Included in “About Like So” are works composed of body friendly glycerine, scents, and pigments. Critic Samara Davis of Artforum online reflects, “Embedded in Naess’s soaps are tiny things: Pieces of weeds and flowers float next to funny trash items and found treasures. The contents are carefully arranged, whether suspended in color blocks or scattered just beneath the soap’s surface, and each tablet depicts a different landscape of secret meanings and spells.”

Through digital investigations, Paul Theriault paints direcly onto scanner beds and then scans the composition, allowing for the occasional burst of light to peek through the paint. For the piece “Tabula Rasa,” currently on display at Franklin Street Works, Theriault plays with traditional notions of painting by displaying his digital scan on an LED Monitor which rests on an easel, complete with dried oil stains around its edges. By juxtaposing this layering of digital effect with the easel’s reference to traditional painting Theriault expands on both the process of production and the form of presentation within the medium.

Siebren Versteeg’s “algorithm paintings” share formal traits with abstract painting, but are actually prints on canvas. Each work is composed by an algorithm the artist programmed using code. For the works in “About Like So,” Versteeg enters his algorithm paintings into the computer and prompts a Google image search to find a matching, “concrete” image, which is hung just to the right. In the end, Versteeg’s two computer processes turn the usual dynamic between the representational and the abstract inside out. In 2008, critic James Yood describes Versteegs interests, writing, “The Internet’s ceaseless flow of information, the parallel universes that it births and destroys, the cacophony of perpetual interactivity it encourages, all create torrents of new, largely unregulated visual data. Siebren Versteeg designs programs and display strategies to tap into these streams, siphoning off bits here and there, rearticulating their systems of presentation, and ultimately jamming their promise of stability and ubiquity.” (ArtForum Magazine)

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. Exhibiting artists: Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About the Artists: Sophy Naess is an artist based in New York. Her work has been shown in New York at Chapter, Essex Flowers, Lori Bookstein Gallery, Soloway, the Goethe Institut Library, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Recess, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Sue Scott Gallery, Printed Matter, and numerous project spaces. Naess received her MFA at Mason Gross School and her BFA from Cooper Union. Paul Theriault lives and works in New Haven Connecticut, close to his birthplace of Milford Connecticut in 1972. His practice lies primarily within the idiom of abstraction but produced through the medium of computers and digital technology. Theriault has been exploring the possibilities of new media within the context of artistic production for the past two decades. From 1992-2002, he lived in Chicago, Illinois, where he studied orchestral technique of the contra bass and worked primarily in digital video and sound based art. Theriault has exhibited work regularly in the United States as well as had his video work screened overseas. Siebren Versteeg holds a Masters of Fine Arts from University of Illinois at Chicago and a Bachelors of Fine Arts from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He was a participant of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and has exhibited most recently at Dorsch Gallery (Miami), The Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Offen Aug AEG (Nürnberg, Germany), Locust Projects (Miami), and Outpost (Ridgewood, NY). Solo exhibitions include: Rhona Hoffman (Chicago) and the Art Institute of Boston (Boston). His work is held in collections that include the Ulrich Museum of Art, the Marguilies Collection, the RISD Museum, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Hirshhorn Museum, the Yale Art Gallery, and the Guggenheim Museum.

posted by Owner on February 12, 2015 at 7:00 pm

Panel Discussion on the Medium of Painting in “About Like So”

Franklin Street Works presents a panel discussion explores painting’s role in contemporary art practices, especially as it relates to Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition “About Like So: The Influence of Painting.” Panelists are exhibiting artist Marley Freeman, art critic Noah Dillon, and the exhibition’s curator, Terri C Smith. The event is free and open to the public and takes place from 7:00 – 8:30 pm.

The panel will share observations about how painting’s histories, forms, and materiality relate to the works in the exhibition. In preliminary email discussions preparing for the event, the panelists have touched on topics such as how other forms of art production influence painting and vice versa, painting’s role as a tool in conceptual art and performance, and how some of the works in “About Like So” highlight the action of a painting’s creation and its development as image.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. It features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other media. This exhibition asks, “In an era where painting no longer has the art historical primacy it once did, what can it contribute to the dominant art practices of today – art that is often not medium specific and is rooted in the theory-driven practices of conceptual art?”

Exhibiting artists include Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About the Panelists: Noah Dillon is an artist and art critic who lives and works in New York. He has written for The Zephyr, the Brooklyn Rail, and artcritical. Dillon has also contributed to Art in America, Painting is Dead, and ArtSlant and is currently the associate editor at artcriticalMarley Freeman is a dedicated painter who has been showing in New York since 2011. She received an MFA in painting from Bard College, 2011, and a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2008. Her work was recently shown in House Arrest at Franklin Street Works, CT; Reading Boyishly at THIS IS THE PLACE, NY; Significant Ordinaries, The University Art Museum, California State University, CA.Of her work Freeman writes, “Painting is a manner of palimpsest, a battering of layers towards clarity- ‘object-ness.’ Brush as arbiter of form. My goals are in process. They devolve into a spirit of play and love of work.” Drawing on a history with textiles, Freeman’s work is a marginal type of abstraction born of a desire and pursuit of a new image. Her artist project website is www.ff-ff-ff-ff-ff.net. It has five works which change regularly. Terri C Smith has curated more than 100 contemporary art exhibitions for museums and other not-for-profit arts organizations. Her work has received numerous awards, including two multi-year grants from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.  Smith’s exhibitions have been met with positive reviews and features in international art publications such asArt Papers, Artforum online, Bombblog, Afterimage, and This isTomorrow.

posted by Owner on January 31, 2015 at 4:00 pm

Leslie Wayne Artist Talk

New York artist Leslie Wayne will speak about her work as part of “About Like So: The Influence of Painting” exhibition. The event includes a talk from 4:00 – 5:00, followed by  a casual Q & A and a social gathering in the café from 5:00 – 6:00pm.

Leslie Wayne will speak about her current body of work, entitled Paint/Rags, which are on view in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, “About Like So: The Influence of Painting.” At first glance, these three-dimensional paintings appear to be painted fabrics hanging on a hook. In reality, they have no cloth or canvas behind them and are made entirely of paint. The perceptual double-take Wayne creates gives rise to questions about context, about the value of art and everyday objects, and the nature of painting. Wayne will speak about her process, about the symbiotic relationship between process and ideas, and about her personal history that lead to this work.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is a group exhibition that explores how the histories, forms, materials and other qualities associated with painting inform conceptual art practices today. The exhibition, curated by Terri C Smith, aims, in part, to challenge expectations of painting, which are often attached to historic movements, decorative qualities or romantic notions of the artist in his or her studio. “About Like So” features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other art forms. This exhibition asks, “In an era where painting no longer has the art historical primacy it once did, what can it contribute to the dominant art practices of today – art that is often not medium specific and is rooted in the theory-driven practices of conceptual art?”

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. Exhibiting artists include: Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About Leslie Wayne: Leslie Wayne was born in Germany in 1953, and grew up in California. She currently lives and works in New York. Wayne studied painting at the University of California, Santa Barbara, from 1971 to 1973, and she received a BFA in sculpture at The Parsons School of Design. Wayne is the recent recipient of a Joan Mitchell Foundation Artists grant, and has received awards from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, the Buhl Foundation, The New York State Council on the Arts, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Her work is in the public collections of The Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC, Fondation Cartier pour d’art Contemporain, Paris, France, La Collection Jumex, Mexico City, Mexico, the Miami Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami, FL, the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York, and the Portland Museum of Art, Oregon, among others. Leslie Wayne is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

 

posted by Owner on January 22, 2015 at 7:00 pm

Augustus Thompson Performs Ambient Electronic Music

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” exhibiting artist Augustus Thompson will perform ambient styled electronic music at the Franklin Street Works upstairs gallery. For his live performance, Thompson will sequence sound loops that include elements from his piece currently on view in the gallery’s café. The event is free and open to the public.

In Augustus Thompson’s work, field recordings bleed into guitar work, creating sculptural sound. Thompson’s performances involve the primitive sequencing of pre-recorded loops, referred to by the artist as “bedroom music.”  In these performances simple lyrics take on repetitive motifs, much like mantras, in ways that connect performer and audience. Often melancholic, Thompson’s music alludes to intimacy, privacy, and the open context of a free expansion of expression.

“About Like So: The Influence of Painting” is on view at Franklin Street Works through February 22, 2015. The exhibition features works that use paint in unorthodox ways or bypass the medium all together to reveal how the “language of painting” can invade, obstruct and enhance other media.

Exhibiting artists include: Polly Apfelbaum, Paul Branca, Taylor Davis, Tim Davis, Marley Freeman, Ragnheiour Gestsdottir, Michael Graeve, Dave Hardy, Alex Hubbard, John Knuth, Sophy Naess, Tameka Norris, Peter Nowogrodzki/Max Kotelchuck, Seth Price, Paul Theriault, Brad Tucker, Siebren Versteeg, Augustus Thompson, Leslie Wayne, “in actu: music and painting” (K.R.H. Sonderborg, Wolfgang Hannen, Günter Christmann and Paul Lovens).

About the Artist: 

Augustus Thompson lives and works in Los Angeles and New York.  His work, which includes painting, print, installation, sound design and sculpture, has been exhibited most recently at the Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle, Belgium (2014); White Cube, London (2014); Fondazione Museo Pino Pascali, Polignano, Italy (2014); Night Gallery, Los Angeles (2014); Still House Group, New York (2014); Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles (2013) and in several San Francisco galleries where he began his career.

 

posted by Owner on December 4, 2014 at 6:00 pm

SPECTRUM and Franklin Street Works Present: a panel on gender identity with artists Kerry Downey, Leon Finley, Juliana Huxtable, and iele paloumpis

For the Fall 2014 semester, UConn Stamford’s LGBTQ/ALLY Group SPECTRUM has been engaging the campus community in a series of diverse conversations about gender. To continue this dialogue, SPECTRUM, in collaboration with Franklin Street Works, will be presenting a panel discussion that includes four trans*/non-binary identitfied artists Kerry Downey, Leon Finley, Juliana Huxtable, and iele paloumpis on Thursday, December, 4th from 6:00-8:00pm at the UConn Stamford Campus Art Gallery. In addition to the panel, a daylong pop-up gallery of digital works by the participating artists will be on view at UConn Stamford Campus Art Gallery from 1-5pm for those interested in learning more. Two thirty-minute tours will be given at 2pm and 4pm by the organizers of the event before the panel discussion begins at 6:00pm. The installation and event are free and open to the public. The UConn, Stamford, art gallery located at 1 University Place. Stamford, CT 06901.

This conversation comes at a time when SPECTRUM and the LGBTQ community at UConn Stamford have worked to successfully allocate two gender-neutral bathrooms on campus, ensuring that trans* and gender nonconforming students, faculty, and staff feel safe and protected. Many don’t realize that bathrooms are highly gendered spaces, and, as such, places of gender policing. The panel conversation will encourage students think complexly about the ways in which artists use their work as a platform to explore and raise questions surrounding gender identity.

About the Artists:

Kerry Downey (born 1979, Florida) is an interdisciplinary artist and teacher based in New York City. Her work is driven by questions of queerness, support, collaboration and the relationship between private emotion and political consciousness. She holds a BA from Bard College and an MFA from Hunter College.  She has recently shown at Taylor Macklin (Zurich), Franklin Street Works (Stamford, CT), CCS at Bard College, Columbia University (NY), Invisible Dog (Brooklyn), A.I.R Gallery (Brooklyn), The Bronx River Arts Center, Spectacle Theater (Brooklyn), and NURTUREart (Brooklyn).

Downey’s work received a Critic’s Pick in Artforum, and has appeared The Brooklyn Rail, the New Yorker, and the New York Times. This past June, Downey curated Failing to Levitate at The EFA Project Space with Natasha Marie Llorens. She was a Queer/Art/Mentorship Fellow in 2012-13 and is a current participant in the Drawing Center’s Open Sessions. Downey teaches at the Museum of Modern Art and Hunter College Art Department in New York City.

Leon Finley is an artist living and working in New York City. His work crosses over performance, sculpture and drawing and comes out of one fundamental presupposition: Our bodies are the only way we have of understanding ourselves, and everything that is not ourselves: it is through our body that we perceive and produce, it is what everything comes out of and where everything goes into. His work is concerned with interdependency: The relationships between all kinds of bodies (human, object, architecture, sound, etc.) and the way that things become themselves in relation to other things.

Leon Finley studied art at Cooper Union and received his MFA in Sculpture from Yale University in 2012. In 2012 he was the recipient of the Blair Dickinson Memorial Prize and the Dan David Prize Scholarship. He was the 2012-13 Fountainhead Teaching Fellow in the Sculpture and Extended Media Department at Virginia Commonwealth University and currently teaches sculpture at Cooper Union. His collaborative performance work has been presented at various venues around New York City including Movement Research, Center for Performance Research and most recently, the Whitney Museum of American Art as a part of Kevin Beasley’s Public Programing in Sonic Masses.

Juliana Huxtable is a writer, artist, and DJ based in New York City. She is a member of House of Ladosha, a queer artist collective based in Brooklyn, and creator and resident DJ of SHOCK VALUE. She creates and speaks from the positions of cyborg, priestess, witch, and trans girl simultaneously.

 

She is originally from Bryan–College Station, Texas, and graduated from Bard College. Her writing has appeared and been referenced in Artforum, Mousse, Maker magazine, and Garmento.

She has read and performed at envoy enterprises, New York, NY; Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY; Franklin Street Works, Stamford, CT; and Artists Space, New York, NY. Her work will be included in the 2015 New Museum Triennial.

iele paloumpis is a disabled, trans*/queer dance artist, teacher, and intuitive healer. As a life-long dancer, iele feels that engaging in a movement practice can be deeply restorative. Their healing work is rooted in kinesthetic awareness, Tarot, herbal medicine, and some astrological know-how, with a strong commitment to social justice.

