Art+Feminism Edit-A-Thon followed by exhibition tour and cocktails

Program Date: March 05, 2016 at 2:04 pm

There will be an Art+Feminism Edit-A-Thon at Darien Library: Sat, March 5th, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., followed by a tour of the Feminist-themed Exhibition, “Cut-Up: Contemporary Collage and Cut-Up Histories through a Feminist Lens,” and Reception from 4:30 – 7:00 pm at Franklin Street Works. You can REGISTER HERE for this free, public event:

Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity is not. Content is skewed by the lack of female participation. This represents an alarming absence in an increasingly important repository of shared knowledge.

Join us for a half-day, edit-a-thon to contribute and expand upon Wikipedia articles relating to art and feminism. After the edit-a-thon, we will celebrate at Franklin Street Works contemporary art space and cafe with a 20-minute tour of the original exhibition “Cut-Up: Contemporary Collage and Cut-Up Histories through a Feminist Lens,” followed by a wine and cheese reception. Edit-a-thon will be from 1 to 4 p.m. and exhibition tour and reception will be from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Join the revolution!

Reference materials will be provided, but attendees are encouraged to familiarize themselves with a topic beforehand. We encourage participants to look at the exhibiting artists in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition for entry/edit inspiration, they are listed in the exhibition description here:http://www.franklinstreetworks.org/cut-up-contemporary-collage-and-cut-up-histories-through-a-feminist-lens/. This event is co-sponsored by the Darien Library and Franklin Street Works.


The programs at Franklin Street Works are explorations of creative projects that inspire contemporary art enthusiasts to come together in conversation.

Exhibition Programming

Exhibition programming expands on the art space’s original shows through a closer look at the art on view, stimulating conversations surrounding the exhibition’s theme. For our exhibition programming, Franklin Street Works connects communities with artists, curators, and innovative cultural producers via free public workshops, performances, and talks. These efforts elucidate each exhibition by going more deeply into its intentions and adding discursive content through educational and social interactions.

Exhibition programs include artists’ presentations, tours, performances, and hands on activities, such as artist Emily Larned’s book binding workshop. Notable participatory performances include Trisha Baga’s “The Garden Party” — where the public joined in the artist’s parade from Franklin Street Works to the Landmark Square building in Downtown Stamford, Connecticut; and David Horvitz’s “Honey Locust Tree Relocation” project where participants from Connecticut and New York carried more than thirty Honey Locust tree saplings from Clocktower Gallery in New York City to their new home at Franklin Street Works. Generative, cross-disciplinary programs are another way Franklin Street Works explores the relevance of contemporary art, such as the 2013 exhibition-inspired poetry reading and zine featuring texts by UConn, Stamford, writing students.

Ongoing Programming

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The ongoing programs at Franklin Street Works are community-building events that show the breadth of cultural production in and around Fairfield County. For our ongoing programming, Franklin Street Works has featured VJs, musicians, novelists, DJs, website designers, artists, writers, and filmmakers from the region in one-night events that showcase their efforts at different phases of development. In-progress programs include events such as artist Renee Kahn workshopping a new, immersive installation and receiving audience feedback. Finished projects have included Kent Evans’ performance using text from his published book and a talk by two website designers about their online projects.

Emily Larned’s book binding workshop

The Garden Party with Trisha Baga

Honey Locust Tree Relocation

UConn reading