Their choreographic work has been presented in New York through Movement Research, New York Live Arts, the Flea, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, and Dixon Place, in Pennsylvania at the Painted Bride Art Center, FLUXspace, Studio 34, The Community Education Center, Vox Populi, and the Philadelphia GLBT Arts Festival, in Maryland at the Lof/t, and in Connecticut at Franklin Street Works. iele has had the pleasure of dancing for niv Acosta, devynn emory, Jen McGinn, Emily Wexler and Nina Winthrop, among others. They have served on numerous panels and facilitated discussions centered on issues of identity, perception and performance. In 2010, iele was a co-recipient of The Leeway Foundation’s Art and Social Change Grant. They felt fortunate to be a 2012-13 Studio Series Resident Artist at New York Live Arts, as well as work under the mentorship of Trajal Harrell through the Queer Art Mentorship Program. In 2013, they were a Fall Space Grantee at Brooklyn Arts Exchange, and in 2014 they were in residence at Franklin Street Works with collaborators Joanna Groom and Jen McGinn. At the center of iele’s practice are ideas exploring body politics and artist self-empowerment. For more information visitwww.ielepaloumpis.com.

About SPECTRUM: SPECTRUM is Uconn-Stamford’s student-led LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans*, Queer/Questioning) and Ally group. SPECTRUM works to create and promote safe spaces and to engage the campus in conversations about gender and sexuality.

Getting To UConn Art Gallery: The campus is on Broad Street between Washington Boulevard and Franklin Street; officially “1 University Place, Stamford, CT 06901.”  The Gallery is located on the ground level of the building, just past the library. When using GPS to get to UConn’s parking garage, the best address to use is 1194 Washington Blvd, Stamford, CT.

During the regular academic year the Gallery is open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, Friday until 5 pm, and Saturday from 9 a.m. to until noon. Hours are subject to change during semester breaks, recesses and the summer. Please call the Welcome Center with any questions at (203) 251-8400. Admission is free.

posted by Owner on November 8, 2014 at 4:00 pm

It Narratives: Curator Tour and Mailbox Inauguration, Closing Weekend

For the closing weekend of “It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information” Franklin Street Works will host a curator led tour of the show with Brian Droitcour and Zanna Gilbert as well as a festive inauguration of the space’s new mailbox, which was created by artist Lukas Geronimas. The event is free and open to the public and takes place at Franklin Street Works Saturday, November 8th from 4:00 – 7:00pm

Curator and critic Brian Droitcour and curator and researcher Zanna Gilbert will share their thinking behind the show It Narratives: How Objects Move as Information, which considers how the Internet and traditional post intersect in contemporary art. They will also discuss works on view  during a casual walkthrough of the galleries. After the tour, the curators, Franklin Street Works staff and the exhibiting artists on hand will inaugurate Franklin Street Works’ new mailbox. A work of art commissioned for this exhibition, “The Custom Postboxis a functioning, glowing mailbox made by Brooklyn sculptor Lukas Geronimas. Artist David Horvitz will also be on site to inform visitors about his “It Narratives” project “Mail Art Call @ Franklin Street Works,” which is an open mail art call that received 580 responses from across the globe.

The artists in It Narratives find forms for everyday experiences of distance and time by reflecting on the way objects move through information networks. It Narratives is on view through November 9th at Franklin Street Works. Artists include: Greg Allen, Tyler

Coburn, Tim Devin, Yevgeniy Fiks, Lukas Geronimas, Frank Heath, David Horvitz, Jean Keller, Alexandra Lerman, Kristin Lucas, Cat Mazza, Kristina Lee Podesva and Alan McConchie, Paul Soulellis, Emily Spivack, The Thread, Ehren Tool, Print All Over Me, Forms of Melancholy, Lance Wakeling, Roberto Winter.

Brian Droitcour is a writer, translator, curator, critic, and a PhD candidate in comparative literature at New York University. Previous exhibition projects include “BFFA3AE – DTR” at 47 Canal in New York and “Big Reality” at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn. He has contributed reviews and essays to Artforum, Art in America, and Rhizome, among other publications. He has been yelping since January 2012 and his account was awarded Elite status last year. His web site fifteenstars.com, a collection of found Yelp reviews with commissioned illustrations and an accompanying essay, was featured as part of the New Museum’s First Look series of online exhibitions in October 2013. Among other projects, Brian is currently editing Klaus_ebooks, a series of artists’ ebooks published by Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery.

Zanna Gilbert is a postdoctoral fellow at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York and she holds a PhD from the University of Essex and Tate Research in the UK. Her research focuses on artists’ networks and the transnational circulation of art through the mail. She curated the exhibitions “Felipe Ehrenberg: Works from the Tate Archive” (2009), “Intimate Bureaucracies: Art and the Mail” (2011), “Contested Games: Mexico 68’s Design Revolution” (2012), “Daniel Santiago: Brazil is my Abyss” (MAMAM, Recife, 2012; MAC-Niteroi, Rio, 2014) and “Edgardo Antonio Vigo: The Unmaker of Objects” (MoMA, 2014). She has taught postgraduate courses at the University of Essex, UK and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).

Lukas Geronimas was born in Toronto, Ontario. He received a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of British Columbia, and an MFA from the Milton Avery School at Bard College. His art is about manufacturing openings. It is also about value, in that an artwork should be created to live within the studio, the exhibition, and the collection; with each context comes a separate evaluation, and Lukas thinks an artwork is most meaningful when it is responsible for them all. Lukas currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

David Horvitz was born in California in 1982 and lives in Brooklyn, NY. Recent solo exhibitions include: concurrent shows at Jan Mot, Brussels, and Dawid Radziszewski Gallery, Warsaw; Peter Amby, Copenhagen; Statements, Art Basel; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; and Chert, Berlin. His work has been shown at EVA International 2014, Glasgow International 2014, LIAF 2013, MoMA, The Kitchen, and the New Museum. In New York, he has realized projects with Recess, Clocktower Gallery, post at MoMA, Printed Matter, Rhizome, and Triple Canopy.

posted by Owner on October 23, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Artist Talk by Frank Heath

Exhibiting artist Frank Heath will give a talk in conjuction with the current exhibition “It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information.” The event is free and open to the public and will take place at Franklin Street Works Thursday, October 23rd from 7:00 – 8:30pm.

This event will begin with a screening of a short video work by artist Frank Heath, titled “Asymptomatic Carrier” (2013). The video focuses on a defunct quarantine hospital on North Brother Island, the frequently overlooked next-door neighbor of Randall’s Island. “Asymptomatic Carrier” was featured earlier this year as part of the program “A Tale of Two Islands” by High Line Art, in New York, NY.

This video reflects some of the themes of Heath’s Bcc works, in which sculpture components are mailed to defunct locales on New York’s lesser-known islands. Sculptures and photographs from Heath’s Bcc series are on view as part of Franklin Street Works’ current group exhibition “It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information. Heath will be in conversation with one of the show’s curators, Zanna Gilbert, to discuss these works within the wider context of his practice.

 

posted by Owner on October 18, 2014 at 4:00 pm

“It Narratives” Curator, Zanna Gilbert, Talks About Mail Art and Exhibiting Artist, Lance Wakeling, Screens Video

On Saturday, October 18, there is a talk by independent curator Zanna Gilbert and a video screening by artist Lance Wakeling in conjuction with the current exhibition It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information. The event is free and open to the public. The talk will be presented from 4:00 – 5:00 pm, followed by a refreshment intermission, and the screening from 6:00 -7:00 pm. Audiences are welcome to join for all or part, depending on their schedules and interests.

Zanna Gilbert will be discussing the history of mail art in relation to the themes of the current exhibition It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information (co-curated by Gilbert & Brian Droitcour). It Narratives explores the intersection between modern digital communications media and the traditional postal system.

Video artist Lance Wakeling, whose video A Tour of the AC-1 Transatlantic Submarine Cable is currently on view as part of It Narratives, will present excerpts from his trilogy of essay videos about the physicality of the network. Since 2011, Wakeling has been producing a series of video essays that explores the physical and social landscapes of the Internet.

It Narratives is on view through November 9th at Franklin Street Works. Participating artists include: Greg Allen, Tyler Coburn, Tim Devin, Yevgeniy Fiks, Lukas Geronimas, Frank Heath, David Horvitz, Jean Keller, Alexandra Lerman, Kristin Lucas, Cat Mazza, Kristina Lee Podesva and Alan McConchie, Paul Soulellis, Emily Spivack, The Thread, Ehren Tool, Print All Over Me, Forms of Melancholy, Lance Wakeling, Roberto Winter.

About the Curator: Zanna Gilbert is a postdoctoral fellow at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York and she holds a PhD from the University of Essex and Tate Research in the UK. Her research focuses on artists’ networks and the transnational circulation of art through the mail. She curated the exhibitions Felipe Ehrenberg: Works from the Tate Archive (2009), Intimate Bureaucracies: Art and the Mail (2011), Contested Games: Mexico 68’s Design Revolution (2012), and Edgardo Antonio Vigo: The Unmaker of Objects (MoMA, 2014).

About the Artist: Lance Wakeling (1980) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. His recent films include “Views of a Former Verizon Building,” “Subida al cielo,” “A Tour of the AC-1 Transatlantic Submarine Cable,” and “Field Visits for Chelsea Manning,” which premiers late winter 2014. His artworks and videos have been shown at Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing; Supplement Gallery, London; NiMK, Amsterdam; The Woodmill, London; Import Projects, Berlin; Capricious Gallery, Brooklyn; and Future Gallery, Berlin.

 

posted by Owner on October 9, 2014 at 12:15 pm

MakerBot 3D Printing Demonstration

On Thursday, October 9 from 6:00 – 7:30 pm MakerBot will give a 3D printing demonstration and talk followed by a Q&A session. This demo will include a MakerBot company overview, a 3D printer demonstration, more on their retail stores, and information on how their printers work, with an overview of each printer. They will also share some customer use cases and great MakerBot stories. The event is free and open to the public.

The demonstration and talk are programming for the current Franklin Street Works exhibition It Narratives: The Movement of Objects as Information, which features, among other things, print on demand items, including several 3D prints. MakerBot is the official 3D printing sponsor of the show.

It Narratives explores the intersection between modern digital communications media and the traditional postal system. The artists in It Narratives find forms for everyday experiences of distance and time by reflecting on the way objects move through information networks. The exhibition is curated by New York-based guest curators Brian Droitcour and Zanna Gilbert. It is on view through November 9th at Franklin Street Works.

Exhibiting artists include: Greg Allen, Tyler Coburn, Tim Devin, Yevgeniy Fiks, Lukas Geronimas, Frank Heath, David Horvitz, Jean Keller, Alexandra Lerman, Kristin Lucas, Cat Mazza, Kristina Lee Podesva and Alan McConchie, Paul Soulellis, Emily Spivack, The Thread, Ehren Tool, Print All Over Me, Forms of Melancholy, Lance Wakeling, Roberto Winter.

About MakerBot:

MakerBot, a subsidiary of Stratasys Ltd., is leading the next industrial revolution by setting the standards in reliable and affordable desktop 3D printing. Founded in 2009, MakerBot sells desktop 3D printers to innovative and industry-leading customers worldwide, including engineers, architects, designers, educators and consumers. To learn more about MakerBot, visit www.makerbot.com.

posted by Owner on August 15, 2014 at 6:30 pm

Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis and Joanna Groom Second Performance of Original Work

Friday, August 15 at 6:30 pm Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis and Joanna Groom perform again in Franklin Street Works’ upstairs gallery.

The piece, not unordered and not resembling was created by McGinn and paloumpis, who are Brooklyn-based choreographers. Originally performed on Saturday, June 28, at Franklin Street Works, the 40-minute piece provides a landscape for movement, revealing individual and collective experiences. This free, public performance is part of Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, “Showing the Work” curated by Sarah Fritchey, and is sponsored, in part, by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The evening will end with a post-performance discussion with the artists.

McGinn and paloumpis’ movement practice includes choreography and improvisation as a way to explore experiences in the present moment. For their second performance of not unordered in not resembling, they are interested in investigating how the work and their dancing will change depending on audience, time, and the present experience. iele paloumpis explains, “through performance we learn a little bit more about what the work is doing each time we show it.” Jen McGinn and iele paloumpis are also fascinated by the prospect of deepinging their performance via audience feedback during the post-performance Q & A.

Using recorded and live sound, and a taped map created specifically for Franklin Street Works’ first floor gallery, the dance piece creates a nonlinear structure in which all ideas have the possibility of connecting to all other ideas. The taped floor pattern used by the performers is unique to the architecture of Franklin Street Works, making the choreography at this venue unlike any past or future performances. The site specificity of the work means it is the last chance to see this exact work live.

not unordered in not resembling will be performed for a second and final time by Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis and Joanna Groom in Franklin Street Works’ upstairs gallery on Friday, August 15th at 6:30 pm.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Jen McGinn received her B.A. and M.F.A in Dance from Hollins University in partnership with the ADF. Her work and teaching practices have been shaped through residencies at Dickinson College, Hollins University, Booker High School Visual and Performing Arts Center, ADF, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, West Coast Civic Ballet, Dance Theater Workshop, nEW Festival, and the University of Maryland, among others. She currently co-directs the Summer Institute in Dance at the University of the Arts in addition to being a visiting lecturer, is a Dance Specialist for ”Life Lines” Community Arts Project, is the Studio Manager at the Center for Performance Research and is a Movement Research AIR. Her interests include Cecchetti ballet, magical thinking, and logic problems. www.jenmcginndance.com

iele paloumpis is a trans*/queer dance artist, choreographer, and teacher navigating invisible disabilities and class disparities in NYC. At the center of their practice are ideas exploring body politics and artistic self-empowerment.


posted by Owner on July 17, 2014 at 6:30 pm

Curator Tour of “Showing the Work” with Sarah Fritchey

Franklin Street Works will host a curator tour of “Showing the Work” on Thursday, July 17 from 6:30 – 8:00 pm with Sarah Fritchey. The tour will give visitors a rare opportunity to explore the art in Franklin Street Works galleries with the show’s creator in a casual setting. Fritchey will discuss the impulse for the show, the exhibition’s themes, and the challenges and successes of performance in a gallery setting. Join us for this free, public event to learn more about experimental dance and choreography in contemporary art. This event is made possible, in part, through a two-year grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts.

Sarah Fritchey giving a member tour at the preview party for “Showing the Work”

Over the eight months preceding the exhibition, Fritchey met with the artists to discuss their practices and their various distances to the visual arts world. While many of the artists arrived with academic training in dance, music and writing, none had come from a studio practice or visual arts background. Fritchey will discuss the greatest challenge of this show — asking a choreographer or language maker to create something — to make an object or environment that would remain on display in an art space. These insights will explain the audio elements of the show, as well as the interactive components.  A group “hand dance” inspired by the influential dancer, Yvonne Rainer, will take place at end of the tour.

“Showing the Work” is an exhibition that explores experimental dance in the gallery setting and challenges our expectations of the gallery experience. The show brings together eight New York City based dancers whose work explores the meeting place between the artist, the performance and the audience and demonstrates how time-specific events might be meaningfully exhibited in the gallery over a multi-week period. Showing the work asks: How can live, transitory qualities of a dance be represented during the exhibition? How does the gallery facilitate a critical analysis of artist-audience interaction that a theatre does not?  Five of the artists performed one-night-only performances at Franklin Street Works during the first four weeks of the twelve-week run that activated their installations in the galleries.

Gillian Walsh performing at the opening reception for “Showing the Work”

Exhibiting artists include Jen McGinn and iele paloumpis, Robert Morris, Claudia La Rocco, Carolee Schneeman, Mårten Spångberg, Tatyana Tenenbaum, and Gillian Walsh.  Showing the Work is on view through August 31, 2014.

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

Sarah Fritchey is an active freelance curator who explores the tension between choreography and improvisation as it relates to site and the act of meeting. She is the Visual Arts Coordinator at Artspace New Haven and a contributing writer to ArtForum’s Critcs’ Picks, The New Haven Advocate, and Art New England. She contributed as a research assistant to the 2013 Venice Biennial, the 50th Anniversary show at the ICA Philadelphia, Liam Gillick: 199A-199B at The Hessel Museum of Art, and Dangerous Beauty at The Chelsea Museum of Art.

posted by Owner on July 12, 2014 at 4:00 pm

Kent “Wood” Evans Performance

Kent “Wood” Evans, who has performed internationally at venues such as the Acadamie Beaux Arts in Paris and the Nuvorican Poets Café in Greenwich Village, will be at Franklin Street Works for a free impromptu performance while he is visiting his hometown of Stamford, Connecticut. The event is this Saturday, July 12 from 4:00 – 6:00 pm. It will feature Evans sharing songs from his new album from 4:00 – 5:00 pm followed by a short Q &A and a reception with the writer and musicians in the Franklin Street Works café.

Video still from “Too Many Nights @Nuyorican” by Kent Evans

Evans performed at Franklin Street Works in 2012, reading from his critically acclaimed book “A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots.” For this event he will present a sneak peak of his video for “Too Many Nights @Nuyorican,” which is seven minutes in length and will debut at the Guanajuato International Film Festival July 31st. The author, musician and filmmaker will also perform several tracks from his new album with Dust Industry, which is his self-described “Mexican spoken word, stoner rock project” that features Evans on guitar/lyrics, Michael Severens on cello, and Drew Trudeau on bass.

More on Kent Evans:

Half Cantonese and half UK, Kent Evans was born in New York City in 1975 and grew up between New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

He graduated in psychology and dramatic literature from New York University, and began traveling extensively throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. He is currently based in Guanajuato, Mexico.

posted by Owner on June 28, 2014 at 7:00 pm

iele paloumpis and Jen McGinnis perform “not unordered and not resembling”

Saturday, June 28

7:00 pm: iele paloumpis, Jen McGinn and Joanna Groom perform not unordered and not resembling

not unordered and not resembling is an episodic journey through memory, disorientation, and altered states of consciousness. Mapping through tape and sound provides a landscape for movement to reveal individual and collective experiences. Through live performance Jen McGinn, iele paloumpis, and Joanna Groom create a nonlinear structure in which all ideas have the possibility of connecting to all other ideas.

 

posted by Owner on June 27, 2014 at 6:45 pm

Tatyana Tenenbaum and Claudia La Rocco Performances

As part of the exhibition “Showing the Work,” curated by Sarah Fritchey, Franklin Street Works is presenting two free, public performances on Friday, June 27, featuring by Tatyana Tenenbaum and Claudia Rocco.

Friday, June 27 at 7:15pm, Tatyana and Ezra Tenenbaum perform “Prologue” from Private Country 
“Prologue” from Private Country is a duet created over the course of 2 1/2 years by siblings Ezra and Tatyana Tenenbaum.  The 14-minute was the result of embodied research into the continuum between spoken word and pitched singing.  The duet also serves as an overture or entr-acteto the evening length work Private Country, which Tatyana Tenenbaum describes as “a re-construction of American musical theater through my subjective memory, history and aesthetic desires.” For more on Tenenbaum, click HERE.
Friday, June 27 at 8:15pm, Claudia La Rocco performs “I just need one word and I can tell you everything” 
“Your hands are in fists, clenching; you are up on relevé with one foot in front and your flat back slides over an invisible horizontal plane. Don’t think about disaster. Don’t think about what his hands felt like against your thighs.”  I just need one word and I can tell you everything attempts to map the collision of internal and external realities. This is a solo performance in language, in which the body of the performer is rendered only through text. Running Time roughly 25 minutes.
posted by Owner on May 24, 2014 at 6:00 pm

The Sunken Living Room — Closing Party with Performance by Danna Vajda

Franklin Street Works is hosting a free, public closing party for “The Sunken Living Room” exhibition on Saturday, May 24 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm. The party will include a bar tending themed performance by exhibiting artist Danna Vajda at 7:00 pm.

Enjoy bar snacks, free wine, music while viewing this original, group exhibition that features artists exploring the recession through video, text, printmaking, sculpture, and photography. For more on the exhibition click HERE. To read the Stamford Advocate article on the show click HERE.

Danna Vajda’s performance is titled “thewateringhole” and takes the premise of the post-work drink, the beer, the glass of wine, the cocktail, the shot that creates a possible momentary breakage between a day’s work and oneself outside of work. The performance entails the mixing and serving of a series of classic drinks and cocktails while using a set of institutional letterhead paintings as recipe cue cards. The recipes contents bring together classic ingredients such as aromatic bitters or a cube of sugar, with exhaustion, muddled contradictions, always shaken, stirred and strained. Much like an instructional video, recipes are read aloud, the drinks mixed, served and then on to the next drink. Each recipe functions as an encrypted resignation letter signaling an impasse in the relation between individual and institutional identity.

Danna Vajda, is an artist and writer, born in Vancouver, Canada and based in Brooklyn,
New York. Recent exhibitions include both institutional spaces and provisional, less institutional spaces.

posted by Owner on April 24, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Tour of “The Sunken Living Room” with the curator and four exhibiting artists, Thursday, April 24 at 7pm

On Thursday, April 24 at 7:00 pm there is a guided tour of the current group exhibition, The Sunken Living Room. Those in attendance will walk through the show with the show’s curator, Terri C Smith, and four exhibiting artists: Michael Bell-Smith, Jonah Emerson-Bell, Danna Vajda and Constantina Zavitsanos. While touring the three galleries, artists will discuss their works, including how videos and installations reflect themes in the exhibition and fit in with their overall practice. The evening will end with an open discussion and reception in the café. Please join us for this free event that is open to the public – a unique opportunity to explore the current show with emerging figures in contemporary art!

ABOUT THE PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

Michael Bell-Smith in an artist based in Brooklyn, NY. His work has been exhibited and screened in museums and galleries internationally, including MoMA PS1, NY; Museum of The Moving Image, NY; SFMOMA, San Francisco; The 2008 Liverpool Biennial, UK; The 5th Seoul International Media Biennale; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, ES; The New Museum, NY; Hirshhorn Museum, DC; Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; MoMA, NY; and Tate Liverpool, UK. His work has been featured in Art Forum, Art in America and the New York Times. He is an Assistant Professor of New Media at Purchase College.

Photo by Garen Barsegian

Jonah Emerson-Bell is a sculptor who lives and works in Brooklyn NY. By using a variety of materials including found objects, bronze and neon, his work deals with themes ranging from history to humor, from economy to witchcraft. He was part of the Shadow Shop exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and his work was featured on the cover of the summer 2010 issue of Bookforum. He was involved in the Music Box project in New Orleans in 2011.

Danna Vajda is an artist and writer based in Brooklyn, New York. Recent exhibitions include both institutional spaces and provisional, less institutional spaces.

Constantina Zavitsanos is an artist whose practice engages the sculptural surfaces and temporalities of performance, text, projection and sound. She works with concepts of intimacy, consent, and contraction–especially as related to debt and dependency. Zavitsanos attended the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, and has shared work at Slought Foundation in Philadelphia, with Cage at MoMA PS1, and at the Hessel Museum at Bard College.

 

posted by Owner on March 13, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Fair Tomatoes: Documentary Film Screening and Discussion

Franklin Street Works is pleased to present the new documentary film Fair Tomatoes: A Story About Justice, Dignity, and Sustainability on Thursday, March 13 at 7:00 pm, followed by a Q & A with its directors, Ernie Zahn and Ron Williams. The 25-minute film focuses on the plight of farmworkers in Immokalee, Florida, and their organized efforts to correct abuses and wage issues that persist today. This free, public screening with the film’s directors invites the community to join in conversation about fair-food practices and workers’ rights. It’s an informative and inspiring event for everyone, including food lovers, consumer advocates, chefs, and civil liberties activists! Franklin Street Works will feature a tomato-inspired snack and each audience member will receive one complimentary beer or wine.

Immokalee, Florida, is the tomato capital of America, but it is also home to abuse, stagnant wages, mistreatment, and unjust labor conditions. In the last decade, the workers have organized the Coalition of Immokalee Workers. The group hopes to raise awareness about corporate social responsibility, community organizing, and sustainable food, while also ending modern-day slavery and other labor abuses. The film explores their efforts in Southwest Florida, but also addresses what restaurants, chefs, and consumers can do to support sustainable food practices.

Produced by All Kicker, the Greenwich-based arts and activism blog, in association with Taranta, a Boston North-end restaurant dedicated to socially responsible food practices, the film is currently on tour to increase the visibility of this issue and to continue to make the workers’ experience part of the conversation on sustainability.

This program precedes a related exhibition, “The Sunken Living Room,” which opens March 22 and focuses on labor, debt, banking and other issues surrounding the recession as seen through the work of fifteen contemporary artists.

ABOUT ERNIE ZAHN: Ernie Zahn is the current Executive Director of NPeaches. He began his media filmmaking career in high school with his first short film which went on to be screened in film festivals domestically and internationally. His skills in media merged with his activism shortly after college when he was hired by Mozilla Foundation to be a part of the organizing team for the Open Video Conference, an annual event focusing on issues such as digital rights, human rights and egalitarianism through online video. Ernie has since gone on to found a social justice non-profit that focuses in media, NPeaches – seving as the parent company to All Kicker.

ABOUT RON WILLIAMS: Ron Williams is a producer at NPeaches. Applying his skills in kendo, fencing, and other martial arts, Ron entered the film industry as a fight choreographer. He later moved in front of the camera as the host of the web series Ronaldo Tours, a food and travel series focuses on Italian culture in America. Ron has since moved into various roles in filmmaking through NPeaches as one of the organization’s founding members.

posted by Owner on March 8, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Closing Dance Party for the exhibition “Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art”

Franklin Street Works will host an exhibition closing party for “Neuromast”.  Co-curator Taliesin Gilkes-Bower and several exhibiting artists will be here to say goodbye to this group exhibition on Saturday, March 8 from 7:00 – 10:00 pm. With special extended hours, the party for Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art is a great opportunity to share Stamford’s contemporary art gem with friends and family. Come dance, snack, drink and check out this intriguing, original exhibition before it closes!

Taliesin Gilkes-Bower is a DJ and producer who has worked across the Western Hemisphere. He has DJ’d at such hot spots as the Wythe Hotel in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and has worked on music projects internationally. He will be joined by Sean Oloane (DJ OS), a Florida transplant whose been making some of the North Easts most essential stoner metal with his band Cool World. Both are fascinated by regional dance genres, autonomous musical ecologies, and post-ethnographic field recordings. They will be exploring their deep collections of analog and digital audio recordings.

Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art is an exhibition that explores “emergence,” the theory that says unforeseeable results happen when a system reaches a certain level of complexity. The show’s title is inspired by a very specific emergent phenomenon, “neuromast,” which is the sensory organ that allows fish to effectively behave in unison against the threat of predators. Neuromast features sculpture, videos, text-based works, photographs and more by contemporary artists, writers and theorists interested in theories of emergence.  Exhibiting artists are: Kari Altmann, Christian Bök and Micah Lexier, Ingrid Burrington, Kaye Cain-Nielsen, Mircea Cantor, hint.fm, David Horvitz, Brian House and Jason Rabie, Juliana Huxtable, Thilde Jensen, Carolyn Lazard, M. M. Mantua, Preemptive Media, Robert Spahr, Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle’s Sexecology collaboration, and The Waterwhisper Ilse. The exhibition is curated by Taliesin Gilkes-Bower and Terri C Smith and is on view through March 9, 2014.

posted by Owner on March 1, 2014 at 5:30 pm

An Evening with Artist Juliana Huxtable: Reading and Performance

On Saturday, March 1 from 5:30 – 7:30, please join us for a performative reading by Juliana Huxtable, one of the exhibiting artists in “Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art“.

Juliana Huxtable and a number of her NYC contemporaries will be reading and performing a diverse body of work that highlight new voices in New York’s growing underground. Themes of the body, technology and identity will be explored. Juliana Huxtable is a writer, artist and DJ based in New York City. She creates and speaks from the positions of cyborg, priestess, witch, and trans girl. Her writing has appeared or been referenced in ArtForumMousse, and Maker Magazine. She has read and performed at New York City venues such as Envoy Enterprises, Brooklyn Academy of Music and Artists Space. For more on Juliana Huxtable, check out this INTERVIEW.

posted by Owner on February 27, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Become Your Unlimited Self: Workshop and Talk with Diane Pauley

Become Your Unlimited Self is a workshop and talk that takes place on Thursday, February 7 from 7:00 – 9:00pm at Franklin Street Works. This event is in synch with Franklin Street Works’ tradition of highlighting emerging thinkers and doers in the region as part of our ongoing programming. Since graduating college, Diane Pauley, who goes by the “PostGrad Coach,” has watched her peers struggle to find jobs and then settle in positions that, according to Pauley “knocked the passion right out of them”.  This prompted her to start PostGradolescence, a coaching platform to teach millennials how to overcome their limited resources, make their art profitable and feel confident enough to be their own boss.  The event is both a talk, and a workshop.

About Diane Pauley: Diane Pauley is the PostGrad Coach who learned how to harness her art and do it for a living. She is now helping other millennials do the same – build up their art and be their own boss  – at Postgradolescence.com. Pauley works with creative millennials and teaches them how to make their art profitable. By adding the right business components to their message, Diane’s clients have been able to build up service-based businesses.

 

posted by Owner on February 22, 2014 at 7:00 pm

Eat for Equity Event to Benefit Franklin Street Works

Eat For Equity Stamford is kicking off 2014 with a fun and exciting event benefitting Franklin Street Works! The dinner is Saturday, February 22 from 7:00 – 10:00 pm. The Exhibition “Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art” is on view during the event and features videos, sculptures, and photographs by artists working in New York City; Toronto, Canada; Paris, France; Providence, Rhode Island; and Carbondale, Illinois. The exhibition explores the theme of “emergence,” which posits that one cannot predict results of a system once it reaches a certain type and level of complexity.

Eat for Equity cooks will integrate some of the exhibition themes into their menu, which features breakfast for dinner! Come join us in enjoying good food, good people, good art, and good times! All are welcome to join with a suggested donation of $15-20 or give what you can! RSVP not required but helpful in estimating food. To RSVP, click HERE.

posted by Owner on February 20, 2014 at 6:30 pm

Connecting Over Missed Connections: A Talk with New York Artist Ingrid Burrington

Please join us Thursday, February 20  from 6:30 – 8:00 pm for Ingrid Burrington’s Talk on her project, “The Center for Missed Connections”.

With Valentine’s Day, after seeing stores stock up with flowers, hearts and chocolate boxes, we are reminded that love is in the air. Feeling like we are missing out on this sort of love connection is at the core of Ingrid Burrington’s Center for Missed Connections project, which maps and studies loneliness and romantic longing in cities through the missed connections section of Craigslist. Join Franklin Street Works on Thursday, February 20 from 6:30 – 8:00 pm for “Connecting Over Missed Connections,” a conversation with New York-based artist, Ingrid Burrington. This free, public event also includes one complimentary Valentine’s Day cocktail for each guest!

The Center For Missed Connections project started with Burrington’s simple question, “What is the loneliest place in New York City?” As she started to do research, the missed connections sections of Craigslist seemed to be the perfect place to start. This section, exclusive to Craigslist, is a common zone of loneliness in print that is also a free-for-all dialogue of venting, longing, and spamming. Burrington explains, “Analysis of Craigslist Missed Connections postings and communities offers a glimpse into the loneliness and sexual tension that serve as the linchpin of any thriving metropolitan environment.” Read more about this project HERE.

Ingrid Burrington’s Taxonomy of Missed Connections, part of Center for Missed Connections, is a mapping of missed connections in New York City, and is currently on view in Franklin Street Works’ Neuromast: Certain Uncertainty and Contemporary Art show. The exhibition, curated by Taliesen Gilkes-Bower and Terri C Smith, is on view through March 9. The show explores “emergence,” the theory that says unforeseeable results happen when a system reaches a certain level of complexity. Exhibiting artists are: Kari Altmann, Christian Bök and Micah Lexier, Ingrid Burrington, Kaye Cain-Nielsen, Mircea Cantor, hint.fm, David Horvitz, Brian House and Jason Rabie, Juliana Huxtable, Thilde Jensen, Carolyn Lazard, M. M. Mantua, Preemptive Media, Robert Spahr, Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle’s Sexecology collaboration, and The Waterwhisper Ilse.

ABOUT INGRID BURRINGTON: Ingrid Burrington is an artist and writer living on a small island off the coast of America. There is more information about her at lifewinning.com

posted by Owner on November 23, 2013 at 5:00 pm

ART SHOP! The Sale and Party to Benefit Franklin Street Works, Saturday, November 23

In celebration of our two-year anniversary, Franklin Street Works is hosting its first fundraiser party on Saturday, November 23 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm! Buy tickets HERE!

The fundraiser will highlight the collaborations in contemporary art, urban planning, publishing, new media and other fields that have made the space a leading cultural destination in the region. The accompanying exhibition (Nov. 2 – Dec. 1) will be a pop-up shop featuring portable multiples made by artists who exhibited here in our first two years.

Items will include zines, videos, calendars, glasses, buttons, artists books and more! They will be available at sale prices from $3.00 and up, giving everyone a chance to take something home. Works will only be for sale at the November 23 party.  Participating Artists: Michael Asbill, Trisha Baga, Francis Cape, Holly Danger, Choi Dachal and Jennyfer HaddadChristopher DeLaurenti, Simon Draper, Matt Ducklo, Stuart Elster, Lindsey Eskind, Kent EvansBethany Fancher, Flint Public Art Project, Flower Tour, T Foley, Marley Freeman, Ben Goddard, Ilana Halperin, Veronica Hryn,  Jared Haug, Rachel Higgins, Ann Hirsch, Dana Hoey, David Horvitz, Tehching Hsieh, Hudson Valley Seed Library, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Renee Kahn, Tara Kelton, Karsten Krejcarek and Seth Kelly, Emily Larned, Mads Lynnerup, NPeaches, Jeff Ostergren, Andrea Reynosa, Emily Roz and Carmelle Safdie, Joshua Seidner, Trevor Shimzu, Brooke Singer and Ricardo Miranda, Gordon Skinner, Stephen Sollins, Rbt. Sps., Second FrontBrent Stewart, Penelope Umbrico, Siebren Versteeg, Linda Weintraub, Grant Worth, Helen Zajowski, Dzmitry Zhykh.

We would like to thanks our lead sponsor, Seaboard Properties and our in-kind sponsors to date: Half Full Brewery and cafe oo la la.

General admission: $35.00


Members: $25.00 


Students: $25.00  

Show your general admission ticket at Franklin Street Works at any time for a discounted membership. 

Tickets will also be available at the door the night of the event.

Lead Sponsor 

 

 

 

In-kind Sponsors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Design by: Bonnie Moncada and Diogo Sales

posted by Owner on September 12, 2013 at 7:00 pm

Outdoor Movie “Night Buttoners,” directed by Petr Zelenkafrom 7:00 – 9:00 pm

Kool-Aid Wino exhibiting artist, Rotem Linial, will curate the second screening of Franklin Street Works outdoor film series on Thursday, September 12th. That evening will feature the 1997 Czech film, Buttoners, directed by Petr Zelenka.

Franklin Street Works is pleased to announce a series of three outdoor film screenings on its back patio during the month of September! As summer comes to a close and days become shorter, what could be better than cozying up outside and enjoying free outdoor films right in downtown Stamford? Thursday night screenings will take place on September 5th, 12th, and 19th from 7:00 – 9:00 pm. The film choices are inspired by Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, Kool-Aid Wino, which foregrounds mistakes and missteps in contemporary art. A film expert will curate each screening for these casual, social events, which also promise to bring various perspectives and create new connections to the exhibition. These free, public events will include special cocktails inspired by each film and snacks such as popcorn and hotdogs for an all-American movie experience.

Kool-Aid Wino is an exhibition that explores the foregrounding of mistakes and missteps in contemporary art practices and features works by Anne Carson, Choi Dachal, Frank Heath, Owen Land, Rotem Linial, James Merrill, Alice Miceli, Jenny Perlin, and Aki Sasamoto, as well as an ikat silk suzani textile made in the early twenties. By highlighting or even celebrating errors, the art in this show redeem flaws, accentuate their value, and open up myriad new possibilities.

 

posted by Owner on September 11, 2013 at 4:00 pm

Reception and Symposium for “Collective Action Archive” at Purchase College

A reception for the exhibition “Collective Action Archive” will take place at Purchase College’s Passage Gallery gallery on Wednesday, September 11, from 4:00 – 6:00 pm, followed by a symposium at the Neuberger Museum of Art Study (also on Purchase campus) of Purchase College from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. Both events are free and open to the public. The symposium will include author, artist, and activist Gregory Sholette; along with Lise Soskolne from Working Artists and the Greater Economy (W.A.G.E.); and Brian House of the Knifeandfork collective.

The New Media program at Purchase College, SUNY and Franklin Street Works, a contemporary art space in Stamford, CT, organized this group exhibition, which is on view at Purchase College’s The Passage Gallery, beginning September 6. Curated and coordinated by Purchase College faculty and students along with the Franklin Street Works team, the exhibition kicks off the 2013 season at the school’s student gallery. The show features ephemera, documentation, and publications that include photos, videos, zines, and books from more than 30 artist collectives from across the U.S., including Chicago, New York, Pittsburgh, Winston-Salem, and San Francisco. “Collective Action Archive” will be on view from September 6 – 29, 2013.

 

posted by Owner on September 7, 2013 at 5:30 pm

Kool-Aid Wino Walking Tour with Curator Claire Barliant

Franklin Street Works presents a  guided tour of the current group exhibition, Kool-Aid Wino, with its curator, Claire Barliant, Saturday, September 7. The event begins at 5:30 and we will extend our hours through 7:00 pm for the tour and casual discussion over a thematic, complimentary cocktail.

A Brooklyn-based writer and curator, Barliant has written about art in publications such as Artforum, Art in America, and the New Yorker. This walkthrough will give visitors a rare opportunity to explore the art in Franklin Street Works’ three galleries with the show’s curator in a casual, conversational setting. Barliant will share her thinking on the exhibition’s theme and its artists.  Join us for this free, public event and hear more about the role of trial and error in contemporary art. This event program is made possible, in part, through a two-year grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.


Kool-Aid Wino is an exhibition that explores the foregrounding of mistakes and missteps in contemporary art practices and features works by Anne Carson, Choi Dachal, Frank Heath, Owen Land, Rotem Linial, James Merrill, Alice Miceli, Jenny Perlin, and Aki Sasamoto, as well as an ikat silk suzani textile made in the early twenties. By highlighting or even celebrating errors, the art works in this show redeem flaws, accentuate their value, and open up myriad new possibilities. Barliant explains, “Cumulatively the works reminds us that uniqueness relies on flaws and our imaginative negotiation in, around, and through them.” The title of the show comes from a chapter in the book Trout Fishing in America by Richard Brautigan, who deliberately fudged words while writing in order to invent new ways of saying things. Kool-Aid Wino is on view through September 29, 2013.

ABOUT CLAIRE BARLIANT:

Claire Barliant has lived in New York City for the past fifteen years, except for seven months when she lived in Houston around 2004-05. Her various jobs during that time have included stamping words on rubber bands (when she worked for an artist who sold soaps, perfumes, and rubber bands with words stamped on them in upscale shops like Barney’s and Moss), fact-checking for the Village Voice, packing up props for a Wes Anderson film, and numerous editorial gigs at art magazines. Today she writes, edits, teaches, and curates.

posted by Owner on September 5, 2013 at 7:00 pm

Movie Nights: September 5th, 12th, and 19th

Franklin Street Works is having a series of three outdoor film screenings on its back patio during September! As summer comes to a close and days become shorter, what could be better than cozying up outside and enjoying free outdoor films right in downtown Stamford? Thursday night screenings will take place on September 5th, 12th, and 19th from 7:00 – 9:00 pm. The film choices are inspired by Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, Kool-Aid Wino, which foregrounds mistakes and missteps in contemporary art. A film expert will curate each screening for these casual, social events, which also promise to bring various perspectives and create new connections to the exhibition. These free, public events will include special cocktails inspired by each film and snacks such as popcorn and hotdogs for an all-American movie experience.

The first film, Buster Keaton’s critically acclaimed classic The General (1926), will be shown at 7:00 pm on September 5th. It was chosen by Erin Shea, a Stamford, Connecticut, resident and the curator of Darien Library’s film series, “Friday Night Features.” Ripe with foregrounded mistakes, the film will provide silent movie slapstick through brilliant physical humor. It’s no small feat to make a pie-in-the-face funny, but the physical humor replete in classic silent films still holds up today. In one of the most famous chase scenes in film history, pretty much everything goes wrong and it is a delight watching Keaton try to make up for it.

Kool-Aid Wino exhibiting artist, Rotem Linial, will curate the second screening on Thursday, September 12th. That evening Franklin Street Works will feature the 1997 Czech film, Buttoners, directed by Petr Zelenka. A third guest curator (TBA) will choose the final film, scheduled for September 19th.

Kool-Aid Wino is an exhibition that explores the foregrounding of mistakes and missteps in contemporary art practices and features works by Anne Carson, Choi Dachal, Frank Heath, Owen Land, Rotem Linial, James Merrill, Alice Miceli, Jenny Perlin, and Aki Sasamoto, as well as an ikat silk suzani textile made in the early twenties. By highlighting or even celebrating errors, the art in this show redeem flaws, accentuate their value, and open up myriad new possibilities.

 

posted by Owner on August 29, 2013 at 6:00 pm

Aki Sasamoto: Screening of “It’s hard to relate to you, (indoor version)”

Franklin Street Works will screen Aki Sasamoto’s performance,  It’s hard to relate to you, (indoor version), followed by a Q & A with the artist via Skype ,Thursday, August 29 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. Following the 20 minute screening, we will Skype with Sasamoto and open it up to an informal discussion where the artist will discuss how her performance was part of the process in creating the sculpture for Kool-Aid Wino. This free, public event promises to shed light on performance as a tool for making objects and its larger role in museums and galleries.

When entering Franklin Street Works, viewers are greeted with a top-heavy sculpture Aki Sasamoto created during the opening reception. Domestic furnishings combined and augmented with a mix of text, tape, and concrete are at once precarious and intimidating, elegant and chaotic.  For the opening reception of Kool-Aid Wino, Aki Sasamoto’s performance involved doing a “slow dance” with a large desk, accompanied by Bobby Hebb’s song “Sunny.” The artist also spoke about the “disease” of artists and the relationship between strategic and charismatic personalities, using Martha Stewart as an example of the latter. Sasamoto’s magic marker text on wood and etched words in concrete imbed the installation with cryptic messages from artist to viewer, hinting at the ideas and impulses behind its creation.

Kool-Aid Wino is an exhibition that explores the foregrounding of mistakes and missteps in contemporary art practices and features works by Anne Carson, Choi Dachal, Frank Heath, Owen Land, Rotem Linial, James Merrill, Alice Miceli, Jenny Perlin, and Aki Sasamoto, as well as an ikat silk suzani textile made in the early twenties. By highlighting or even celebrating errors, the art in this show redeem flaws, accentuate their value, and open up myriad new possibilities. Barliant explains, “Cumulatively the works reminds us that uniqueness relies on flaws and our imaginative negotiation in, around, and through them.” The title of the show comes from a chapter in the book Trout Fishing in America by Richard Brautigan, who deliberately fudges words while writing in order to invent new ways of saying things. Kool-Aid Wino is on view through September 22, 2013.

ABOUT AKI SASAMOTO:

Aki Sasamoto is a New York-based, Japanese artist, who works in performance, sculpture, dance, and whatever more medium that takes to get her ideas across. Her works have been shown both in performing art and visual art venues in New York and abroad. Besides her own works, she has collaborated with artists in visual arts, music, and dance, and she plays multiple roles of dancer, sculptor, or director.  Sasamoto co-founded Culture Push, a non-profit arts organization, in which diverse professionals meet through artist-led projects and cross-disciplinary symposia.

Sasamoto’s performance/installation works revolve around everyday gestures on nothing and everything.  Her installations are careful arrangements of sculpturally altered found objects, and the decisive gestures in her improvisational performances create feedback, responding to sound, objects, and moving bodies.  The constructed stories seem personal at first, yet oddly open to variant degrees of access, relation, and reflection. (http://www.akisasamoto.com)

Can’t make it to the screening? You can view the video of her performance HERE.

 

posted by Owner on June 15, 2013 at 3:00 pm

The Excess project comes to Stamford

“Excess” performance by Brooke Singer and Ricardo Miranda will take place
Saturday, June 15 from 3-6pm in Stamford Downtown. The performance will be followed by a Picnic from 6-8pm at Franklin Street Works.

Artists Ricardo Miranda and Brooke Singer will conduct a survey of restaurants in downtown Stamford to learn more about the food waste landscape. This information will be mapped and will be displayed along with their composting bicycle in a downtown storefront window. During Stamford’s art walk on June 15, the artist team will cycle around downtown Stamford on the bicycle, collecting waste from businesses, redistributing edible portions at a free public picnic at Franklin Street Works, and composting the remainder. For more on the Excess project visit http://www.excessnyc.org. This programming will be happening during Stamford’s first art walk!

posted by Owner on June 13, 2013 at 5:30 pm

Book Binding Workshop with Emily Larned

Are you a book lover and enjoy making your own unique publications? Then join Franklin Street Works and artist Emily Larned for a free, public bookbinding workshop on Thursday, June 13th from 5:30 – 7:00 pm where you will learn simple, non-adhesive book structures that are easily made without special materials or tools. These basic handmade books can be made as editions or unique works of art. This event is part of Strange Invitation programming and inspired by Franklin Street Works’ Reanimation Library branch, which features a physical collection of books that have fallen out of routine circulation.

“Marshall McLuhan said that when a technology becomes obsolete, it becomes an art form,” Larned says. “And that’s what we’re seeing with the book as it becomes supplanted by digital storage and search technologies.” So what else are books good for? Franklin Street Works’ Reanimation Library branch addresses some of these issues by making explicit what isn’t being digitized. In what is meant to inspire the production of new creative work, you will find books with a variety of illustration styles and printing techniques that have disappeared in most digital content due to the fact that photographs are now cheaper and quicker to make than illustrations.

Although the handmade book no longer serves its responsibility of recording the knowledge of humanity, it retains other qualities is has always had: a book is portable and requires no batteries or power, and a photocopied edition can be made inexpensively and distributed in public space anonymously. A book is finished in a moment in time, and is a great vehicle for aesthetic exploration, sharing of ideas, storytelling, and good old self-expression. “And maybe there’s also something to the fact that there will never be an untold number of other people accessing it at the same time,” Larned says. “It is limited and finite and physically inhabits the world – just like us.”

ABOUT EMILY LARNED:

Emily Larned has been self-publishing for 20 years, when she made her first zine Muffin Bones as a teenager in 1993. Since then, her artist publications have been collected by major institutions around the world including the V&A, the Tate Modern, The Smithsonian Institution, The J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Brooklyn Museum. She was a director of Brooklyn Artists Alliance for nearly a decade and co-established its education department. She also has taught basic bookbinding at every level from after-school programs through graduate workshops, including at Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA), University of Pennsylvania MFA program, and the Independent Publishing Resource Center (IPRC). Current work includes: Impractical Labor, an international member-organization-as-art-project for like-minded makers; Pleasure Beach Lives, a public park reclamation project in Bridgeport; and Land of Steady Habits, a zine/book series documenting progressive living in Connecticut. She’s currently Chair of Graphic design at SASD, University of Bridgeport.

 

posted by Owner on May 30, 2013 at 6:30 pm

An Incomplete Portrait of the Reanimation Library

Thursday, May 30 from 6:30 – 8:00 pm, Franklin Street Works will host An Incomplete Portrait of the Reanimation Library. This free, public event features Reanimation Library founder, Andrew Beccone, performing a set of short readings made up entirely of excerpts from the library’s holdings. The readings are paired with projected images from Reanimation Library’s image archive. Sequenced, unmediated fragments of found text and an accompanying stream of decontextualized images will provide a personalized, fractured, and incomplete portrait of the wide-ranging attitudes, ideologies, and visual systems contained within the collection. The event is in the casual, intimate environment of Franklin Street Works’ upstairs gallery.

Beccone’s performance is one of eight exhibition programs Franklin Street Works organized for the art space’s current group exhibition Strange Invitation, which includes a Reanimation Library branch featuring dozens of locally sourced books and artworks by Brooklyn based artist Pradeep Dalal. The performance takes place in the Reanimation Library FSW branch and lends a first- hand, experiential perspective on the library’s role as a generative source for making new artworks from the collection.

According to Beccone, these performances provide a platform to focus on texts found in the library’s collection, explaining, “I started doing readings from texts found in the library because I’ve become increasingly interested in and engaged with the language in the collection. A lot of the information in the library is very dry, and unlikely to have ever been read aloud. Most of it was not intended to be, but I have started unearthing small fragments – from a sentence to a few paragraphs – that strike me as particularly unusual. The Incomplete Portrait is a kind of way to let the library speak for itself.”

For more on Reanimation Library http://www.reanimationlibrary.org/

posted by Owner on May 23, 2013 at 6:00 pm

Art in the New City: Stephen Zacks

Join Franklin Street Works at the Stamford Innovation Center on Thursday, May 23, from 6:00 – 7:30 pm for “Art in the New City,” a talk by Brooklyn-based journalist, reporter and founder of the Flint Public Art Project, Stephen Zacks. Currently, Zacks is writing A Beautiful Ruin: The Generation that Transformed New York: 1967 – 1986. He will share his insights informed by a unique combination of historical research and hands-on experience to indicate how practices of public art and design can be put at the service of contemporary city-making. With Connecticut’s recent emphasis on ideas of “placemaking,” this is a highly anticipated conversation that will contribute to the regional dialogue about how contemporary art can invigorate towns and cities.

The talk will take place at the Stamford Innovation Center, located at the Old Town Hall, which is a new entrepreneurial hub in Stamford striving to create community-driven space and encouraging the free exchange of ideas and resources for start-up businesses. The perfect backdrop for Stephen Zacks’ talk on innovative urban art practices, the Stamford Innovation Center will join Franklin Street Works in hosting this free, public event.

As the Director of the Flint Public Art Project (FPAF), Stephen Zacks was one of three collaborators invited to participate in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, Strange Invitation (April 6 – June 16). This original Franklin Street Works show examines some of the relationships between art and activism that are happening around the country today. Zacks invited the emerging Flint artist collective Flower Tour to collaborate with him for the exhibition. Flower Tour blends fashion, performance, video and installation to bring color and excitement into public spaces. Their project is an extension of the FPAF’s mission, which, according to Zacks “draws on multiple artistic disciplines in an effort to transform the city’s image and identity, activate disused sites, connect places, and amplify the local culture.”

ABOUT STEPHEN ZACKS:

Flint Public Art Project founder and executive director Stephen Zacks is an internationally recognized architecture and urbanism reporter, theorist, and

1cultural producer based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and a native of Flint, Michigan. He received an M.A. in Liberal Studies from the New School for Social Research, served as an editor of Metropolis, and has received awards from the NY State Council on the Arts, Newtown Creek Fund, Graham Foundation, ArtPlace, MacDowell Colony, and the Warhol Foundation. Co-founder of the Bring to Light– Nuit Blanche New York festival, he is currently writing A Beautiful Ruin: The Generation that Transformed New York, 1967-1986, a nonfiction narrative about the role of contemporary artists in reinvigorating New York neighborhoods during the mid-70s fiscal crisis (Princeton Architectural Press, 2014).

ABOUT THE STAMFORD INNOVATION CENTER:

Featuring coworking, dedicated offices, conference facilities and a comprehensive slate of startup-centric classes and events, the Stamford Innovation Center, which opened in November 2012, is the ideal place for young enterprises to grow and interact with peers, mentors, investors, industry experts and service providers. For information on how to join our community, please visit www.stamfordicenter.com.

 

posted by Owner on May 4, 2013 at 10:30 am

Honey Locust Tree Relocation, Saturday, May 4

Connecticut meet up 10:30 a.m. at Franklin Street Works and walk to train station or join us at Stamford Train Station for 11:03 train (third car from end). New York meet up between 12:30 and 1:00 pm at Clocktower Gallery.

SIGN UP TODAY by emailing Sandrine@franklinstreetworks.org!

There are 55 Honey Locust trees growing in New York City’s Zuccotti Park, the central locale of the 2011 Occupy Walls Street protests. Artist David Horvitz collected the seeds from those trees in 2012 and is now germinating them at New York’s Clocktower Gallery. On Saturday, May 4, after his Clocktower artist residency ends, Horvitz will lead 55 people in carrying the seedlings (one plant per person). The group (consisting of CT and NY participants) will take a Metro North train to Franklin Street Works, which is 40 minutes outside of NYC in Stamford, Connecticut. The plants will continue to germinate at Franklin Street Works through June 16.

For this collaborative performance, Franklin Street Works and David Horvitz are enlisting participants to help carry the trees from Clocktower Gallery to Connecticut, stopping off at nearby Zuccotti Park in route. Horvitz sees one person carrying one plant as a poetic component, adding, “I really like the image of someone going across the Atlantic in the 17th, 18th, 19th century, in a boat, carrying a small apple branch, or rose cutting, ready to plant it in America.”

In germinating the Honey Locust trees, David Horvitz also considers the temporality of trees explaining, “The slowness of their pace is not subject to the world of the instantaneous and the immediate that we live in.” These trees can live up to 150 years and will continue to germinate at Franklin Street Works during the Strange Invitation exhibition. In June, Horvitz and Franklin Street Works will find permanent homes for the trees, ideally at public institutions such as museums, libraries, and college campuses.

We still need participants! So Franklin Street Works hopes that you can join us in taking part in this collaborative performance and to bear witness to the relocation of these Honey Locust trees. Connecticut participants will meet up at Franklin Street Works at 10:30 am, while those living in NYC will meet up at 12:30 am at the Clocktower Gallery. To sign up and be a part of the performance please email your RSVP to Sandrine@franklinstreetworks.org. For information on FSW support and options in purchasing Metro North tickets, please email terri@franklinstreetworks.org.

ABOUT DAVID HORVITZ: David Horvitz is an artist from California who is currently based in Brooklyn. He works in a variety of media, including photography, video, web-based work, publications, and watercolor.

 

posted by Owner on April 25, 2013 at 6:00 pm

Across Disciplines with Phyllis Sinrich and Ingrid Semaan

Please join Franklin Street Works for the launch of its “Across Disciplines” program on Thursday, April 25 from 6 – 7:30 pm. The Across Discipline events feature regional artists talking about their work alongside someone from a different discipline, — to create a dialogue that explores the visual arts from multiple viewpoints. For this program, local artist, Phyllis Sinrich, will be talking about her series of photographs titled “Mannequins: A Parallel Universe,” exploring the art world’s recent obsession with fashion, and how mannequins play a powerful role as fashion’s avatars.  She will be paired with Professor Ingrid Semaan, Director of Women’s Studies at UConn, Stamford, who will talk about Sinrich’s series from the perspective of female identity in concert with advertising, fashion, and consumption. This free, public,event provides additional opportunities for regional artists and thinkers to share their work with the public, while paying close attention to the fluid relationships between the visual arts, the humanities, and popular culture.

Phyllis Sinrich’s portfolio of mannequins includes more than twenty images from her travels in countries such as Hungary, France, Italy, Turkey, Croatia and the United States. According to the artist, the facial expressions, postures and individuality of the mannequins is what has kept her intrigued and transfixed, explaining “it’s fascinating to note both the similarities and differences that are manifested through each society’s mannequin ‘population’”. “Mannequins: A Parallel Universe” is part of Phyllis Sinrich’s solo exhibition, The Thrill of Discovery, at The Gallery at Bistro Latino in Old Greenwich, CT, on view through April 30.

ABOUT PHYLLIS SINRICH: In 2001 Phyllis Sinrich turned a passion for photography — which had been a hobby since childhood — into her “third life.” Her work is exhibited regularly in juried shows in the area, most notably the annual Faber Birren National Color Award Show at the Stamford Art Association, where she has won several sponsored awards over the years. In 2003 one of her abstract images was a First Place winner in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution Annual National Photo Competition. Her work has also been shown at other venues such as the Katonah Museum of Art in Katonah, NY; Silvermine Guild Arts Center in New Canaan, CT; the Edward Hopper House Art Center in Nyack, NY; the Fairfield Museum and History Center, the Quick Center of the Arts, and the General Electric World Headquarters, all in Fairfield, CT.

ABOUT INGRID SEMAAN: Ingrid Semaan is a committed feminist activist who has worked on campaigns against violence against women and for reproductive rights, workers’ rights, and peace and justice in the Middle East.  Ingrid received her Ph.D. in Sociology in 2006 from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. She teaches in Sociology and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and she is the Director of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality at the University of Connecticut-Stamford.  Her research interests include gendered violence, the battered women’s movement, and health disparities.

 

posted by Owner on April 23, 2013 at 11:20 am

Linda Weintraub talk, April 23, 11:20 – 12:35 at UConn, Stamford campus

ART What Thou EAT: Innovation in Food / Art / Ecosystems, a lecture by Linda Weintraub 

VIDEO

ART What Thou EAT: Innovation in Food / Art / Ecosystems is a talk presented by Linda Weintraub at UConn, Stamford.

This lecture explores the dynamic issues at work today in art, food and social practice, addressing questions such as : Why does art change over time? Why is innovation a measure of great art? Linda Weintraub is an artist, curator, educator, homesteader, and the author of TO LIFE! Eco Art in Pursuit of a Sustainable Planet (2012), the first eco-art textbook for college art and environmental studies students. Weintraub shared her knowledge on the topic with 40 UConn, Connecticut, art history students.

 

 

posted by Owner on April 13, 2013 at 3:00 pm

Stamford Art Association Reanimation Library Collage Workshop

On Saturday, April 13 from 3:00 – 5:00 pm, the Stamford Art Association’s Richard Tedeschi and Carolyn Lyngholm will lead a collaging workshop using the the books at Franklin Street Works branch of the Reanimation Library.

The workshop is, in part, preparation for an exhibition of Reanimation Library inspired works at the Ferguson Library, on view from May 30 – September 19, 2013. Click HERE for exhibition submission requirements.

posted by Owner on March 14, 2013 at 5:30 pm

Tour Your Content Will Return Shortly with three of the exhibiting artists

ARCHIVE: REVIEW

Join Franklin Street Works on Thursday, March 14 from 5:30 – 7:00 pm for a casual tour of the contemporary art space’s current exhibition, Your Content Will Return Shortly. Those in attendance will walk through the show with three of its exhibiting artists, Jeff Ostergren (New Haven, CT), Catherine Ross (Brooklyn, NY) and Siebren Versteeg (Brooklyn, NY). While walking through the three galleries, artists will discuss their works, including how videos and installations reflect themes in the exhibition and relate to their larger practice.

The evening will end with an open discussion and reception in the café. Please join us for this free event that is open to the public – a unique opportunity to explore the current show with some of its artists that are emerging figures in contemporary art today!  This event program is made possible in part through the support of the Community Arts Partnership Program awarded to Franklin Street Works by the City of Stamford and a two-year grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Your Content Will Return Shortly, curated by Franklin Street Works’ Creative Director, Terri C Smith, explores television as both medium and subject. Rather than taking a comprehensive view of television as inspiration in contemporary art, the exhibition explores works that highlight televised elements tangential to the main narrative arc. The artists take their cues from the physical and functional qualities of television and a variety of elements associated with broadcasting. They touch on phenomena that include: advertising; laugh tracks; the affects of VHS, DVD and remote control devices on viewing habits; public service announcements; and nuances observations of the relationship between spectacle and cable news. Exhibiting artists are: Christopher DeLaurenti, Eric Gottesman, Jonathan Horowitz, Sophy Naess, Jeff Ostergren, Lucy Raven, Martha Rosler, Catherine Ross, Emily Roz, Carmelle Safdie, and Siebren Versteeg. Your Content Will Return Shortly is on view at Franklin Street Works through March 24.

posted by Owner on March 2, 2013 at 3:00 pm

A Conversation With Reanimation Library Founder Andrew Beccone

Franklin Street Works and The Ferguson Library are happy to announce a conversation with Reanimation Library founder, Andrew Beccone, on Saturday, March 2, from 3:00 – 4:15 at the Ferguson Library auditorium in Stamford, CT. There will be a reception at Franklin Street Works from 4:15 – 5:30 pm, after the talk! Reanimation Library is one of three collaborators involved in Franklin Street Works’ upcoming exhibition, Strange Invitation (April 4 – June 2013.) For the talk, Andrew Beccone will discuss the mission of his independent library and explain the temporary Franklin Street Works’ branch that he is creating for Strange Invitation. The branch library created for the exhibition will be open for public use, encouraging daily audience participation and hosting related programs. During the show’s run Franklin Street Works will also present collaborative workshops and projects in association with the Stamford Art Association and the Loft Artists Association.

Andrew Beccone book hunting in CT for the Franklin Street Works branch.

Reanimation Library is a small Independent Presence Library, meaning a non-circulating collection that exists in the physical world. It is open to the public and is meant to inspire the production of new creative work. Reanimation Library features a collection of books that have fallen out of routine circulation and are acquired for their unique visual content. Outdated and discarded, they have been culled from thrift stores, stoop sales, and throw-away piles to be given new life as a resource for artists, writers, cultural archeologists, and other interested parties. “I consider the library itself to be an ongoing collaborative artwork that is activated by people who engage with and use it,” Andrew Beccone explains. Since 2006, the library has been situated in Proteus Gowanus, an interdisciplinary gallery and reading room in Brooklyn, NY.

Reanimation Library, main branch, Brooklyn, NY

Since 2009, Andrew Beccone has created branch libraries that are temporary site-specific manifestations of the Reanimation Library. This allows the library to exist outside of its Brooklyn home, giving the possibility of others to engage with its content. Each branch library contains a collection of books that has been gathered from sources in its local community. For Franklin Street Works’ branch, the library will contain books from the Fairfield County area as well as Reanimation Library inspired artworks by New York based artist Pradeep Dalal. A free scanner and photocopier will be provided to allow visitors to use the books as resource material for their own creative projects. For more information on the Reanimation Library, visit: http://www.reanimationlibrary.org/

posted by Owner on December 15, 2012 at 2:30 pm

Bibbe Hansen and Second Front at Franklin Street Works!

Join us for a multiverse performance lead on site by Bibbe Hansen and including a virtual performance by the international artist collective Second Front Saturday, December 15, 2:30 – 4:30pm

Please join Franklin Street Works on Saturday, December 15 from 2:30 – 4:30pm for an afternoon performance by the international virtual performance art collective, Second Front. The event will begin with an intro with Second Front member Bibbe Hansen, followed by a live, streaming performance by Second Front from 3:00-4:00pm, and ending with a casual Q and A session. The group is one of the contributing collectives featured as part of the “collective action” theme in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, Working Alternatives: Breaking Bread, Art Broadcasting and Collective Action. Second Front is the first performance art group in the online virtual world of Second Life, where participants create avatars who interact in real time across virtual/actual realities.

Founded in 2006, Second Front is a seven-member troupe that includes Patrick Lichty (US), Scott Kildall (US), Liz Solo (Canada), Bibbe Hansen (US), Yael Gilks (UK), Gaz (Italy), and Doug Jarvis (Australia). The group has performed extensively in galleries and museums all over the world. The artists perform remotely while their performance is screened in a venue where one or more members may be physically present. Their performances have been streamed live in New York, Los Angeles, Moscow, Brussels, Berlin, Vancouver and many other cities. They have been written about in publications including ArtForum, Art in America, Realtime Arts (Australia), Exibart (Italy) and Digital Art, Second Edition (by Christiane Paul).

For Franklin Street Works’ free, public event, Second Front member, Bibbe Hansen will be on site. Bibbe Hansen is a performance artist, actress and musician. She is the daughter of Fluxus artist Al Hansen, and the mother of pop musician, Beck. A longtime participant in avant-garde contemporary art communities, Hansen participated in her father’s “Happenings,” and Fluxus performances. She was Pop artist Andy Warhol’s youngest “Superstar,” starring with Edie Sedgwick in Warhol’s film “Prison.”

This is a unique opportunity to see a live performance by this international group of artists in Stamford, Connecticut. We hope you will join us at Franklin Street Works for this edifying and entertaining look at what happens when art-historically informed performance art utilizes today’s technologies via the vision of these accomplished artists!

posted by Owner on November 29, 2012 at 6:00 pm

Working Alternatives: Tour and Conversation!

Join us for a conversation about food, broadcasting, and socially engaged action in contemporary art!

Do you want to know more about our current exhibition, Working Alternatives: Breaking Bread, Art Broadcasting, and Collective Action? We invite you to meander through the galleries with the Franklin Street Works team this Thursday, November 29, from 6-7 pm. The event is free and open to the public.

We welcome your company and conversation so please feel free to drop by early to enjoy a beer and peruse art books in the cafe or give the exhibition’s videos and artist collective archive some extra viewing time before the tour begins.

Franklin Street Works Creative Director, Terri C Smith, and Gallery Manager, Sandrine Milet, will lead a casual tour of and conversation about the exhibition, which was co-curated by Mackenzie Schneider, Jess Wilcox, and Terri C Smith.

Most of the artists in the show have exhibited internationally, including historic figures — such as a pioneer in creating public access art programming and a founding member of the 1960s art movement of Fluxus — and emerging artists who use food, video, and action to shift our thinking about everything from performance art to women’s health issues, to food as a medium in exploring memorial and democracy.

Artists: Paul Branca, Jaime Davidovich, ESP TV, Group Material,Ann Hirsch, Alison Knowles, Tom Marioni, Anna Ostoya, Legacy Russell, Chris Sollars and Jerome Waag. Artist collectives involved will constantly evolve and grow, they include:   Conflict Kitchen, Fierce Pussy, Howling Mob Society, JustSeeds, M12 Studios, Paper Tiger, Philly Stake, The Pinky Show, Second Front, SubRosa, Temporary Services, and W.A.G.E.

 

posted by Owner on November 10, 2012 at 3:00 pm

E.S.P. TV Filming

Franklin Street Works is excited to announce that E.S.P. TV, (http://www.esptvnyc.com/) an analog-based broadcast group in New York City, is taping their latest episode at our space Saturday, November 10, from 3-7 pm. The free, public event will include experimental sound, video, and performance artists from New York and Connecticut. The episode will be filmed in front of a live, studio audience and is slated to air on cable access stations in Fairfield County and/or Manhattan. Please join us for this unique opportunity to be part of the E.S.P.TV   audience this Saturday night! The café will be open until 5:00pm during filming, but audience members are welcome to hang out until the performance has ended. Following the event, stay tuned for air times, which will be posted on Franklin Street Works’ website and social media!

Performing artists include: Lea Bertucci; Brooklyn-based band The Dreebs; artist/comedian Heather Guertin; Patrick Higgins (Z’s), with videos by LOGAN OWLBEEMOTH and more, including a handful of collaboratively inclined artists and musicians from the region.

Formed in 2011, E.S.P. TV opened a space in Williamsburg during the summer of 2012. That space serves as a locale for the production of their show and regular screenings, events, and performances. Tapings of E.S.P. TV are in front of an audience with live green-screening, signal manipulation and analog video mixing. The entire night is recorded to VHS and edited into half hour episodes for airing on cable TV in New York City. Many are filmed in a variety of locations ranging from living rooms in Brooklyn, to alternatives spaces around the world. E.S.P. TV episodes are broadcasted Tuesdays at 10pm on MNN4, TW Channel 67, NYC and www.mnn.org.

The E.S.P. TV shoot is one of several events and off-site artworks created as part of Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition, Working Alternatives: Breaking Bread, Art Broadcasting and Collective Action. The E.S.P. TV taping is part of curator Mackenzie Schneider’s “Art Broadcasting” segment. In “Art Broadcasting,” Schneider examines artists using media such as radio, television, and newspapers as alternative venues for presenting work. E.S.P. TV is a contemporary example how artists use broadcasting as a way to share art with the larger public.

 

posted by Owner on October 4, 2012 at 6:00 pm

Walk Through of VHS The Exhibition with the Franklin Street Works Team.

Join Franklin Street Works on Thursday, October 4 from 6:00 – 6:45 pm for a guided tour of VHS The Exhibition, with Franklin Street Works’ Creative Director, Terri C Smith, and Gallery Manager, Sandrine Milet.

The tour is followed by vodka cocktails in the cafe courtesy of MINSK Vodka! With mild aromas of nut toast and honeycomb you might want to taste it solo first, but we will also have — celebrating the horror movie sub-theme of VHS The Exhibition — Bloody Mary mix and a couple of other mixer options, so everyone can enjoy a refreshing beverage as we talk about the videos and discuss our memories analog.

This conversational walk through will answer questions related to the exhibition and gives audiences the opportunity to discuss the show’s theme, it’s pop culture and contemporary art relevance, and how it fits within Franklin Street Works’ mission. Join us for a free public event and bring a friend to explore the current show with some of the folks closest to it!

Creative Director, Terri C Smith, and Gallery Manager, Sandrine Milet, get into character for their tour.. poses inspired by the "Blood Beach" poster in the background.

VHS The exhibition, curated by video specialist and writer Rebecca Cleman, is Franklin Street Works’ second guest curated show. The exhibition explores VHS as a tool and inspiration for artistic experimentation with a heavy dose of ephemerafrom the 80s analog culture, such as B horror movie posters and Max Headroom collectibles. Taking advantage of Franklin Street Works’ split-level architecture, Cleman juxtaposes observations from everyday domestic histories and art historical analysis of VHS consumption and artistic creation. Artists in the exhibition include Robert Beck, Sadie Benning, Dustin Guy Defa, James Fotopoulos and Trevor Shimizu. VHS The Exhibition is on view at Franklin Street Works through October 14.

Thanks to Minsk Vodka for sponsoring this event through their in-kind donation!

posted by Owner on September 20, 2012 at 5:30 pm

KENT EVANS: READING AND MUSIC – A CRASH COURSE ON THE ANATOMY OF ROBOTS

Franklin Street Works is proud to present an evening of music and readings with Kent Evans, author and multi-platform artist. This free public event is Thursday, September 20, from 5:30 – 7:00 pm and features Kent Evan’s forthcoming novel A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots, which releases on September 17, 2012 (Pangea Books).

Franklin Street Works is excited to be one of the first venues to host Evans after the release of his highly praised novel in this unique event that includes the author reading and related live music performances. Kent Evans will play guitar, Laura Wilson will be on violin, and Andrew Trudeau will join in with multiple instruments. While at the event audiences can also enjoy Franklin Street Work’s current group show, “VHS The Exhibition”! Curated by Rebecca Cleman, the exhibition explores VHS as a tool and inspiration for artistic experimentation, with a heavy dose of ephemera from the ‘80s analogue culture.

Kent Evan’s A Crash Course on the Anatomy of Robots is a gripping action-adventure novel inspired by personal events in the author’s life. Evan’s explains, “The books is sort of a love song to being an artist, travel, the death of my parents, and disastrous relationships.” The main character, Damien Wood, is a young man whose lived his life as a mere robot, hurling himself with abandon from place to place and from one hollow commitment to another. It is only after a series of tragedies that Damien’s full spectrum of emotions start to emerge, which sends him to Asia on a dark odyssey of self-revelation. The book has been widely praised, including Inés Ferrero Cándenas observation, “Crash Course travels on the wings of poetry, autobiography, relationships and humor to cross-examine modern reality and cultural rebellion.” Kent Evans also collaborated with musicians for an original soundtrack accompanying the book, available now on iTunes.

MORE: Video Footage of his performance on Vimeo, It’s Relevant Video Story on Kent Evans, and Kent’s Website.

About Kent Evans:

Half Cantonese and half UK, Kent Evans was born in New York City in 1975 and grew up between New York, Connecticut and Rhode Island. After graduating from New York University, he began traveling extensively throughout North America, Europe, Asia and the Caribbean. He is the author of Malas Ondas: Lime, Sand Sex and Salsa in the land of conquistadors, a semi-autobiographical novel about self-destruction throughout Latin America and finding love.  A fixture on the spoken word and experimental art scene in the 90’s, the artist has performed at such venues as Madison Square Garden Theatre and Académie Beaux Arts in Paris. His creative non-fiction and opinion pieces have appeared in numerous national pop-culture and literary zines and publications.

 

 

posted by Owner on August 30, 2012 at 6:00 pm

A Conversation: Recording Realities with Seth Kelly and Karsten Krejcarek, Thursday, August 30!

Franklin Street Works is proud to present the talented, and sometimes mischievous, visual artists Seth Kelly and Karsten Krejcarek in a lecture/performance hybrid that is likely to be provocative, informative, and entertaining. Seth Kelly who curated Franklin Street Works’ most recent group exhibition, These Transitional Spaces, will revisit the space during a time that Franklin Street Works is in transition between shows. For the presentation Kelly will present sound works with long-time collaborator and friend Karsten Krejcarek.  The two artists are joining us in person (Kelly) and remotely (Krejcarek) to share sound recordings and performative repartee.  This free, public event takes place at Franklin Street Works on August 30, from 6:00 to 7:30 pm.

Kelly and Krejcarek will present and introduce several audio recordings in this public talk. Both artists have independently incorporated audio and field recordings into their practices and research over the last several years. They will share assorted examples with one another while discussing their content and the medium of sound at large. Kelly’s work explores time/space displacement through a collection of recordings that diverge from deep space murmurs to antiquated baseball commentary. Krejcarek has recently returned from Bolivia where he chronicled two-and-a-half months of unusual occurrences in over fifty field recordings for a project titled “El Otro,” which the artist describes on the project’s website as “audio recordings habitually sent from the peculiar country of Bolivia”. It was played on a loop at the Franklin Street Works café during These Transitional Spaces, accompanying sandwich and salad enjoyment with the sounds of everything from an amateur band playing AC/DC covers to bird calls to melodic funeral music.

About the Artists:

Seth Kelly: Working in sculpture, drawing, and performance, Seth Kelly has exhibited widely since receiving his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in 1995.  Venues have included New York galleries PPOW and Marianne Boesky as well as the Greater New York exhibition at P.S.1 in Long Island City. His work has been covered in Art in America, the New York Times and the Brooklyn Rail. Recently, Kelly began curating as well, organizing “The Audio Show” at Friedrich Petzel Gallery in 2009.

Karsten Krejcarek: New York-based artist Karsten Krejcarek is a sculptor, photographer, and video maker.  Karsten’s work is concentrated on esoteric narrative, mystical symbolism and natural landscape. In the recent past, Karsten participated in ceremonial, unworldly and magic plant rituals with a shamanistic healer in the jungles of the Upper Amazon. It was during this time in the forest that he expanded upon ideas of multiplicity, telepathy, and symbiotic relationships between nature and the unconscious—concepts that have largely influenced his practice and informed the narrative structure of his recent work. Karsten received a MFA from Columbia University in 2000, is an adjunct faculty member of New York University, and has regularly exhibited his work over the last twelve years.

 

posted by Owner on August 23, 2012 at 5:00 pm

PoemAlley Responds to “These Transitional Spaces” Exhibition

Franklin Street Works presents an evening with PoemAlley, a local poet organization based in Stamford, Connecticut, on Thursday, August 23, from 5:00 – 7:00 pm. Please join us for this free, public event that includes poetry readings inspired by Franklin Street Work’s current exhibition, These Transitional Spaces! A zine of exhibition-related poems will also be featured in the art space and café and will be free to visitors. Similar to Franklin Street Works, PoemAlley is a non-profit organization that encourages openness, innovation, and discussion, meeting every Tuesday at Curley’s Diner in Stamford for poetry readings, debates, and food.

To make this project possible, PoemAlley members were invited to see the exhibition, These Transitional Spaces, and to write poems inspired by the exhibition or a single work. Many of the poems were written in the Franklin Street Works café! These Transitional Spaces, curated by artist Seth Kelly, runs from June 30 – August 26, 2012, at Franklin Street Works. A thematic, group exhibition, These Transitional Spaces evokes the impossibility of time and space being captured, prompting audiences to imagine alternate realities and histories. The lyrical breadth of and the somewhat self-reflexive curatorial approach to the exhibition makes a group show with a cloak of tears, a rainbow painter, and a floating pear a perfect fit for a poetry project. This is Franklin Street Works’ first literary event, but is in keeping with the organization’s mission of providing innovative art, cross-disciplinary programming, and “takeaway” literature (such as zines and artists books) as a way to engage the community. This is also Franklin Street Works and PoemAlley’s first collaboration and creates a unique opportunity for the two groups to expand their roles as hubs for creative exchange and dialogue in Stamford. “Contributing PoemAlley members are particularly enthusiastic about taking part in this ekphrastic program,” said PA Advisory Committee member Rolf Maurer, “The intimacy of Franklin Street Works’ multi-media space inspires interpretive probing on the part of casual visitors and artists of all types.”

About PoemAlley:

Founded in 1998 by Ann Yarmal and Catherine Ednie as a non-profit creative venture of the Unitarian Universalist Society in Stamford, PoemAlley continues to provide a weekly opportunity for poets, confessional/anecdotal writers, spoken word, and hip hop artists to share and discuss one another’s work –all within the warm and enduring walls of Stamford’s own Curley’s Diner.

Over the years, PoemAlley’s growth has included prominent guest speakers, themed poetry events throughout the Stamford/Greenwich area, and a series of original anthologies (for more: http://poemalley.blogspot.com). The group is open to anyone living in Fairfield County and the surrounding area. PoemAlley meets Tuesday nights at 7:30 pm at Curley’s on 62 Park Place (behind Target).

posted by Owner on June 27, 2012 at 6:00 pm

Pre-screening Reception for Herman and Shelly at Franklin Street Works

Franklin Street Works and the Avon Theatre are happy to be collaborating on an event for the first time. Please Join Us! for a night with emerging filmmaker Bridget Stokes to screen her movie, Herman and Shelly, Wednesday, June 27. Reception 6:00 – 7:00 pm at Franklin Street Works. Screening is at 7:30 in the Avon Theatre. We are walking distance from each other so enjoy a summer stroll in downtown stamford between events! This event is sponsored by the Loft Artists Association and Reckson.

MORE:

The Avon Theatre and the not-for-profit contemporary art space Franklin Street Works celebrate the first feature from local filmmaker, Bridget Stokes, titled Herman & Shelly with a screening on June 27th at 7:30 p.m. It is preceded by a reception at Franklin Street Works from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m., which features a signature cocktail by Rodizio Grill and Thomas Hooker beer. As creative platforms for art and film, Franklin Street Works and The Avon are committed to original programming for creative professionals. Sharing kindred missions, these alternative spaces are embarking on an initial partnership for what will hopefully be the first of many joint-efforts moving forward. In addition to the reception at the art space, there will be a post-film Q&A with the filmmakers. Ticket prices include the reception and are as follows: Carte Blanche: FREE, Members: $6, Students & Seniors: $8, Nonmembers: $11. For advance tickets, please call the Avon business office at 203-661-0321 or the box office at 203-967-3660. For our more spontaneous film enthusiasts, tickets will also be available at the door the night of the screening. This event is sponsored by the Loft Artists Association and Reckson.

ABOUT THE FILM: In this offbeat, quirky romantic comedy, high school chums Herman and Shelly navigate the odd transition from much-hyped youthful art prodigies to overlooked adult artists. Ambitions are pitted against lifelong bonds, with the zany mess of the art world acting as an ever-changing backdrop. A fresh take on coming of age, the murky space between lovers and friends, and the personal sacrifices endured for one’s art.

ABOUT THE AVON: The Avon Theatre is a member-supported, non-profit cultural hub, dedicated to presenting film in its highest form, and thriving because of the support of our patrons and community. In addition to an exciting slate of new releases that are hard to find anywhere else, The Avon brings you phenomenal special events and monthly programs. We are proud to provide a forum for in-person, community dialogue with directors, actors and other luminaries in a vibrant “Main Street America” setting.

ABOUT FRANKLIN STREET WORKS: Franklin Street Works is a new, not-for-profit contemporary art space, café, and social gathering place in Stamford, Connecticut. Located in renovated row houses on Franklin Street, the two-story space includes three galleries and a café. Franklin Street Works is located at 41 Franklin Street in downtown Stamford, Connecticut, near the UCONN campus. On street parking is available on Franklin Street and paid parking is available nearby in a lot on Franklin Street and in the Summer Street Garage (100 Summer Street), behind Target. For more information call 203-595-5211 or visit www.franklinstreetworks.org

ABOUT OUR SPONSORS: Loft Artists Association provides artists with a supportive environment, opportunities to exhibit their work, and networking opportunities and to reach out to the community at large with education and artistic expression.  Reckson, a division of SL Green Realty Corp. is Westchester and Fairfield counties’ largest Owner of class A office space, comprising 30 properties over 4 million square feet of commercial space. Avon Theatre Film Center, 272 Bedford St, Stamford, CT 06901, Box Office: (203) 967-3660, Business Office: (203) 661-0321, Website: www.avontheatre.org,Twitter: @avontheatre, Facebook: www.facebook.com/avontheatre

SPONSORS:

posted by Owner on June 21, 2012 at 4:30 pm

An Evening with Dekit Magazine, June 21, 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Franklin Street Works presents: An Evening with Dekit Magazine.  For the event, Dekit’s creators discuss how their nascent online magazine is a platform for emerging cultural producers and a catalyst for dialogue with both a local and global reach. Similar to Franklin Street Works, Dekit is decidedly interdisciplinary, featuring the visual arts, fashion, music, and more via shared themes such as “What does it mean to be human?” and the materiality of identity. A small but growing independent online publication based in Stamford, Connecticut, Dekit has featured street artists, photographers, painters, videographers, and musicians. Dekit’s experiments in artistic discourse encourages unique ways of approaching creative enterprises.

On June 21 from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Dekit magazine founder Stephanie Harris and the magazine’s Creative Director Nina Irizarry will share their story, leading a casual conversation about DIY-spirited publishing and the emerging artists they have collaborated with since the magazine’s inception. Additionally, Dekit will screen a video project that highlights some of the magazine’s featured artists, especially for this event.

According to Dekit’s creators, “The inception of the Internet and the innovation of technology have resulted in a shattering of geographic boundaries. Having a digital world at our fingertips has impacted the way in which we communicate, the types of dialogues we engage in or create, and the ways we influence one another,” adding, “This age of cutting edge innovations has also created a golden age of flux.”

Franklin Street Works and Dekit Magazine collaborated to produce this informative event that highlights the magazine’s mission, its challenges and its goals for the future. This event is part of Franklin Street Works’ commitment to providing an alternative space for contemporary art while providing a discursive platform for other independent ventures in art and culture. The event is free and open to the public.

 

posted by Owner on June 13, 2012 at 5:30 pm

S#!T/STORM: The Art of Data

Franklin Street Works presents an evening with two Internet entrepreneurs living in Fairfield County whose reach extends far beyond  the geographic boundaries of Connecticut. Young and dedicated, they have each developed a website that reflects their interests in the Internet’s ability to organize and share data on a single subject. For EveryTornado.net, Sam Sagnella spent several years conceiving and building a website database project whose goal is to provide a broader insight into United States tornadoes by supplementing statistical data with first-hand event video gathered from those who were there. He will give a multi-media presentation, highlighting his efforts. For the second half of the talk, website designer and programmer Jeff Schram of Schram Industries discusses his experiment in gathering data from Twitter with PoopStats.com. His site investigates the phenomenon of people tweeting with the hashtag #pooping. This identifier indicates that the author is pooping while tweeting.  Schram programmed a site whose home page is in constant flux as the number of #pooping tweeters changes with the ebb and flow of this one thread of Twitter activity.  With PoopStats, the quirky and curious can see how many people in the world are tweeting while pooping at any particular time!

Franklin Street Works named this exciting program S#!T/Storm: The Art of Data to reflect the themes, humor, and freshness of these digital thinkers and their projects! Through projected images, informal lecture, and performance, we will learn more about the thinking, logistics, and interfaces of these nascent websites. This free, public event takes place from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. at Franklin Street Works on Wednesday, June 13.

EveryTornado.net is a unique tornado database project that includes riveting videos, allowing for site visitors to learn about the details of specific tornado events and  also to “witness” them. Since launching in August of 2011, EveryTornado.net has chronicled nearly 1000 tornadoes, and archived event videos for more than half of them. In the present-day social media world, the sharing of experiences has become a way for people to learn from what others have gone through without ever meeting them. EveryTornado.net captures people’s recorded tornado encounters, and organizes them in a way that produces a dramatic perspective into what experiencing a tornado can be like. Featured videos come from every type of scenario: from storm chasers using their professional High-Definition video cameras, to commuters caught in traffic on the highway using smartphones, to people in their backyards with  family camcorders. Tornadoes have impacted every state in the country. Connecticut has been hit 79 times since 1950, with 12 occurring in the last six years alone. The Nutmeg State’s 79 modern tornadoes have caused in excess of 300 million dollars in property damage and killed at least three people.

A more humorous approach to collecting data, PoopStats.com is the brainchild of web designer Jeff Schram, who splits his time between Stamford and New York City. With PoopStats.com, Schram created a homepage that monitors how many people are using #pooping while tweeting at any given time. According to Schram, “At any given moment, there are roughly 300-500 people #pooping on Twitter.  Seriously, we can’t make this shit up,” adding “PoopStats.com was created as a fun experiment to investigate this phenomenon of Twitter users adding #pooping to their tweets and the motivations behind people wanting to let you know the most private moments of their lives.” In his presentation, PoopStats creator Jeff Schram talks about the inspiration and creation of the website, what he’s learned so far, and what he hopes to discover venturing down this bold path.

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

Sam Sagnella, a 25-year old Westport, Connecticut, native with a lifelong passion for weather, founded EveryTornado.net.  By his sophomore year at Staples High School he was enrolled in an “authentic science research” class, which allowed students to choose a project that interested them and invest school hours in researching it.  Sam’s project “Severe Weather Preparedness of Fairfield County, Connecticut Towns” involved interviews with emergency management personnel from around the county, and its success led to an eventual presentation of his findings on live television through ABC affiliate WTNH-TV in 2003. After graduating from Staples in 2004, Sam moved to Oklahoma to continue to pursue a career in the field of meteorology, and began chasing storms there in 2005. It was during these next few years — during which he witnessed more than a dozen tornadoes — that the idea for EveryTornado.net was born.

Jeff Schram has been working in the web industry, based in NYC, for the last 7 years. Though he started off as an independent freelancer, he’s recently enjoyed working alongside such companies as The Cutting Room, Modus Associates and Crush + Lovely. He combines his love of art, music and creativity with an in-depth knowledge of the inner-workings of the web and is the owner of Schram Industries, a web design firm.

This event is sponsored, in part, by Lamburt Corporation Insurance, Stratford, Connecticut, www.lamburt.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

posted by Owner on March 29, 2012 at 5:30 pm

A Night with the Creatives from the Comedy Network NPeaches

Thursday, March 29, 5:30 – 7:30

Franklin Street Works proudly presents a night with the writers, producers and directors of a local, up-and-coming network for new online comedy programs. NPeaches creates original and often humorous shows such as the satirical “Ronaldo Tours,” where an Italian-American character explores cities — from New Haven to Toronto — giving his humorous, fish-out-of-water take on local cultural phenomena. Based in the Stamford area, NPeaches aims to contribute to social and political change through the lens of comedy. We invite you to screen “Ronaldo Tour” episodes and chat with the producers, directors, and other collaborators on this, often mischievous and always provocative, creative enterprise. This free, public event is March 29, 5:30 – 7:30 at Franklin Street Works. The evening will begin with a short talk, which will be followed by a casual, social reception with cast, crew, and creatives.

 

posted by Owner on March 22, 2012 at 6:00 pm

Documentary on artist Gordon Skinner by Bob Albert

Thursday, March 22 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Videographer Bob Albert of Take Notice Productions and visual artist Gordon Skinner discuss the making of their short, collaborative documentary at Franklin Street Works, March 22 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm.  For filmmaker Bob Albert, the project serves as an artist statement about Skinner’s paintings, creating a cinematic platform for the visual artist to describe his influences and overall perspective. You are invited to join them for a screening of the eight-minute video followed by a lively discussion about the triumphs, pitfalls, and lessons learned during this project!

posted by Owner on March 15, 2012 at 6:00 pm

The Imagined City: A Multimedia Work-in-Progress by Renee Kahn

Thursday, March 15 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Franklin Street Works presents The Imagined City: A Multimedia Work-in-Progress by Renee Kahn, Thursday, March 15, 6:00 – 8:00 pm.  Join us for a one-night event where the artist will share her new project and invite audience input! Also included is a related animated film by Cici Artist and, following Kahn’s presentation, a screening of Lionel Rogosin’s award-winning film “On the Bowery.” This event is free and open to the public.

posted by Owner on March 8, 2012 at 2:35 am

Wine Tasting with Grapes of Norwalk

Thursday, March 8 from 6:00 – 7:30 pm

Franklin Street Works presents a free, seated Wine Tasting with Grapes of Norwalk’s Jim Winston from 6:00 – 7:30 pm. Jim will begin with a sparkler, then walk us through two whites and six to seven reds, sharing a mixed bag of styles, textures and levels of complexity. He will conclude with a dessert wine. While the event is casual, this tasting has a specific start time so participants should arrive at 6:00pm. Please RSVP to terri@franklinstreetworks (Limit 26 people).

posted by Owner on January 13, 2012 at 2:17 pm

Wine and Time: Conversation and Wine Tasting

Time is wine’s friend and foe. Wine needs time to evolve from a fermented grape juice into nectar capable of soliciting a range of sensory responses. When neglected, wine can be ruined; and when crafted with a watchful eye to the clock, it can transcend the processes involved in its making. Wine and time have maintained a very complex relationship during the past eight thousand years, and this relationship continues to develop. Join host and wine enthusiast Anatoli Levine (creator of the popular Talk-a-Vino blog) for an informal glimpse into the complex relationship between wine and time! Gain insights into the delicate art of making and tasting wine while sampling some stellar varietals Thursday, January 19, from 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. in the cozy ambience of Franklin Street Works’ café. This event is designed to complement our current exhibition, Slipstreams: Contemporary Artistic Practice and the Shaping of Time, which will be on view before and during the tasting.

To assist us with planning, Franklin Street Works invites interested parties to RSVP for this event at terri@franklinstreetworks.org. However, last-minute drop-ins are also welcome!

posted by Owner on January 5, 2012 at 6:00 pm

Sea Rhapsody Plays in our Works Weeknights series on January 5!

Thursday, January 5, 2012 from 6:00 – 7:00 p.m.

The Works Weeknights series brings local, regional, and national talent to the café and art space on Thursday evenings. On January 5, the band Sea Rhapsody, whose members attend the University of Connecticut in Stamford, will do a semi-acoustic set on site from 6:00 – 7:00 p.m. Please join us and enjoy the music, the café, and our current exhibition, Slipstreams: Contemporary Artistic Practice and the Shaping of Time!


 

posted by Owner on December 8, 2011 at 5:00 pm

Grill the Curator(s): “Slipstreams” tour

Thursday, December 8, from 5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Join a guided tour of our new exhibition Slipstreams: Contemporary Artistic Practice and the Shaping of Time, which will be given by the exhibition’s curators Terri C Smith and Joseph Whitt. Artists in the exhibition include, Pierre Bismuth, Tehching Hsieh, Tara Kelton, Anna Lundh, Samuel Rousseau, Stephen Sollins, Conrad Ventur, and Andy Warhol. We hope you can join us to hear more about the works, ask questions, and discuss the show’s themes in a casual environment.

The event is free and open to the public.

About the Curators

Terri C. Smith is the Creative Director of Franklin Street Works. With approximately fifteen years of curatorial experience, she has created exhibitions and related programming for museums and other not-for-profit art institutions, including award-winning contemporary art programs for Cheekwood Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee. After more than ten years at the Museum, she returned to school, earning an MA from Bard College’s Center for Curatorial Studies in 2008. Smith has curated exhibitions for venues in Connecticut, Florida, New York, Oregon, and Tennessee. Other projects have included commissioned catalog essays and journalistic projects for print and radio. http://terricsmith.blogspot.com/

Joseph Whitt is the Assistant Curator at Franklin Street Works and a frequent guest curator at several art venues in New York City. As former Assistant Curator at Vanderbilt University’s Fine Arts Gallery in Nashville, he was responsible for solo exhibitions by Harmony Korine and Jules de Balincourt, as well as a group exhibition pairing the Polaroids of Andy Warhol with the works of emerging artists Grant Worth and David Horvitz. His most recent curatorial project, Magic For Beginners, at P.P.O.W. Gallery (NYC), was a critic’s pick in Time Out New York and garnered a prominent review in The New York Times.

posted by Owner on December 3, 2011 at 4:00 pm

Anna Lundh programming

SLIPSTREAMS: OPENING WEEKEND PROGRAMMING

Friday, December 2, noon – 5:00 and Saturday, December 3, noon – 3:00 p.m. Interactive project with Anna Lundh.  

Visitors are invited to think about how they visualize time via Swedish artist Anna Lundh’s survey. The activities are part of her ongoing project The Year is a Python that swallowed

 an Elephant (2009-present),which also includes an installation and performance.

Saturday, December 3, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.  Anna Lundh performance. 

This subtly humorous performance is based on Lundh’s findings from The Year is a Python that swallowed an Elephant

posted by gallery admin on November 10, 2011 at 5:30 pm

THE MOON: Live Music and Visuals

After a 5:00 pm casual tour of the exhibition Fernando (last day November 13!), Holly Danger and Jeff Schram present “THE MOON,” a VJ/Music “alternative space” in the downstairs gallery at Franklin Street Works.

THE MOON: 

The Moon is a new audio visual performance project created by musician Jeff Schram and VJ Holly Danger.

The atmosphere will be filled with acoustic music, heightened by electronic elements, vocals & digital manipulation.
Synchronized visual projections and camera effects will be mixed live by local video artist Holly Danger.

Together they will transform the space into a colorful dreamworld of visionary motion, art & sound.


posted by gallery admin on October 22, 2011 at 12:00 pm

City Saturday: “The Garden Party” performance by Trisha Baga

On October 22 from 12:00 – 6:00 pm Franklin Street Works hosts City Saturday. Curator Terri C Smith gives tours and the day’s festivities are topped off with an original performance by Trisha Baga titled “The Garden Party.” Throughout the day special plates are served in the cafe, including ribs, sliders, and special beers.

All of the artists from our inaugural exhibition “Fernando” are in attendance.  Baga and a collaborator dressed as a cow in high heels lead a procession of gallery goers through downtown Stamford, followed by a performance. Baga’s performance, which is informed by everything from Stamford’s rappelling Santa, to wedding ceremonies, to Occupy Wall Street to a quote from the television show “The Office,” provides a loose narrative that touches on the architecture and civic rituals of Stamford, but is also imbued with broader experiences, including hope, rejection, exhaustion and melody.

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posted by gallery admin on October 13, 2011 at 5:30 pm

Grill the Curator: Fernando

A brief tour of the exhibition, Fernando, will be followed by a casual Q & A session/discussion in the café with the show’s curator, Terri C Smith. Fernando features original commissioned works by emerging artists Trisha Baga, Lukas Geronimas, and Mads Lynnerup. The exhibition — its inspirations, artists, and installation – will be the starting point for a free-form discussion that could lead virtually anywhere!

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